#1
Hi!
I am considering studying music in USA.
Im mostly into Rock, Funk, blues, soul, Pop, Fusion, Funk, Hard rock, metal
and have no interest in applying for schools like Juliard that
mostly focuses on Jazz and classical.

Im thinking about applying for Musicians Institute located in Hollywood, but
i am not sure my national loan system will support that school.

Does anyone have any suggestions about good schools
in USA that focuses more on modern/popular/rock music ?

Would love it if the school contains a good rock reputation like MI does.

Thank you!
#2
There's a school in Atlanta that has all that. Why don't you just go to MI in California? Definitely doesn't sound like you want to go to Berklee
#3
If you have no interest in doing a jazz or classical course, I wouldn't bother studying music formally. Just make a band you like and work hard on it.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#4
I have to agree with Alan here, a musical college is a bit much if you don't wish to learn such complex styles. Get a good teacher or go to an evening musical academy instead, something that you can run parallel to your other studies.
#5
While I would probably agree with the above, it would be unfair to give yoan answer without asking exactly what you want to get out of going to school for music and what exactly you want to do with it.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#7
If you have to take out student loans, don't go to music school. They will haunt you for the rest of your life. MI has a good program and grads come out with excellent chops but generally earn very low incomes that will never cover the loans.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#8
Great advice in this thread.

I'm assuming you take music very seriously because you want to get a degree in it, presumably so you can do it full time.

Unfortunately that doesn't gel very with with not wanting to do jazz or classical. If you want to be a pro, you have to be a professional about it. That means playing EVERYTHING.

The only place you will really be able to dodge any kind of jazz playing is Berklee or MI, and I can tell you that dodging Jazz at Berklee is NOT the way to gain any kind of competitive advantage over the 1500 other guitarists there.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#9
Thank you for the responses!

My main interest in attending a music college is to be in a competetive, and creative
environment where i am constantly improving, beeing inspired and have access to the greatest
equipment and music studios.

Im in interested in starting a band with people who share the same ambition and goals in music as i do.
Im sick and tired playing in bands for years with people who lack the passion, ambition and waste my time.
I want to find people to start a band with who really wants to make it.
I dont care about how shady, hard and ****ed up the music business is.

So to start a band is probably the main interest here where i am at the same time are improving
as a musician on all levels.
Just 4 years with hard work and hopefully ive found a dedicated band and become a greater musician with a lot more contacts in the business.

I know it sounds ridiculus to some of you to waste a lot of money on a music school to make it
as a band, but i do it for the contacts, location, equipment, teachers, to meet the right peoples to start a band with, become a better musician and learn from others.

Its a gamble, but Im not sure i will find the right people elsewhere as i havent for alot of years.
#10
I know a violinist who studies economics and she also says that most of her orchestra studies in a med school. And two of the best musicians from my high school went on to study medicine and architecture. I've also met a lot of people who are great musicians who have never studied music formally. Just saying that a musical college/uni does not equal great and like minded musicians.

It's your own choice in the end though. I know your pain about band hunting, and I know how tempting a music school is. Have you considered audio technology and production? If you go on to study music production, you could a) find all the contacts and musicians you're looking for b) Study music daily c) Have a degree that can actually make you money.

The problem with a musical school is that it does not support musicians who want to "make it". They might be expensive, and in return they give you a degree that is flat out worthless in the job market. Worst case scenario is that you complete your degree and then wind up unemployed because there are no jobs in that field.
#11
Quote by Flashphill
Thank you for the responses!

My main interest in attending a music college is to be in a competetive, and creative
environment where i am constantly improving, beeing inspired and have access to the greatest
equipment and music studios.

Im in interested in starting a band with people who share the same ambition and goals in music as i do.
Im sick and tired playing in bands for years with people who lack the passion, ambition and waste my time.
I want to find people to start a band with who really wants to make it.
I dont care about how shady, hard and ****ed up the music business is.

So to start a band is probably the main interest here where i am at the same time are improving
as a musician on all levels.
Just 4 years with hard work and hopefully ive found a dedicated band and become a greater musician with a lot more contacts in the business.

I know it sounds ridiculus to some of you to waste a lot of money on a music school to make it
as a band, but i do it for the contacts, location, equipment, teachers, to meet the right peoples to start a band with, become a better musician and learn from others.

Its a gamble, but Im not sure i will find the right people elsewhere as i havent for alot of years.


Again, you're better off simply starting a band and putting time into it. Studying music won't help you achieve this, and I garuntee that there are as many unreliable and awful musicians studying at MIT as studying other courses, or not studying at all.

These places don't garuntee success. Most of the students will never even join a band during their degree because they'll sit on their ass instead waiting for the right one to find them.

I understand you are having trouble finding good musicians to be in a band with. This is because most musicians are lazy. Keep looking and the good guys will eventually reveal themselves.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
Last edited by AlanHB at Feb 10, 2015,
#12
What Alan said.

I can PERSONALLY guarantee there are as many lazy, unreliable, and unprofessional musicians at Berklee as there are anywhere else.

There are plenty of good reasons to do music school, but doing it as some sort of "rock band fast track" is not one of them.

If you wanna go, be ready to do hardcore jazz and classical, as well as every other style you can name. Be prepared to do a lot of composing, playing, and producing in genres you don't even like (and ones you do).

If you want to go for a professional degree, you have to be a professional. Simple as that.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#13
While I agree with Jet that you should be open to working in styles you're not necessarily comfortable with and that music school isn't necessarily a "rock band fast track," I also think that these:
Quote by Flashphill
Thank you for the responses!

My main interest in attending a music college is to be in a competitive, and creative
environment where i am constantly improving, being inspired and have access to the greatest
equipment and music studios.

i do it for the contacts, location, equipment, teachers, to meet the right peoples to start a band with, become a better musician and learn from others.

are some of the better reasons for going to music school. Access to resources, collaborative opportunities, networking, being challenged, competitive yet supportive environment. All of those are good reasons. The whole "I want to start a band" isn't necessarily a great reason because you could do that anywhere. If that's the real reason you want to study then maybe reconsider, but if all the other stuff I quoted is true then music school could be a good experience for you.

And there are definitely schools that offer what are sometimes called Industry or Contemporary programs, which means you're more focused on pop styles (i.e., everything that isn't Jazz or Classical). I don't know of any or really what they entail because that's not my world at all, but they definitely exist. We're passed the time where going to music school means studying exclusively Jazz and/or Classical. I've heard kind of sketchy things about MI though. I'd tend towards going to an actual University.

Don't go to music school if you want to be able to say "this degree will make me soooo much money" at the end of it. That's not the point of it, like at all.

Also where are you from and why are you intent on going to the US? School is ****ing expensive in the US and there could be better alternatives closer to home and for less money. Especially if you live in the EU/EEA.
#14
I have a bunch of friends who went to different music schools, and some of them loved the experience.

But yeah, look, if what you want to do is find great guys to form a band with, then move to a city where there is a vibrant scene in the type of music you want to play and immerse yourself deeply into that scene. You'll eventually meet and make friends with the kind of people you want to be in a band with.

A special word of caution about schools like MI: it's for-profit music education. Any sort of for-profit arts education needs to be approached with a high degree of skepticism. Now, I know some talented and hardworking people who went to MI, but the simple truth is that those schools let in nearly everyone. Unlike Berklee or Julliard, where getting in really means something, with most for-profit art schools, getting in just means that you applied and met some very low basic threshold.

You can still get a great education and have a lot of great experiences at places like that. But approach with caution.
#15
Alternate plan "B"

Pay your own way to go to a JC majoring in communications and minoring in music. Same access to other musicians, studios and mentors, a degree path that can result in a decent job in a related field when you graduate, all at about 1/1000th the cost of MI with no loan sharks hunting you for the rest of your life. Study M-F and gig the hot spots on weekends.

This is a variation on what I did many years ago that put me in the room with Van Halen in Gazzarri's Hollywood and allowed me to share the stage with Bill Medley of the Righteous Bros for several shows. I also learned the language of music so I could communicate more effectively with drummers, keys players and vocalists. I managed to live fairly well and paid for all my gear with gig money. Zero student debt. Didn't get much sleep though.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#16
I agree wholeheartedly with JRF.

The networking is invaluable, but trying to be the guy who only does his own creative thing to the exclusion of everything else is not the path to victory.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#17
Quote by Flashphill
Hi!
I am considering studying music in USA.
Im mostly into Rock, Funk, blues, soul, Pop, Fusion, Funk, Hard rock, metal
and have no interest in applying for schools like Juliard that
mostly focuses on Jazz and classical.

Im thinking about applying for Musicians Institute located in Hollywood, but
i am not sure my national loan system will support that school.

Does anyone have any suggestions about good schools
in USA that focuses more on modern/popular/rock music ?

Would love it if the school contains a good rock reputation like MI does.

Thank you!


I've been to MI and it's awesome. But the same as with all other things in life, you need to know what you want. If you just go there and say... ok i wanna be better, you will have hard time at MI. There's so much information and so many teachers and students and everything that you really need to know what you want.
#18
^^^ Did you find that going to MI helped you become a successful musician Jure?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#19
Yeah. I get that the loan and all he fundings for a music school is expensive. I get that there is no job opportunities after a degree in music at MI or any other school. I get that the loan will haunt me. My local loan system suppots the school and im gambling on getting a scholarship there as well.

Ive thought about getting a degree in music production/sound enginer instead , but i know that is very hard to earn a living from as well. Almoast as hard as making it with a band.
the sound engineer/producer field is very competetive as well. Many do that and
i believe you gotta have passion for that and really love it to survive in that field.
So i am unsure.

I dont do this for money at all. I have no idea or plan for what will happend after i finish there if i start there.

Its more about like i said the competetive enviornment, all the access to dedicated musicians, teachers, gear, studios, and last and not least the great location. Hollywood. The center of the entertainment business.

So hopefully after ive attended that school (If i do), i had a great experience, have a lot more contacts in the industry, im a better composer, better understanding of the music industry, im a better guitar player and hopefully ive found a great band with great potential. Also to emphasize the location, there is musicians everywhere in hollywood, not only at the school. So if i dont find musicians for a band at the school then i will find them in LA, after giging around and get to known people in the school and outside the school.
#20
We all want what we want. Figuring out how you are going to eat after graduating school is always worthwhile to consider though. Good luck!
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#21
Yeah, it's not our job to tell you what you should do with your life. If you think that it's a good idea go for it, I'm pretty sure that it would be an amazing experience. But think it through before you act though, if you really have no plan on what to do if you don't succeed as a band a musical school just might not be what you're after. If you're willing to work as a session guitarist or a concert guitarist or a teacher you might benefit from it more, since those are the kinds of jobs you'll study for. Just don't rush the decision and regret it later.