#1
i stopped at one guitar shop and compared the yamaha FGX700SC along with the 720 and 730- the 730 seemed to sound just a TAD better then either but the play action on the 720 was better- maybe diff strings on all 3 boxes, anyway- went to another store today and tried a taylor 214CE- course i got a great deal off the $999 price, but compared it to a FGX700SC on stock, the yamaha was $300, and honestly, i couldnt see a $700 price difference, the yahama just seemed to hold its own in play action and sound, i dunno, just ranting on here about what im gonna do when i trade up, i do have my FX370C im happy with, but its not a solid top, basically im just after a clean full sound
#2
i wouldn't consider the 214 a step up from the FG730, which definitely sounds better to me than the FG700, btw. the 214 is also a solid top, laminate back and sides guitar, just like the yamaha FG guitars, and what you're mainly paying that extra money for is the taylor name on the headstock and the fact that it's made in mexico rather than in china - mexico wages are higher.

i'm curious - did you feel the 214 had a "clean, full" sound?

have you tried guild GAD series guitars? a great value, nice guitars, all solid, come with hardshell cases. balanced tone, gloss finishes. if you haven't tried 'em, you may find they're just up your alley.

you can get an all solid recording king, epiphone, blueridge or eastman for a grand or less, and each of those brands makes some nice sounding guitars, although they're probably a bit bassier than your current guitar except for eastman, which makes a wider variety tonally.

and let's not forget the all solid yamaha L series models. some are solid tops, but some are all solid for also under a grand.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
Last edited by patticake at Jan 31, 2015,
#3
There isn't any relationship between price and tone in standard factory acoustic guitars that I can hear. It comes down to what you like, specific models, and even individual guitars. - My favourite guitar for fingerpicking is all-laminate. What you get in the Taylor is higher production costs (Mexico v China), possibly better materials, possibly a lifetime warranty to the original owner and a neck that can be reset. The resettable neck means that you will be able to hand it down to your greatgrandchildren if you look after it.

It isn't a good idea to place to much weight on feel when trying guitars, because the set up often isn't good, but can easily be adjusted.
#4
Setting the neck is an extremely critical step in assembling a guitar. A tenth of a degree up or down can change the string height more than one might expect. As long as you're familiar with how to eyeball how much saddle is showing versus how much you might need to remove to place the action where you want it, you can pretty much negate, (at least mentally), the differences in playability. Most guitars are shipped with D'Addario acoustic lights, (.012 to .053) Phosphor Bronze. Taylor however, ships, (ATM AFAIK), with Elixirs. (Lights also, or whatever Elixir calls the version of .012 to .053, or thereabouts.

As far as other choices go, the Yamaha FGX-700 (which you've already tried), never fails to please. They don't make it left handed. If they did, I probably would have talked myself / brainwashed myself into buying one by now.

The latest run of Epiphone acoustics, (built in Indonesia), are receiving rave reviews. Of particular interest are the EJ-200CE, (Gibson J-200, but with a cutaway and stereo electronics). Hopefully I'll have two of these this coming Tuesday. It's HUGE, and carries Gibson's eccentric C&W styling. The guitar has a maple body and so a distinctly different sound from the more common mahogany varieties.

Then there's the "Inspired by 1964 Texan". (Yeah, that's a bizarre name). Solid spruce top, along with a solid mahogany back. Sir Pal wrote yesterday on one of the original Texans.

Both the Epis have "Shadow" electronics, as opposed to the much more prevalent Fishman type. Stereo in the EJ-200, mono, (I think), in the IB Texan.

Then there's the Seagull "Original S-6". This guitar is arguably the best of the bunch, (I've mentioned). And everybody that has one, raves about it.

Here, they do make a leftie version, but I won't pay more than $500.009 for a guitar with less than 12 strings. And yeah, I suppose that's a personal problem.

Any or all of the foregoing are certainly worth, or possibly worth more, than their relative cost of admission.

There are some other maker's guitars worth a listen, Cort, Recording King, and The (Chinese) Guild "GAD" line.

However, once too many choices are offered, the difficulty of choosing seems to increase exponentially.

Regarding the Taylors, their 1xx & 2xx series, (& higher), have bolt on necks. Ostensibly, this extends the useful life of their guitars, in that you can easily, "reset", the neck. Of course, frets, soundboards, and tuners, have similar wear counterparts in set neck guitars.

Edit: Tony ninja'd me on the bolt on neck speil. But, since I got most of it from him anyway, I suppose it's only fair...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 31, 2015,
#5
try the guild GAD series guitars and see what you think. then report back. they have a size like the 214, more or less, as well as dreads. i think they'd be a very good step up guitar for someone who likes the sound of the FG730 as i feel there are similar tonal qualities but more resonance.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#7
Quote by Captaincranky


The latest run of Epiphone acoustics, (built in Indonesia), are receiving rave reviews. Of particular interest are the EJ-200CE, (Gibson J-200, but with a cutaway and stereo electronics). Hopefully I'll have two of these this coming Tuesday. It's HUGE, and carries Gibson's eccentric C&W styling. The guitar has a maple body and so a distinctly different sound from the more common mahogany varieties.



Maple body acoustics are so damn nice. I find it odd that more people don't seem to like them, or look for them. Speaking of, Taylor redesigned the maple 6xx series this year, like they did the 8xx last year, and Jesus Tapdancing Christ, they're beautiful. Look like violins, almost.

http://www.taylorguitars.com/sites/default/files/guitars/acoustic/models/Media%20browser/618e-back-taylor-guitars-2015-full.jpg

Edit: un-embedded the picture because it's super wide and messes with the post formatting.
Last edited by the_bi99man at Jan 31, 2015,
#8
Quote by patticake
i wouldn't consider the 214 a step up from the FG730, which definitely sounds better to me than the FG700, btw. the 214 is also a solid top, laminate back and sides guitar, just like the yamaha FG guitars, and what you're mainly paying that extra money for is the taylor name on the headstock and the fact that it's made in mexico rather than in china - mexico wages are higher.




The 214 is made in the USA in their California factory. Only the Baby Taylors are made in Mexico.
#9
Quote by KG6_Steven
The 214 is made in the USA in their California factory. Only the Baby Taylors are made in Mexico.
The Taylor factory is in El Cajon CA, about 20 miles from the US/Mexico border.

So,. while Taylor guitars may be physically manufactured in the US, culturally, they're made in Mexico....
#10
the old taylor 200 series was made in the u.s., but it's been years since they were made in el cajon http://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=204799
particularly make note of Ted @ LA Guitar Sales post in that thread, as he's always going to taylor to order new built to order guitars and sells a lot of taylors.

the 100 series and baby were always made in mexico, or so i was told on the phone by taylor support.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#11
Quote by KG6_Steven
The 214 is made in the USA in their California factory. Only the Baby Taylors are made in Mexico.


The ones I've seen have been MIM. Both the 100 and 200 series have been MIM for several years. Here's a reference:

http://www.musicradar.com/reviews/guitars/taylor-150e-606537/

FWIW, I have consistently preferred the 200 series I've tried to the more expensive MIA series.
#12
i like the 100 series, but i don't like it better than the seagull S6 or the guild GADs.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#13
Quote by the_bi99man
Maple body acoustics are so damn nice. I find it odd that more people don't seem to like them, or look for them. Speaking of, Taylor redesigned the maple 6xx series this year, like they did the 8xx last year, and Jesus Tapdancing Christ, they're beautiful. Look like violins, almost. .....
Yeah, the back of Gibson's J-200 is that "fiddleback" flame maple too.

Maple really isn't the best top wood, but it is a great B & S material. I think a lot of makers have done maple a disservice by selling it as an appearance veneer for AE guitars. It works plugged in, and its stiffness, (along with the lamination), immunizes these guitars against feedback to some extent. But unplugged, they're just passable at best.

A couple of decades ago, I had a Guild jumbo 12 string built for me. I wasn't preoccupied with the back story or wood or whatever. A salesman recommended it to me, and I took his word for it. It was spruce top, maple B & S. To this day I couldn't tell you the model number. But, the sound was phenomenal. When I got my EJ-200, the first D chord I hit, immediately reconnected me with the sound of that 12 string. Heavenly, simply heavenly!

I'm also of the opinion the maple works best for jumbo guitars. It could possibly get a bit brittle sounding if you built a parlor guitar out of it. But that's just a semi-uneducated guess...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 2, 2015,
#14
Quote by KG6_Steven
The 214 is made in the USA in their California factory. Only the Baby Taylors are made in Mexico.


The 100 and 200 series have been made in Mexico for several years now.
#16
i'm just going to let this brew in my brain for awhile- 1st off remember i hear with an implant and music is a miracle, went back to another shop and looked yamaha's, im not knocking yamaha, i do own 2 of em, but anyway- not to sure about this 'made in china' anymore- the fgx700sc was a solid top but you could 2 different color woods, it was quite obvious, like those knockoff's i seen on Utube- then the fgx720sc did play better, but cripe- the top looked like really WIDE open grain, hard to explain, but sort of like a puzzle piece, i mean seriously, the solid top on my FG403s (made in korea) is simply smooth and gorgeous, i took it for a trade and the guy looked at me like i was kinda offbeat- i knew mine had a better sound, i could 'feel' it, but with my hearing a tinnier sounding guitar is just more clear, i know that sucks, but for right now im stuck until i see my doc again and improve my pitch perception - i might look at the fgx730sc's and if the quality is any better
#17
Quote by harpspitfire
i'm just going to let this brew in my brain for awhile- 1st off remember i hear with an implant and music is a miracle, went back to another shop and looked yamaha's, im not knocking yamaha, i do own 2 of em, but anyway- not to sure about this 'made in china' anymore- the fgx700sc was a solid top but you could 2 different color woods, it was quite obvious, like those knockoff's i seen on Utube- then the fgx720sc did play better, but cripe- the top looked like really WIDE open grain, hard to explain, but sort of like a puzzle piece, i mean seriously, the solid top on my FG403s (made in korea) is simply smooth and gorgeous, i took it for a trade and the guy looked at me like i was kinda offbeat- i knew mine had a better sound, i could 'feel' it, but with my hearing a tinnier sounding guitar is just more clear, i know that sucks, but for right now im stuck until i see my doc again and improve my pitch perception - i might look at the fgx730sc's and if the quality is any better
Well, the truly good trees are all dead, is case you didn't get the memo...

That notwithstanding, Asian built guitars began to proliferate more than 2 decades ago. They all pretty much sucked, save for those built in Japan. The Japanese have almost as much of a problem with astronomical labors costs, as does the US nowadays.
So, Japanese corporations trying to make a price point, in many cases, resort to Chinese factories. The upside to this is, the Chinese build more guitars than just about anybody on the planet. Arguably, the more practice you get at doing something, the better you become at it.

So, I don't fear MIC as much as I once did.

In you situation, instead of going out of your way to buy, "a tinny guitar", I'd just plug a good one in, and use the EQ to your advantage. Remember, if you're playing for others, you're going to have to apply some Kentucky windage to your EQ profile, so you don't drive them out of the room with shrill.

FWIW, allegedly, wide gran in a top favors bass, while very tight grain favors the highs. Or at least the guy from Stew Mac claims that's the case. But, he goes on to say,"use your ears anyway, as you never can tell what anything will sound like, until you glue the whole mess together".

So, keep the guitars you have now, and grab an AE something or other, plug it in and EQ it to meet your needs. Maybe get another player's opinion on what sounds good od bad. As long as he's not the salesman, it wil likely work out pretty well.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 12, 2015,