#1
Hey guys. So i just got my first guitar, a used epi les paul std, yesterday and it was preinstalled with a medium gauge string set. It was put on poorly, with only 1 or 2 or even just half loops on the tuners. I decided to play it anyways. I noticed fret buzz on the first 3 frets on every string and all over the guitar (maybe everywhere). I was worried. Then, i decided to tune it up a notch, playing in G and the fret buzz seems to minimize. Still there, but smaller. The frets itself on the guitar seems not too worn. It looks okay, but not as shiny as a new one.

Is it a serious condition? Will i be able to fix it with proper stringing?

Thanks in advance!

The Guitar:






Last edited by stratos210 at Feb 2, 2015,
#2
What you're describing is nothing unusual. Your neck is too straight and it needs more relief. Loosen the truss rod 1/4 turn and see what happens.

The reason the fret buzz goes away by tuning to G is because you're forcing more relief into the neck by increasing string tension. By loosening the truss rod, you lessen the amount that the truss rod works against the neck to force it straight. Some relief needs to be there for you to have acceptable playability without fret buzz. So putting more relief into the neck is something the guitar is designed to do.

If you're not familiar as to what a truss rod is, how it works, and how to adjust it, I'd very strongly recommend to learn how. Its not rocket science and a part of the rudimentary set up of the guitar. So its in your best interest to know.

There are plenty of online tutorials that show how they work, how to adjust it, and how to measure neck relief. Here's a decent one.

http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/repair/acoustic-guitar/truss-rod.php

And if every fret on the guitar is buzzing, then your action overall is probably too low.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Feb 2, 2015,
#3
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
What you're describing is nothing unusual. Your neck is too straight and it needs more relief. Loosen the truss rod 1/4 turn and see what happens.

The reason the fret buzz goes away by tuning to G is because you're forcing more relief into the neck by increasing string tension. By loosening the truss rod, you lessen the amount that the truss rod works against the neck to force it straight. Some relief needs to be there for you to have acceptable playability without fret buzz. So putting more relief into the neck is something the guitar is designed to do.

If you're not familiar as to what a truss rod is, how it works, and how to adjust it, I'd very strongly recommend to learn how. Its not rocket science and a part of the rudimentary set up of the guitar. So its in your best interest to know.

There are plenty of online tutorials that show how they work, how to adjust it, and how to measure neck relief. Here's a decent one.

http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/repair/acoustic-guitar/truss-rod.php

And if every fret on the guitar is buzzing, then your action overall is probably too low.


Ahh, too bad he didn't give me the L key hahaha. Anyways, I've taken apart my guitar. I was thinking of cleaning it. The action on the guitar was pretty normal though. Not too low, but lower than an acoustic guitar I have at home. But I have never played an electric so, I guess I should increase the action. Does the fret look bad to you though? The nut?
#4
Your frets are slightly corroded and could use a polish (if you don't know how to do that, ask). The nut looks okay, but you can't tell much about that or the action without having the guitar in hand. The action on an electric SHOULD be lower than on an acoustic, generally speaking.

Almost every guitar can be set up to play well. You might want to start with a set of 10's on that guitar, tuned to standard, and see what things are like there before doing anything else.
#5
I agree, new strings, tune to standard tuning and see how it works before changing anything.

The link Toodeep posted is pretty good, check this one too.'

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/pagelist.html

Between them you can find a lot of good info on how to check things like nut height, neck relief, intonation, action and so forth. But get some new strings on there first, before trying to make any adjustments. You need new ones anyway.

I cut my strings about 1 1/2 inch longer than the tuning post, leave 1/2 inch or less sticking out of the hole, that generally gives me 1 1/2 to 2 wraps, which is plenty and I've never had any tuning problems stringing that way.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#6
Quote by dspellman
Your frets are slightly corroded and could use a polish (if you don't know how to do that, ask). The nut looks okay, but you can't tell much about that or the action without having the guitar in hand. The action on an electric SHOULD be lower than on an acoustic, generally speaking.

Almost every guitar can be set up to play well. You might want to start with a set of 10's on that guitar, tuned to standard, and see what things are like there before doing anything else.


About polishing... I've about it. Basically you get a guitar polish, cover your fret board and polish it up?

Quote by Paleo Pete
I agree, new strings, tune to standard tuning and see how it works before changing anything.

The link Toodeep posted is pretty good, check this one too.'

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/pagelist.html

Between them you can find a lot of good info on how to check things like nut height, neck relief, intonation, action and so forth. But get some new strings on there first, before trying to make any adjustments. You need new ones anyway.

I cut my strings about 1 1/2 inch longer than the tuning post, leave 1/2 inch or less sticking out of the hole, that generally gives me 1 1/2 to 2 wraps, which is plenty and I've never had any tuning problems stringing that way.


Alright then... I think i'll polish the stuff there for a bit and restring it
Last edited by stratos210 at Feb 2, 2015,