#1
I recently bought a used Epi LP for quite a high price because it's rarely used and the finish was perfect. No scratches, no dings, only it looks worn but that's it. However, it suffers from fret buzz from nearly all over the place. The first 3 frets have the worst fret buzz. I've tried adjusting the truss rod and increasing the action to a crazily high height but alas, they have failed.

Here's a pic of the first fret:



I suspect the scratch there is what is causing the fret buzz, as opposed to "hitting the other fret" type of thing.

Wurst comes to worse which then comes to worst, I might re-fret the whole guitar (or at least most of the frets). And the total cost would be significantly higher than a new Epi LP, higher than a Gibson Les Paul Standard or a mercedes benz!!!!!1!!1 (just kidding, it's the stress talking)... I feel stressed... I feel like crying @_@

What do you guys think?
#2
Calm down and stop panicking. You're overreacting. The problem could be very simple.

And stop making threads on the same topic. Its against the rules.

You're not telling us very much information to diagnose your issue. Tell us, what is the neck relief of the guitar at the 7th fret? What is the guitar's string height at the 12th fret, low E to high E? Give us actual measurements. If not, send pics of the string height at the 12th. How much fret buzz is actually there? Please upload a video or a sound sample of the problem area if at all possible. A very small amount of fret buzz is generally acceptable, but difficult to quantify without sound samples. Only fret buzz that affects the tone of each note a significant degree is considered an issue. The amount that's acceptable is subjective.

If the string height and the neck relief of those measurements check out, then I'd take the guitar to a tech and have him diagnose the issue. IF the guitar is set up reasonably and there's still a lot of fret buzz, then consider having the frets dressed, crowned and polished if there is evidence that the guitar needs it. Refretting is totally unnecessary. Refretting only needs to be done if the frets are worn to the point of being irreparable. Which these are not.

Does the fret buzz decrease significantly once you hit the 4th fret? If that's true, that indicates that the 4th fret is high and choking out the frets behind it. In which case, take the guitar to a tech.

That 'scratch' you see on the fret is just the area where the string contacts the fretwire. It looks out of place because the frets are very tarnished, and the string has abraded the tarnish away with use. Nothing a bit of polishing cannot iron out.
Quote by Axelfox
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Feb 4, 2015,
#3
Toodeep is right, no way I would refret with frets still that big. You refret when there's nothing left to work with, about 1/4 of what you have there. Those have probably never even been dressed the first time, and jumbos can usually handle 3 or 4 dressings before they get worn down enough to even think about refretting.

Look up the info on

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/pagelist.html

to check neck relief (truss rod section) and nut height. Fret buzz on the 1st few frets is either what toodeep said, a high fret at the 4th, or the nut slots are too deep and the nut may need to be replaced. But you have to find out just what's wrong first.

This is a good reference site too

http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/repair/electric-guitar/index.php
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#4
Quote by Paleo Pete

to check neck relief (truss rod section) and nut height. Fret buzz on the 1st few frets is either what toodeep said, a high fret at the 4th, or the nut slots are too deep and the nut may need to be replaced. But you have to find out just what's wrong first.

The nut has no effect on fretted notes.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Feb 4, 2015,