#1
Hello there UG

Ive been recently looking for long scale basses. All i have seen are 35" scale basses in local stores, the longest ones. There were a limited edition of 36" scale ibanez as far as i known, in 4,5,6 string variations. Where in EU i can get like 36" 4or 5 string? Anyone?
#2
Learn to use Google.
Try googlng: 36" scale bass guitar
Novak makes them, Thompson makes them, etc., but I have no idea what's available in the EU.

Please be aware that if you're downtuning bass and trying to get lower notes out of them, most speaker system will fail to produce a first octave harmonic, much less a fundamental of the open strings.
#3
I suggest contacting your local luthier for a custom build if you want a 36" scale bass.

Due to the other options like ordering from Carl Thompson or Vadim Rubtsov can get up to the five figures.
Damn it! Disable can't use disable to disable Disable's disable because disable's disable has already been disabled by Disable's disable!
#4
Those "extended scale" basses had a brief moment in the sun about ten years ago; not so much anymore. Carvin made at least one 36" (or was it 37") scale bass, but they discontinued it a while back. As others have said, you will probably have to go with a custom builder.

My current favorite bass is a 35" scale four-string Yamaha TRB-1004, and that extra inch on a four-string does make some fret spreads harder to do. With that in mind, I suspect that unless you have freakishly long fingers, a 36" scale bass would be difficult to play in the first six frets range.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#5
Just wondering if there was any particular reason why you don't want a fanned fret bass? According to most people who've played them, there's no extra difficulty playing them and it would be cheaper than to have someone custom build an odd scale length.
#6
Quote by CorrosionMedia
Just wondering if there was any particular reason why you don't want a fanned fret bass? According to most people who've played them, there's no extra difficulty playing them and it would be cheaper than to have someone custom build an odd scale length.


A fanned fret bass is a good suggestion. The only drawback to them is that they are (as far as I know) very expensive. The only production bass I know of that uses the Novak fanned frets is Dingwall, and their basses range in price from about US$1,300.00 for the most bare-bones model to US$AREYOU F%CKINGKIDDINGME???!!! for their really good ones.

Even the Afterburner series starts at about US$2,000.00, and these are their so-called "entry level; basses!
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#7
Quote by FatalGear41
A fanned fret bass is a good suggestion. The only drawback to them is that they are (as far as I know) very expensive. The only production bass I know of that uses the Novak fanned frets is Dingwall, and their basses range in price from about US$1,300.00 for the most bare-bones model to US$AREYOU F%CKINGKIDDINGME???!!! for their really good ones.

Even the Afterburner series starts at about US$2,000.00, and these are their so-called "entry level; basses!


Even though I'm currently saving for a Dingwall NG2, I have to agree.
I really hope the Ibanez SRFF basses are good because they're really cheap in comparison and hopefully it will get other companies to do the same, though if they really want to make a difference, the bass side has to be a little longer than the 35.5" the Ibanezes are currently specced with.
Last edited by CorrosionMedia at Feb 8, 2015,
#8
Quote by FatalGear41
A fanned fret bass is a good suggestion. The only drawback to them is that they are (as far as I know) very expensive. The only production bass I know of that uses the Novak fanned frets is Dingwall, and their basses range in price from about US$1,300.00 for the most bare-bones model to US$AREYOU F%CKINGKIDDINGME???!!! for their really good ones.

Even the Afterburner series starts at about US$2,000.00, and these are their so-called "entry level; basses!


Yeah, that's some crazy money for an "entry level" instrument. But it's just because the fanned frets are still a small niche kind of thing. Assuming they get more popular (and I sure as hell hope they do), demand will go up, import companies will start making them, and prices will plummet.
#9
Quote by the_bi99man
Yeah, that's some crazy money for an "entry level" instrument. But it's just because the fanned frets are still a small niche kind of thing. Assuming they get more popular (and I sure as hell hope they do), demand will go up, import companies will start making them, and prices will plummet.

That's Dingwall's entry level price point but they are not in any way shape or form "entry level" instruments. Their cheapest line, the Combustion series, is a line of Chinese imports finished and inspected in Canada (starting around $1300) and they're every bit the bass most American made or European made basses are. The ABZ, the lowest level of the Afterburner series (in the $2000+ price bracket) is all made by Dingwall in Canada and they are every bit a barebones "boutique" level instrument.


The cost/benefit of making non-fanned-fret extended scale basses goes down once you start getting much past 35". At that point you start getting into territory where such basses might be difficult or uncomfortable for people with smaller frames or hands, and it would be expensive for big companies to re-tool factories to make 36"+ scale basses in addition to their other lines when the market for them is very small. Carl Thompson and Fodera will both go 36" and above but they're very very very prohibitively expensive. I know Schack/Bogart have made a few in the 90's, and small independent luthiers will likely be able to build one, but you'll have a hard time finding one for an "affordable" price.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#10
Quote by Tostitos
That's Dingwall's entry level price point but they are not in any way shape or form "entry level" instruments.


Oh, I'm sure. It's just funny that anyone would even call that "entry-level", by any standard.

And yeah, that's the biggest thing keeping the price up. As it is now, there's almost no options for a mass-produced, mass-marketed multi-scale. And that's really the only way to get an instrument with a street price of less than $1000. Mass production. And for now, there's nowhere near enough demand for multi-scale for any huge companies to justify the cost of getting their factories set up for it, and building tens of thousands of them at a time.
#12
I wonder when the True Temperament frets will take the world by storm:

http://www.truetemperament.com/

If you want "as close to perfect intonation as is possible," then this is the way to go.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#13
I would love to try mulit scale, but its so expensive. Actually i dont mind long necks but prices and EU is like not much here to do.