#1
I don't really know what to call this. But i was trying to learn night train and i can't get the part right after the intro to sound right. The chords seem to over power the rest of the lick to the point i can barely here the single notes i'm playing. Can any one help with this.
#2
Assuming that you're talking about the Guns n Roses song, it sounds like you just need to work on proper muting. The chords shouldn't be ringing out over top of the single note licks. Hit the chords for those parts, and make sure they're completely muted when you start playing the little lead licks.

If you're not talking about the GnR song... What Night Train you talkin bout?
#3
Quote by the_bi99man
Assuming that you're talking about the Guns n Roses song, it sounds like you just need to work on proper muting. The chords shouldn't be ringing out over top of the single note licks. Hit the chords for those parts, and make sure they're completely muted when you start playing the little lead licks.

If you're not talking about the GnR song... What Night Train you talkin bout?


yea i was talking about the guns and roses song i probably should have specified
#4
You'll need to accent the notes you are too quiet a bit harder, also, you might want to mix the amp EQ so the higher notes aren't drowned out by the lower notes, maybe bring the bass down, treble up, and roll the tone knob of your guitar up a little bit.

Edit - also, post above, yeah, I think Izzy plays the chords quite tightly, and mutes them there
Last edited by nargoth at Feb 3, 2015,
#5
I use two different techniques for this. When I'm backing up the singer I just barely touch the strings on my chords and rhythm work then I bare down on the strings when I'm adding a fill. I mute my guitar by laying my palm on the bridge saddle sometimes too. Then when I have the spotlight I turn on my compressor which I set up as a lead boost and let my guitar scream. We guitarists need to remember the average listener in the audience is listening to the singer. They consider us to be nothing but back-up.
#7
Quote by vayne92
If this is an EQ issue take a look at this video..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYtXBUS_kwY

EDIT: Just realized you're talking about GnR. Still a good video to look at though


That guy in that video knows what he's talking about. My favorite sound on an electric guitar is the "Stratocaster" neck + middle pickup combination sound. It has a beautiful tone in my opinion. I tried to use that sound professionally for a few years. But the truth is my guitar was barely being heard at all. The sound is too bassy to be heard when playing with drums and bass.

I always hated the sound of a "Telecaster" but now that's the only guitar I would get up on a stage with. That Bright mid-range sound stands out in the mix and nowadays I get compliments on my sound all the time. In fact I have young guitarists asking me how I get it.

The last band I played with has a Keyboard player who is a really good musician. But he always used that full-bodied sound that sounds good to him when he's playing alone. His keyboard always sounded muffled.

I would definitely suggest everybody watch that video. The guy really knows his stuff.
#8
I was only able to watch part of the video, my internet keeps dropping out.

Anyway this guy is right, from the half of it I heard. I found the same thing doing classic rock years ago. The sound I got from my distortion pedal (Ibanez SD9) was great at home, same for the distortion channel of my amp, a Peavey MX. Onstage both sucked, I was getting lost in the mix, muddy as hell, leads wouldn't punch through the mix...

One night I decided to dial the gain on the SD9 down a little, didn't need much distortion for that song. Everything came together perfect, I was even able to back off the highs a bit and start using the middle pickup a lot more.

With a band you need a lot less gain and saturation than you think. Now I very rarely use the distortion pedal at all. I've had to switch to a Boss pedal since the Ibanez is having trouble, but it does a good job, I mostly use the overdrive pedal now, a Marshall Bluesbreaker I've had about 20 years. I don't even turn the gain on it up all the way, it sounds great and no matter what I do I can pull back the volume and get a good rhythm sound during the vocals, step on the volume pedal and stand out for leads and even get my '74 Fender Champ to sound good. I use it onstage a lot because we play a lot of very low volume venues.

Cut back on the gain, push the mids a little, make sure your treble is not over the top, and cut back the saturation. Saturation makes it muddy in a hurry. Mids accent the bass, push the mids a little and you can dial the bass back some, get a full heavy sound without getting muddy or flabby.

During the vocals cut back the volume and distortion a little, the singer MUST be out front in the mix, NOT your guitar.

Use a volume pedal. I won't play without one. It gives me excellent volume control, I don't have to stop playing to adjust volume, and I don't lode some of the highs like dialing back the volume knob on the guitar does, because I'm still using the full pickup output. It took me about a month to get accustomed to it, now I'm lost without my volume pedal. I'm trying to fix a Morley now so I can try it out.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...