#1
Hey fellow musicians and music enthusiasts,
I recently arrived at college and among other qualms about my living situation I am not in a living space where I can blast my amp constantly (Fender '65 reissue Twin Reverb has no 'quiet' setting). On this tangent, I am looking for a certain piece of gear that I have no idea the name of but can only describe as I hope to be led in the right direction:

I am looking for a device that plugs into the amp input jack that will have a blue-tooth receiver built into this device so I can connect my blue-tooth headphones to this device to play through my amp with the sound input being received by my blue-tooth headphones.

Any ideas on if this product exists? If not i guess it's time to devise a prototype...
#2
Nothing like that.

You either get a load box with cab simulation and a headphones output (something like a mesa cabclone) or you get something like a line 6 pod.
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Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#3
I don't believe that exists.

However, things like the Zoom G1on/3/5, Line 6 POD etc include amp sims that will satisfactorily recreate your amp's sound and allow you to practice through headphones.

My personal preference would be the Zoom, but just as many people will prefer the POD.
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#4
If you think a bluetooth receiver (transmitter actually) plugged into the input jack is going to give you the sound of your amp then you are not schooled enough on these sorts of things to make a prototype. Get a modeler and be done with it. Nothing short of an isolation cabinet with mic is going to get the sound you like out of that amp while taming the sound levels.
#5
Quote by senathome
Hey fellow musicians and music enthusiasts,
I recently arrived at college and among other qualms about my living situation I am not in a living space where I can blast my amp constantly (Fender '65 reissue Twin Reverb has no 'quiet' setting). On this tangent, I am looking for a certain piece of gear that I have no idea the name of but can only describe as I hope to be led in the right direction:

I am looking for a device that plugs into the amp input jack that will have a blue-tooth receiver built into this device so I can connect my blue-tooth headphones to this device to play through my amp with the sound input being received by my blue-tooth headphones.

Any ideas on if this product exists? If not i guess it's time to devise a prototype...


Pod with a bluetooth headphone adapter. Leave the Twin home.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
Thanks for the replies, I wasn't exactly looking to get a great sound out of my twin just looking for a way to rig my bluetooth headphones to the amp so I can silently practice with the setup i would be using for band practice/gigs. What kind of tone should i expect to receive out of a modeler?
#7
The only one I've heard much is a Fender our other guitar player has. It's OK, but I've been a dedicated tube guy for way too long, to me nothing can match just plain tubes.

Some of the smaller practice amps have headphone hacks, I had a couple that did fairly good, but still kept going back to my '74 Champ. I'd say look into the Peavey practice amps, modeling or not, just make sure it has a headphone jack. Several companies make them, The only ones I'm familiar with are Peavey, Gorilla and Fender. My Peavey and Gorilla were both very good, but neither was a modeling amp. They sounded pretty decent through headphones, but I don't think anything is going to actually duplicate the amp you're accustomed to.

Best thing to do is take some headphones with you and try a few out.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#8
Using a modeler is going to give you much better results than trying to knock a twin down to headphone output, plus it's cheaper and simpler and will save your tubes.

It will take some getting used to, modeling technology still isn't perfect and headphones are a different experience than and amp through a "proper" guitar speaker, but modeling is the way to go for silent practicing.
#9
Quote by senathome
What kind of tone should i expect to receive out of a modeler?
As much as I like the Zoom G3/G5, it's probably the worst choice for modeling a Fender Twin. Either a Pod or Digitech RP would be a better choice.
#10
Quote by senathome
Thanks for the replies, I wasn't exactly looking to get a great sound out of my twin just looking for a way to rig my bluetooth headphones to the amp so I can silently practice with the setup i would be using for band practice/gigs. What kind of tone should i expect to receive out of a modeler?


Pod and Tonelab do Fender clean great. Both can be found used for around $50 for the simple bean or desktop Tonelab. They also do heavy OD pretty well but that "on the edge of breakup" blues tone still sounds best from a tube amp IMO.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Feb 9, 2015,
#11
Yea most of the modelers i've been looking at have seemingly been based for metal/heavy rock players; i'm looking more into the jam band/jazz/blues genre
any suggestions for a type of modeler to fit this style?
#12
Quote by senathome
Yea most of the modelers i've been looking at have seemingly been based for metal/heavy rock players; i'm looking more into the jam band/jazz/blues genre
any suggestions for a type of modeler to fit this style?


I've never seen a modeler that does heavy metal/hard rock sounds without also having some respectable cleans. Literally any of the big brand modeler pedals out there will work for you. The POD, the digitech RP series, the Zoom, the Vox Tonelab, whatever. They'll all get it done.