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#1
Hey all!

So, I never was really into punk music but in the area I grew up most of my friends (if not all) did. Pretty much the only two music scenes my area had was Punk and xHCx. I had friends into both groups and one group always hated the other but I remained neutral because that's just who I am. I don't discriminate music/art.

The years went by and I'm still in the same area but have lost contact with a lot of people who once lived here. I have noticed that there is almost no music scene here now. For any genre. Some surrounding areas have shows but they seem to be for more metal crowd.

My question is, are your guy's area the same? Like is the punk genre still strong in some places? Or has the community as a whole dwindled down. Seems like its live music in general though.
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#2
There's a punk scene in vegas that's going strong but once I finally started going out to a show or two, I realized that it's basically the same people who've been doing this for like 10-15 years. And most of them suck.
#3
Punk had a bit of a revival in the 2000's but people weren't doing anything new and pop punk became so generic they all merged into one band. Typically punk has it's biggest surge when there is a state of social/political unrest (you need something to be angry at) so at the moment it's not too bad. Truth is it's just not popular at the moment.

A lot of music scenes have become fragmented in to small subcultures, too small to form a significant scene, so it's become more generalised. There are pros and cons to this but overall I think rock music in general is in quite good shape at the moment.
#4
Quote by JKing138
Typically punk has it's biggest surge when there is a state of social/political unrest (you need something to be angry at) so at the moment it's not too bad.

ok, if that is what helps you fall asleep at night.
#5
Interesting.

Are you guys still into the music? I remember some of my friends were so die hard that they would not listen to anything else. But, I feel as everyone gets older its harder to find people still like that. Was not trying to stir anything up by any means, just wondering how the punk scene is in other communities because my area seems pretty dead and its a shame.
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#6
Ocean County New Jersey consists of generic pop punk trash. For every 10 bands, there's about one that actually does something listenable.
#7
Absolutely.

Years ago, local punk shows around here actually attracted a lot of different people and you could meet all these people who weren't in bands or were just weirdos on the fringe. Go to a show now, and it's just the other bands watching each other play.
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#8
Damn this thread is awesome.
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#9
UK has one hell of a strong punk scene, heavily emo influenced.
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#10
Yeah agree there is a good punk scene here in the UK, if we're talking in terms of modern punk which, as ChemicalFire said is quite emo influenced.

In terms of punk and hardcore scene in the classic 70s/80s sense, there's still plenty of punks around but typically you have to look for them. Go see Stiff Little Fingers, Discharge, The Buzzcocks or any other band from the original punk era that are still playing and you'll be surrounded by leather jackets, Doc Martens and mohicans! And that's just about anywhere in the UK. I've seen punk bands in cities including Manchester, Stoke and Wolverhampton and also in small places such as Hebden Bridge and Holmfirth. Without fail, committed punks never fail to appear!
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Last edited by double0eck at Mar 18, 2015,
#11
Quote by Sleaze Disease
Absolutely.

Years ago, local punk shows around here actually attracted a lot of different people and you could meet all these people who weren't in bands or were just weirdos on the fringe. Go to a show now, and it's just the other bands watching each other play.

i stopped playing around here because every gig was for bands by bands. just too awkward imo
#12
Quote by -tempest-
i stopped playing around here because every gig was for bands by bands. just too awkward imo


That's how it is in my area too. Not punk as the scene has died out here pretty much but, the local shows here are usually supported by other musicians too.
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#14
The spirit of punk is alive and well. Look up Burger Records, and do some searching for all the people recording their own music thanks to modern technology. DIY is punk. Here in Portland, music is everywhere and I have trouble deciding which shows to go to on Friday nights.
#15
Quote by the glue man
The spirit of punk is alive and well. Look up Burger Records, and do some searching for all the people recording their own music thanks to modern technology. DIY is punk. Here in Portland, music is everywhere and I have trouble deciding which shows to go to on Friday nights.

this is cool and makes me want to move to Portland even more. (i hear you got good public transit)
mugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmug
#17
Yes. Punk is dead. So are all other music genres.
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#19
No, you're a towel.
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#20
There's a pretty good punk scene where I live, and I live in the middle of nowhere. The DIY scene in general is frickin' huge right now. If anything, I think punk is thriving.
#22
Am I the only one who sat back and said "this crap again" and then left.
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#23
As far as teenage culture goes, it's dead. Punk to them is Green Day and Paramore. I met a few teens in high school (just graduated last year) who listened to actual punk like The Ramones and Operation Ivy. But that was just a small crowd. What's extremely rare to find are teens who listen to hardcore. I swear I was the only teen at my school who listened to hardcore. Everyone else who claimed they listened to hardcore was just a poser who listened to nu metal, deathcore, or newer post-hardcore and electronicore bands. You had some who listened to melodic death metal yes, but the majority were the other styles. No one knew who Minor Threat was, no one knew who 7 Seconds was, no one knew who Converge was, etc. It SUCKED
#24
maybe if we keep saying its dead enough, something will happen. look at rock and hip hop
#25
"just some poser"
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#26
yes it's dead. dead, ****ing buried and now crawling around the world as some kind of post-apocalyptic zombie ****** begging for spare change.
#27
I'm sorry, but I'm surprised this whole "punk is dead" idea is a thing. I understand people saying "rock is dead"(even though that's not true either), but punks should know better. It's always been an underground genre. A lot of the pioneering punk bands didn't become well-known until years after they broke up. So doesn't it make sense to think that today's great punk bands are in the same situation?

I mean, people are saying it's dead because pop-punk was getting some radio play a few years ago. Are we really that threatened by it? Pop-punk is just one little sub genre. Sure, it's the most visible style of punk today, but that doesn't mean the other styles have disappeared. You can still find what you're looking for if you take the time to look for it.
#28
Quote by JKing138
Typically punk has it's biggest surge when there is a state of social/political unrest (you need something to be angry at) so at the moment it's not too bad. Truth is it's just not popular at the moment.


I'd say that there's actually a lot to be angry about. Growing wealth inequality, isis and global terrorism, political parties that are becoming more and more polarized and never work on anything together, superpacs and big money ruling politics, police brutality, violence against women in sports and on college campuses...there's a lot you could be upset about.

It's just not turning into much music right now. I mean, Rise Against is quite popular now, but aside from Rise Against the genre isn't as popular as it has been. Oh and I feel what you mean about pop punk. It's my favorite genre, but bands started off like skatepunk Descendents style stuff and slowly incorporated emo (not an emo or pop hater for the record, just in this instance...) and pop with pop becoming the dominant force until every song was pollished super slick and every band was singing with voices that sounded more like Glee than the Ramones. But in a way, that can be said of all music right now. The "pretty boy" voice, for lack of a better way to put it, has been in for the past 10 years. Compare the first 2 Good Charlotte records to anything All Time Low has put out lately. I chose those 2 to illustrate the change, as blink and Green Day became popular in the 90s. Both bands are very poppy and GC has turned into pop celebrities, but comparing the Young and the Hopeless to anything All Time Low has put out recently, the Young and the Hopeless still had rough edges to it that crossover pop punk has pretty much lacked ever since. Now that the genre isn't really that popular we will probably see things reverting a bit to being more rock based than pop.
Last edited by letithappen at Jun 4, 2015,
#29
Punk is dead where people are too comfortable to bother with it.

Here's some Indonesian punks that go hard.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Sbne-qCNzU
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#30
I've been reading a lot about punk bands and punk culture, and heavily participating in my local scene for a years now.

I can tell you that with "big" and "popular" (depending on your point of reference) bands like JOYCE MANOR and TITLE FIGHT, who reinvent themselves with every record, as well as the multitude of bands that spring up influenced by the aforementioned two, punk is far from dead.

One may have to look a little harder for scenes and broadening their scope of what "punk" entails, but I like to think that punk bands, scenes, labels, and punks themselves will continue to exist in underground scenes around the world.
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#31
You guys are all posers.

Posers.
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#33
I live in Wales Newport and pretty much all I see here is pretentious hipsters with there indie blues, country type music and then new metal type stuff. No punk scene which sucks as I think that would be where I would love to be at.
#35
Punk was huge here in Northern Ireland in the 70s. I mean, really huge! I wouldn't even say underground, not among teens & young adults at least. It persisted somewhat into the 80s but I don't think Hardcore really happened here the way it did in the US. A lot of the older punks here had left the country by the 80s (Ireland suffers enormous waves of emigration every decade), and post-punk and the like was bigger here. I mean, I wasn't around then so I can't say for sure, but that was my mothers experience. It was all Talking Heads and what have you.

So while in America and Europe you had a lot of things like squats and punk houses and stuff - which I know still exist in America at least, because a few of my homeless friends are only fed & sheltered cuz of them - you couldn't really have something like that here because of war. The paramilitaries always held a very tight grip on access and housing and what goes on in what area, etc. And if the paramilitaries weren't going to break kneecaps, the British Army would. So all of the punk networks were focused on getting out of Northern Ireland, not building a counter-culture inside it, or whatever.

There were a few, though. One in particular in Belfast, called Warzone, that sprung up in 1984. And they tried to do it all; they were a distro, a vegan cafe, a gig venue, a drop-in space, etc. It closed for a few years in 2003, but reopened recently. I don't know anything about it personally, and I don't know anyone who was involved. From some of their prints they look pretty cool, if a little corny,



but I was disappointed by what I saw on their facebook page. A couple of gigs with mediocre lineups and a March for Gay Marriage and some other soft-left liberal stuff. Nothing really challenging or relevant to the Northern Irish working class. Oh well.

As for the punk music scene, it's pretty much kicking around here. A lot of kids come up and want to play the Undertones and stuff. When I was 16-17 I drifted from punk band to punk band until I withdrew from the music scene altogether. Stiff Little Fingers are still playing, actually. I met the drummer who is a nice guy. In Northern Ireland punk still offers some hope to younger kids who don't want to be involved with paramilitaries, who don't care about King Billy or James Connolly, who don't find England or Ireland any more preferable rulers, who just want to play some music, etc. So in a lot of ways it's the same as it's always been. A little naive and a fair bit desperate, poor kids just looking for an Alternative Ulster :')
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#36
Quote by LauraMarx
Punk was huge here in Northern Ireland in the 70s. I mean, really huge! I wouldn't even say underground, not among teens & young adults at least. It persisted somewhat into the 80s but I don't think Hardcore really happened here the way it did in the US. A lot of the older punks here had left the country by the 80s (Ireland suffers enormous waves of emigration every decade), and post-punk and the like was bigger here. I mean, I wasn't around then so I can't say for sure, but that was my mothers experience. It was all Talking Heads and what have you.

So while in America and Europe you had a lot of things like squats and punk houses and stuff - which I know still exist in America at least, because a few of my homeless friends are only fed & sheltered cuz of them - you couldn't really have something like that here because of war. The paramilitaries always held a very tight grip on access and housing and what goes on in what area, etc. And if the paramilitaries weren't going to break kneecaps, the British Army would. So all of the punk networks were focused on getting out of Northern Ireland, not building a counter-culture inside it, or whatever.

There were a few, though. One in particular in Belfast, called Warzone, that sprung up in 1984. And they tried to do it all; they were a distro, a vegan cafe, a gig venue, a drop-in space, etc. It closed for a few years in 2003, but reopened recently. I don't know anything about it personally, and I don't know anyone who was involved. From some of their prints they look pretty cool, if a little corny,



but I was disappointed by what I saw on their facebook page. A couple of gigs with mediocre lineups and a March for Gay Marriage and some other soft-left liberal stuff. Nothing really challenging or relevant to the Northern Irish working class. Oh well.

As for the punk music scene, it's pretty much kicking around here. A lot of kids come up and want to play the Undertones and stuff. When I was 16-17 I drifted from punk band to punk band until I withdrew from the music scene altogether. Stiff Little Fingers are still playing, actually. I met the drummer who is a nice guy. In Northern Ireland punk still offers some hope to younger kids who don't want to be involved with paramilitaries, who don't care about King Billy or James Connolly, who don't find England or Ireland any more preferable rulers, who just want to play some music, etc. So in a lot of ways it's the same as it's always been. A little naive and a fair bit desperate, poor kids just looking for an Alternative Ulster :')

Thank you for sharing, that was very interesting.
#37
The hxc scene in my city is almost dead, there are like 4 bands left and they most only do gigs in bigger citys
I'm planning on starting my own band but first I have to find more people who are into punk and since everyone is into this edm shit it's pretty ****ing difficult
hi
#38
Quote by vfde213
I'm planning on starting my own band but first I have to find more people who are into punk and since everyone is into this edm shit it's pretty ****ing difficult


compromise, make some digital hardcore
Death comes as the harsh victory of the law of our ancestors over the dimension of our becoming ~monsieur dupont, Nihilist Communism

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#40
Quote by LauraMarx
compromise, make some digital hardcore

Just looked up that since I never heard of it.

I'm.... confused
hi
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