#1
I'm trying to cover a song.
Like a Legend: http://youtu.be/t6MIE5hrZFk
From a video I saw (http://youtu.be/qoyJO9w6-jc), the guy was playing it like:
Verse: F G Em A G, F G E A G, F G
Chorus: C Em7 F C, C Em7 F C, C Em7 F C
Chorus Ending: D# F G G
Verse: F G Em A G, F G E A G, F G
[...]
F -> 1 3 3 2 1 1
G -> 3 2 0 0 3 3
Em -> 0 2 2 0 0
A -> x 0 2 2 1 0
E -> 0 2 2 1 0 0
C -> x 3 2 0 1 0
Em7 -> 0 2 0 0 0 0
D# -> x x 5 3 4 3
-----
Ok! This doesn't sound bad when I'm playing along the original song. But it sounds like C*** when I'm only playing the guitar.

I've recently found a video of the original author playing it live on accoustic:
http://youtu.be/L5fqB_mVaRQ
He seems to switch Em7 to G on the chorus, and he plays some chords I can't identify.

If someone can help, thank you. If not, thanks for reading it anyway.

[Edit]
It's an Am chord instead of A.
Last edited by ElectricToni at Feb 9, 2015,
#2
I played the chords along to the song and without the song and in both cases they sounded perfectly fine. What do you mean by it sounding crap? Do you feel like you're hitting the wrong chords, or does it just not sound the same?

EDIT: Um, your A chord as shown in the chart is actually an Am chord right? And he plays an Am in the vid as well if I'm correct. If you're using that shape anyway it should sound fine, just thought that I'd correct that.
Last edited by guitar/bass95 at Feb 9, 2015,
#3
Thank you for the fast response.
Yes, it's Am.
I don't mean it sounds like the wrong chord. It simply doesn't sound as good\the same. Especially the Em7 chord. Did you play it in the same shape as I do?
And also the guy on the last video (the author of the song) seems to play a G instead.
#4
Well, does it sound good with a G? Em and G are closely related, they're not completely interchangeable but in this case I think it sounds good either way.

You're also missing a lot of content playing only the chords, most notably the main melody of the song. A lot of pop songs are based on the same chord progression and playing only the said chord progression is not as recognizable as playing the lead melody. Due to this, a lot of different songs might sound exactly the same if you play only the chords.

You might be playing everything just fine, but maybe you aren't just used to hearing the chords on their own? To a lot of people the melody is the more familiar part of a song, and bare chords might sound odd. Just my two cents, I might be spouting nonsense but I hope I gave you some ideas.
#5
Verse: F G Em Am G F G E/G# Am G F G

Chorus: C G/B F C/E x3 Eb F G

Bridge: Am G F x3 Dm Bb7

Outro: C G/B Bb F/A Fm Bb C

That's what I heard.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Feb 9, 2015,
#6
I'm hearing a couple things a little different. In the verses at both places where it steps down from Am to F the chord between them is Am7/G: - 3x2010 or C/G if you prefer.

Then at the end it's:
C - x3201x
G/B - x2003x
Gm/Bb - x1003x
Am
G#
Bb
C
Last edited by stueycaster at Feb 9, 2015,
#7
Quote by ElectricToni
Thank you for the fast response.
Yes, it's Am.
I don't mean it sounds like the wrong chord. It simply doesn't sound as good\the same. Especially the Em7 chord. Did you play it in the same shape as I do?
And also the guy on the last video (the author of the song) seems to play a G instead.


That's not an Em7 chord. It's G/B. Don't play the E notes on the 1st and 6th strings.
#8
Quote by guitar/bass95
Well, does it sound good with a G? Em and G are closely related, they're not completely interchangeable but in this case I think it sounds good either way.

You're also missing a lot of content playing only the chords, most notably the main melody of the song. A lot of pop songs are based on the same chord progression and playing only the said chord progression is not as recognizable as playing the lead melody. Due to this, a lot of different songs might sound exactly the same if you play only the chords.

You might be playing everything just fine, but maybe you aren't just used to hearing the chords on their own? To a lot of people the melody is the more familiar part of a song, and bare chords might sound odd. Just my two cents, I might be spouting nonsense but I hope I gave you some ideas.


Well, it didn't sound bad playing G. Also from a practical point only, Em7 is quite similar to G, although theoretically I don't know why. And I can understand what you're saying about the melody. Sometime ago I found a video on youtube, with a guy playing 30 (I think) popular pop songs using the same 4-chord progression. xD

Thank you for you insight on the matter my friend.
#9
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Verse: F G Em Am G F G E/G# Am G F G

Chorus: C G/B F C/E x3 Eb F G

Bridge: Am G F x3 Dm Bb7

Outro: C G/B Bb F/A Fm Bb C

That's what I heard.


Quote by stueycaster
I'm hearing a couple things a little different. In the verses at both places where it steps down from Am to F the chord between them is Am7/G: - 3x2010 or C/G if you prefer.

Then at the end it's:
C - x3201x
G/B - x2003x
Gm/Bb - x1003x
Am
G#
Bb
C


Quote by stueycaster
That's not an Em7 chord. It's G/B. Don't play the E notes on the 1st and 6th strings.


I don't know how you guys can map out those chords so easily. Jesus!
I've really GOT to learn music theory. A LOT of music theory.
Thank you for everything. Maybe someday I'll be able to help other people instead of asking for help.
Thank you.
#10
Quote by stueycaster
I'm hearing a couple things a little different. In the verses at both places where it steps down from Am to F the chord between them is Am7/G: - 3x2010 or C/G if you prefer.

Then at the end it's:
C - x3201x
G/B - x2003x
Gm/Bb - x1003x
Am
G#
Bb
C

It is G major. Just look at his hands in the acoustic version (well, I didn't really need to look at his hands but that way you can be 100% sure about it). That's an open G major chord. Though I think Am/G would sound better.

You are right, in the acoustic version the chords in the end are C-G/B-Gm/Bb-Am-Ab-Bb-C.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#11
Quote by MaggaraMarine
It is G major. Just look at his hands in the acoustic version (well, I didn't really need to look at his hands but that way you can be 100% sure about it). That's an open G major chord. Though I think Am/G would sound better.

You are right, in the acoustic version the chords in the end are C-G/B-Gm/Bb-Am-Ab-Bb-C.


Yeah OK. It's a G. I guess I didn't pay close enough attention>
#12
^ Yeah, but as I said, IMO Am/G would actually fit it better than G major.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#13
Quote by MaggaraMarine
^ Yeah, but as I said, IMO Am/G would actually fit it better than G major.


Yeah I sometimes try to go with what I think it should be. There was this song I was doing with the last band I was in. It had the G step down to Em thing. I wanted the passing chord to be D/F# when it was actually Bm/F#. The Bm sounded awesome once I realized what it was.
#14
Hi guys! The cover is coming out quite nice . Thanks for all the help.
If I may ask another thing... If I was soloing over the verse chords, and the Emaj/G# came up, would I still use phrygian mode? Use it avoiding G and G#? Use it switching every G to G#? What would that mode be named? And if D# came up... Since it doesn't even belong in the key... what mode would I use? And as it's only used for a measure would it be a 'key change'?
Thanks
#15
Where did you get the phrygian mode from? The song has nothing phrygian in it. The verse is in Am and the chorus is in C major. Use A harmonic minor over the E major chord, and natural minor over everything else. And over the chorus use C major (which is actually the same notes as A natural minor). The ending of the chorus also uses one non-diatonic chord, Eb major. Use C minor over that.

I would suggest learning about keys and chord functions. They make everything so much easier and you don't have to ask these questions. When you see a non-diatonic chord (a chord that doesn't fit the key scale), it is most of the time either borrowed from the parallel minor/major (if we are in C major, you can borrow chords from C minor and if we are in C minor, you can borrow chords from C major) or it's a secondary dominant (when you use a secondary dominant, it's a brief key change - it's a dominant chord borrowed from another key, and most of the time it is followed by the tonic chord of the new key).

But first learn about diatonic chords. Learn what "in the key of x" means. Learn to hear the key you are in. Also learn what chords belong to what keys.

Forget about modes. They do nothing but confuse you. They are not the most important part of music. First learn about keys, then understanding the modes gets a lot easier.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#16
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Where did you get the phrygian mode from? The song has nothing phrygian in it. The verse is in Am and the chorus is in C major. Use A harmonic minor over the E major chord, and natural minor over everything else. And over the chorus use C major (which is actually the same notes as A natural minor). The ending of the chorus also uses one non-diatonic chord, Eb major. Use C minor over that.

I would suggest learning about keys and chord functions. They make everything so much easier and you don't have to ask these questions. When you see a non-diatonic chord (a chord that doesn't fit the key scale), it is most of the time either borrowed from the parallel minor/major (if we are in C major, you can borrow chords from C minor and if we are in C minor, you can borrow chords from C major) or it's a secondary dominant (when you use a secondary dominant, it's a brief key change - it's a dominant chord borrowed from another key, and most of the time it is followed by the tonic chord of the new key).

But first learn about diatonic chords. Learn what "in the key of x" means. Learn to hear the key you are in. Also learn what chords belong to what keys.

Forget about modes. They do nothing but confuse you. They are not the most important part of music. First learn about keys, then understanding the modes gets a lot easier.


Thanks a lot for the help and advices!