#1
I tried a search but I'm not really sure what to call what I want to do.

I hope the following makes sense

I build pedals.
currently working on several different fuzz pedals.
Before I continue, here is what I have to work with:
1. Guitars (duh)
2. Effects
3. Vox AC30 and a Peavey Vypyr 30.
4. Tascam Portastudio DP-02CF (the 8 track one with the flash card).
(The manual an be found here : http://tascam.com/content/downloads/products/37/E_DP-02&02CF_web.pdf )

The Tascam has a direct input for the guitar.
The only thing i have to record on is the Tascam.
What I want to do is record a clean track (chords, lead noodling, just a little bit of everything) into the Tascam.

I then would like to output that single recorded track through my amp several different times, each time with a different pedal, and record the results, using the Tascam (Through a roundabout way I guess).

But I don't have any other decent recording devices, nor do I have any kind of interface to record directly to my computer.
But the Tascam does have a USB connection that lets me transfer recordings to my computer.
So after transferring the recording to my computer, maybe I could play the sound on my computer > reamping box* > pedal > AC30 > mic > Tascam ?
And I'm broke so buying more hardware is out of the question ATM (But I do have loads of electronic components so I could probably build almost anything if need be).

*Found a DIY way to make a reamping box so I'm guessing I would need that to run the line out from the computer to my amp).

Anyone think this way would work or is there a better way without having to buy more equipment?
If this would work, what kind of quality could I expect?


Thanks.
#2
If you're on the cheap that's your best bet.

If that worked you could expect an acceptable quality, but not any better than acceptable.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#3
Ideally, I would like a good quality recording, but I know thats just wishful thinking given the gear I have at my disposal.

If I was able to find another recording device (I think a friend of mine has one, haven't seen him for a few months though, but hes cool), do you think that would improve the quality?

I'm no recording genius (I prefer to use my "genius" building pedals ) , but I'm guessing that my laptop (and its audio hardware) is the weak link in my current plan.
Correct?

Or are there other weak links?

I do have at least a few weeks to a few month before I'm going to be able to record anyway.
It may give me some time to locate and borrow some better hardware.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Feb 1, 2015,
#4
The audio interface (sound card) in your laptop is the bottleneck.

To raise the overall quality, the most important thing to do is getting a decent audio interface.

Then, you need a reamping box and a basic one will work just fine, but you may prefer the features of a "fuller" one, say transformers to change impedance and other stuff that would mildly (arguably) improve the sound.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#5
I've gotten acceptable results reamping running out of my computer and interface using a passive DI box "backwards" to go from the interface to the amp. The actual reamp boxes might sound better though, I have no experience with them, but the DI box didn't cost me anything to try and for my skill level it works.

I am unfamiliar with your recorder, but I have a similar one, the Boss BR600. If I am not mistaken, you might be able to get a pretty simple set up going with what you have.

If you could go Tascam line out > Passive DI "backwards" > Amp it just might work. Then you could mic your amp and have that go back to the Tascam and just record it all on there with no dedicated interface. Then transfer the files to your computer from the memory card.

I'm still learning myself, and I still don't quite understand all the technical aspects myself regarding reamping, reamp boxes, DI boxes, line level, impedance etc. so if someone with more knowledge could chip in that would be useful. I don't want to advise anything that could potentially cause damage to your equipment but it worked for me, haha.

Jackson RR3 Rhoads and DK2M Dinky
Peavey 6505+ w/ Avatar 212 cab
Ibanez TS9, ISP Decimator, MXR 10 Band EQ
-Digitech RP1000
#6
The Tascam should be fine recording your guitar direct, then the revamping gets a little sketchy...
The sound output level will probably be too low, although I'm not familiar with that recorder. DI in reverse might be OK as suggested but probably you'll have to boost signal level, so maybe active reamp box will be better but then it colors the sound. Try it, see how it goes.
#7
Its been awhile since I have looked at the manual for the Tascam...
But it does have an effects loop.
Also IIRC correctly, it also lets you transfer a recording from one track to another. I have no idea how to do that, and I may be totally wrong about it having that capability, but it did give me an idea.

Play clean through amp and mic it into the recorder into say channel 1.
Transfer the recording from channel 1 into channel 2 while having the pedals in the effects loop.

Like I said, I don't know for sure if that will work and I don't know how the effects loop is hooked up internally and would let me do that, but if it does, It sounds like a pretty damn good solution.

I'm gonna have to break out the manual tomorrow and have a good read.


Edit:
I've got the PDF of the manual, it does let you clone one track to another.
Now to hunt for info regarding the effects loop.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Feb 3, 2015,
#8
If I'm reading both of these right (its past 7am and I should have been asleep a LONG time ago ), what I want to do may be possible without having to buy or make any other gear.




This is page 27 mentioned in the above image.



Comments?
Thought?
Did I get lucky or is my brain just overworked after spending 14+ hours writing code and doing some PCB design?
#9
You would still need a reamping box, and since the converters of the thing won't be any better than average, if you want a seriously good sound I'd still get a proper audio interface.

If you're on the cheap, it's better than the computer alone.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#10
Luca, if you think cheap audio interface converters are any different than what is in there...

Nothing stops you from trying...see how it fares, it did exactly that on my old Fostex 4 track and it worked if you want to apply effects, what you're applying to is the already miked signal, so it sounds a little different but who knows, you might get some good tones that way.

There might be a way to playback the already recorded audio from say track1 through the fx loop or the unit's output, then apply the fx chain and bring back on a second track which is muted not to bleed into the main channel which you're recording.

Standard old school 4 track practices which some of the youngsters seem to lack
#11
Quote by diabolical
Luca, if you think cheap audio interface converters are any different than what is in there...
Not really.

Though I'm not talking about interfaces that cheap, even the mid tire Cirrus Logic's in a $150 unit though would be a noticeable step up.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#13
Well, I'll try something tomorrow and see how it goes.
I'd try it tonight, but I've had a long and busy day today.

I'll probably just write some code and/or work on a few PCB layouts.
Or debug a pedal.

I'm going into town on the 11th.
Maybe i'll stop by this music store i've done some work for in the past (amp, guitar, etc. repairs).
He has a room in the back where he does some mixing and mastering.
For who or what I dunno, but he has all the hardware I would ever need, and then some, to accomplish what I need to do.
If I'm lucky I might be able to trade the use of his recording equipment and his knowledge in exchange for me doing some repair work.

Until then, I'll see what I can do with what I have.
For starters, I gotta find that damn USB cable.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Feb 4, 2015,
#14
Quote by Spambot_2
The audio interface (sound card) in your laptop is the bottleneck.

To raise the overall quality, the most important thing to do is getting a decent audio interface.

Then, you need a reamping box and a basic one will work just fine, but you may prefer the features of a "fuller" one, say transformers to change impedance and other stuff that would mildly (arguably) improve the sound.


You mentioned about having a reamping box that makes use of a transformer.
Well, this was the first "DIY your own reamping box" that I came across:
http://www.diyrecordingequipment.com/blogs/news/15851716-how-to-build-a-diy-reamping-box

This was just the first one (and so far the only one) that I found, and it uses a transformer,
I of course do plan on looking for more way to build one.

When looking for instructions or tutorials on how to do something, I NEVER go with the first thing I find, unless after searching and finding other examples of whatever particular bit of information information, it turns out to be the best of the bunch.

And I'm still gonna talk to the owner of that music store and see If we can work out a deal.
Maybe if am lucky and he has some broken stuff, we can help each other out.


Thanks for your help so far BTW. It is very much appreciated.

Edit:
And any other tips or words of encouragement are most welcome.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Feb 4, 2015,