#1
So I bought a used Jackson guitar on eBay, it comes with four tremolo springs, the seller doesn't know what string were installed, I can only tell by the look that 6th string is definitely 053, 1st at least 010, maybe 011.

My question is if I’m going to use 010-046, which is what I’m used to, should I remove one of the fours tremolo springs to lessen the tension?

Thanks~
#2
I only use 2 springs.

Edit: Totally wrong there. After looking, theres 3 on both my FR guitars.
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Last edited by pantallica87 at Jan 29, 2015,
#3
You can balance string tension on E standard with as few as 2 springs while using strings up to 11's (strings are often referred to by the size of the high E string if it's a standard set).

The number of springs you use will determine how easy or how difficult it is to dive the trem, but they're not all that important in determining an equilibrium point at which to balance string tension.

If you use lightweight springs or fewer springs, it's easier to dive (lower pitch by pushing down on the arm with) the trem. There's a tradeoff, of course. If you bend a note, the trem's backside will raise into the air more easily. This lowers the pitch on the other strings, making them flat, and it also forces you to push the bend farther in order to achieve the same note that you would with less movement on a hardtail bridge. If you use more or heavier springs, it requires more downward pressure to dive the trem, but bends will become easier and less likely to raise the rear of the trem and flatten the other strings' pitch during the bend.
#4
No, removing one of the springs won't reduce the tension on the strings, as they will require the same tension to be in tune. The springs for the trem affect how much pressure is needed to manipulate the trem. If you are pushing down on the bar the springs are fighting against you, less springs means less force fighting you, conversely there is also less force pulling the bridge back to its resting state. Its really a matter of preference for how it feels and plays for you but it has nothing to do with the gauge of strings you have on. I have run 10-46 strings with 3 springs and with 5 springs.
#5
Quote by dspellman
You can balance string tension on E standard with as few as 2 springs while using strings up to 11's (strings are often referred to by the size of the high E string if it's a standard set).

The number of springs you use will determine how easy or how difficult it is to dive the trem, but they're not all that important in determining an equilibrium point at which to balance string tension.

If you use lightweight springs or fewer springs, it's easier to dive (lower pitch by pushing down on the arm with) the trem. There's a tradeoff, of course. If you bend a note, the trem's backside will raise into the air more easily. This lowers the pitch on the other strings, making them flat, and it also forces you to push the bend farther in order to achieve the same note that you would with less movement on a hardtail bridge. If you use more or heavier springs, it requires more downward pressure to dive the trem, but bends will become easier and less likely to raise the rear of the trem and flatten the other strings' pitch during the bend.


+1


Also, guitarsngear, which Jackson is it so we know which kind of trem you're talking about?
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#6
Yeah, springs have nothing to do with string gauge.

Fun Fact: Stevie Ray Vaughan used all 5 springs on his Fenders. He also had to get custom tremolo arms made because he kept snapping them off.
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#7
Quote by JustRooster

Also, guitarsngear, which Jackson is it so we know which kind of trem you're talking about?


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Last edited by guitarsngear at Jan 29, 2015,
#8
Thanks a lot for the help guys, really appreciate it.

I do have a follow up question regarding tuning though.
The thing is, the guitar is currently set up as standard tuning with 011-053 strings, is that bad for the neck? I mean could it withstand such tuning? Should I tune it down half or even 1 step?
#9
Good question, generally heavier strings are used for lower tunings to keep tension up so the strings don't flop around and loose their definition, this does mean that at higher or more standard tunings there will be increased pressure on the neck. Necks can withstand a fair amount of tension (you might need to adjust the truss rod though). I personally would say that 46, 48 are fine for standard tuning, I have seen some guys use 52s with standard, but for me, if you are going over 48 you should probably be tuning down a step, for the sake of the neck and also playability. With heavier strings in standard tuning the tension can get to the point of compromising playability and comfort.
#10
i have .11's in std tuning on 25.5" scale necks with no issues. EVERY guitar with a trem i have gets 5 strings.
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#11
Quote by guitarsngear
Good question, generally heavier strings are used for lower tunings to keep tension up so the strings don't flop around and loose their definition, this does mean that at higher or more standard tunings there will be increased pressure on the neck. Necks can withstand a fair amount of tension (you might need to adjust the truss rod though). I personally would say that 46, 48 are fine for standard tuning, I have seen some guys use 52s with standard, but for me, if you are going over 48 you should probably be tuning down a step, for the sake of the neck and also playability. With heavier strings in standard tuning the tension can get to the point of compromising playability and comfort.



Very helpful, thanks again!