#1
I'm working my way through William Levitt's Modern Method for Guitar 1 and I'm attempting to transition from open position to 1st position for reading notes. Before picking up this book I learned all of my scales using three notes/string moving up the fret board for the high E and B strings. Of course, Mr. Levitt's training for scale patterns is very different. My question is, does it really matter if I use what I've already learned vs. how he's teaching it? I know there are a lot of variations in how to play a scale, but is one way better than another when it comes to reading music? Is this the "correct" way to play scales?
#2
No. 3nps is incredibly useful for legato and anything 80s related, provided you have the whole fretboard down.

Leavitt's scale philosophy is that you should be able to play a two octave scale off any note on the two lowest strings IN POSITION. That means one finger per fret, with your first and fourth fingers covering the two frets out of position.

The ability to stay in position and play any mode off any root (trying playing all 12 major scales while staying in one position, its a workout) is not only an amazing reading tool, but plays a big part later when you combine all this knowledge to unlock the fretboard.

TLDR: There isn't really a right way, provided the technique is efficient. It won't make you worse, learn it.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#4
Yeah np.

If nothing else, you'll find that Leavitt's positions are just the same shapes you know, with a certain string having 2 notes instead of 3. This is actually a very efficient way to connect 3nps positions.

Leavitt was a monster guitar player and an even better teacher. Some of his material may be a bit dated (there have been HUGE advances in electric guitar playing since his method was released), but the book is a gold mine, especially for sight reading.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#5
That's a relief. I guess I'm over thinking it. Yeah, I'm finding it challenging so it's keeping me engaged. The music is new to me and not the old fart music. The CD lessons that came with it help too. I started with Mel Bay's book and got half way through it before starting with Levitt's. It's a good thing I did, though, because I would not have been able to start with Levitt's without the more basic Mel Bay. It basically picks up on page 1 where I stopped in Mel Bay's. Thanks, again.
#6
Yep, all the music in the book was written by Leavitt himself so that there was zero chance of anyone reading anything they already knew before hand.

That's nothing though, you should check out the Melodic Rhythms for Guitar book. Also all original material, and supposedly Leavitt wrote it in one afternoon on lunch!!!
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#7
Most of em are straightforward, the only ones that might give you trouble are Ionian and Mixolydian. There is no set minor box for them since they are inbetween modes. Look at the modes next to them and thats how you'll know what to use.70-417
#8
I went ahead and ordered this along with his classical picking and reading studies. I'll let you know how it goes. Thanks for the advice.