#1
Hellos

I've been trying to experiment a little with putting an acoustic guitar through an octave pedal to get extra bass notes, but the results are always completely unbearably crummy - the pedal just can't figure out what to do with the signal and starts blurting low end noise. An electric guitar produces totally fine results through the same setup.

Now a cursory bit of online research reveals that nobody seems to have a solution to this problem, and lots of people have been having it. I can't really figure out what the problem would be though - it can't be the signal strength because the acoustic has active electronics, it should be plenty strong. Is it something to do with the kind of pickup the acoustic uses?

Anybody any ideas on what to do? Is it worth investing in an "electric-style" pickup to use instead of acoustic's built-in one?

Thanks guys
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#2
Quote by McTodd
it can't be the signal strength because the acoustic has active electronics, it should be plenty strong. Is it something to do with the kind of pickup the acoustic uses?
It could be the signal strength exactly because the acoustic has active electronics - you might be overloading the pedal's input.

The thing will most likely work if you use a passive magnetic p/up.

What guitar and what pedal are you using exactly?
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#3
Yes, I would expect an electro-magnetic pick-up to solve this issue.

But have you played about with the tone control on the electro? or maybe put it through a graphic eq first, with just the bass set high then re-mix it into another channel of your amp?
#5
Quote by Spambot_2
It could be the signal strength exactly because the acoustic has active electronics - you might be overloading the pedal's input.

The thing will most likely work if you use a passive magnetic p/up.

What guitar and what pedal are you using exactly?


aha, from what i read it seemed like the opposite problem.

another part of the problem is that the effect i'm using is the built-in octaver in a Zoom B1 which is, frankly, poo. i'm really just playing around though. I'll get a cheapo electro-pickup and see if there's any improvement. thanks a lot guys, appreciate it x
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#6
Just be aware that magnetic pickups designed for acoustic guitars are different from those of electric guitars, because of the differences in the magnetic properties of the materials used in the string windings. If you use an electric guitar pickup, you will need to used electric guitar strings to get reasonable string-to-string output balance.
#7
You might have more luck with an octaver that can track better too.

Maybe a digitech whammy 5 or one of the boss octave pedals.
#8
the issue may be that your guitars overtones are more complex than the pedal can really handle. pedal gets confused and you get noise.