#1
I want to do a recording that simulates a live arena environment, as if the listener were there. The drums are easy enough for me to do, it's the guitars that may be a bit of a trick. I want to mix a mono guitar track as if it's being blasted from two PA stacks on either side of the stage.

I imagine it would work like this: Two tracks using the same guitar part, both panned about 70% to either side. Each would have its own reverb and stereo delay echo, both set to slightly different values. To make it more realistic I could slide one track forward by just a few ms to replicate sound traveling unequal distances, and maybe even tune one side down by about 10 cents. EQing each side slightly differently might also help.

Thoughts/suggestions?
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#2
Use reverb to make everything sound more distant.

You def don't need to delay each track (or group) separately.
Think about how it works - everything is mic'd up, then sent to the FOH, then sent to the main speakers where everything is in time and gets a small amount of time to get to you.

Use pre-delay and reflections wisely.
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#3
Do you mean 4 guitar tracks? 2 per side? or 2 guitar tracks, 1 on each side? Either way, make sure not to copy and paste the performances, and to record both left and right channels separately. I would probably go for 1 guitar on each side, experiment with the panning.

Some subtle reverb should give it a more live feel. A lot of reverb plugins even have presets for that kind of thing, although i would experiment on my own for sure.

Honestly, a cheering crowd is often present in most live recordings and could give the illusion of a live performance if done well. Depends on the aesthetic your going for. Drums will sound slightly less powerful and rich than in a recording environment.

Compare some live recordings to studio versions of songs from bands you like to see the differences. Take a look at multiple live recordings if possible.
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#4
Quote by player o slayer
Do you mean 4 guitar tracks? 2 per side? or 2 guitar tracks, 1 on each side? Either way, make sure not to copy and paste the performances, and to record both left and right channels separately. I would probably go for 1 guitar on each side, experiment with the panning.


That's kind of the concept I'm actually not using. When I do studio stuff, I'll record a rhythm track identically two or four times and pan them side to side.

But in a huge arena, a mono track can sound wide just because of all the diffusion between the channels because of the air it travels through/the echo and reverb. That's what I'd like to simulate.

If all else fails, I can stack it.
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#5
Set up a two microphones in the room where you are mixing. Vary the distance of the mics for bigger or smaller effect. Set up two room mics. While the song is played back record the live mics on two channels. Be sure not to include the live mics in the feed to the monitors so you don't have feedback. Monitor through headphones and record. Vary the mic distances till you get the desired effect. The live mic tracks can be mixed in to the song and you get a pretty decent live sound.
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#6
Quote by Rickholly74
Set up a two microphones in the room where you are mixing. Vary the distance of the mics for bigger or smaller effect. Set up two room mics. While the song is played back record the live mics on two channels. Be sure not to include the live mics in the feed to the monitors so you don't have feedback. Monitor through headphones and record. Vary the mic distances till you get the desired effect. The live mic tracks can be mixed in to the song and you get a pretty decent live sound.


Live sound is huge. Bedroom sound is small.

Mic'ing the monitors will make it sound like you put microphones in a small room. It's a cool effect sometimes, but won't provide the size needed.

I'd still be curious to try it and see how it sounds, but I don't expect a big delay/reverb from it.
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