#1
Hey. I know the summer isn't for another 4 months, but I'm still worried anyway. This is going to be my first summer with my Electric Acoustic guitar and I'm worried that the glue may soften before the summer is over. During the summer, because we have no air conditioner, the indoor temps commonly reach 90°F and on occasion, probably once a year to once every other year, they can reach 100°F. We have never reached 110 indoors yet. Is this too hot, or will my guitar be fine? Thanks a bunch.
#2
Quote by ianhulett
Hey. I know the summer isn't for another 4 months, but I'm still worried anyway. This is going to be my first summer with my Electric Acoustic guitar and I'm worried that the glue may soften before the summer is over. During the summer, because we have no air conditioner, the indoor temps commonly reach 90°F and on occasion, probably once a year to once every other year, they can reach 100°F. We have never reached 110 indoors yet. Is this too hot, or will my guitar be fine? Thanks a bunch.

Remember, guitars are similar to people to the extent which, "it's not the heat, it's the humidity",which bothers us. So 90 degrees or so isn't the ideal situation, but it's manageable at humidity readings under 50% or so.

If your 100 degree temps are accompanied with 90% relative humidity, then there is cause for worry.

With that said, and without air conditioning, it follows that, "weather is something everybody talks about, but nobody does anything about".

If excess humidity is present, the quickest and probably cheapest way to deal with it, would be to keep your guitar in its case, and throw some packets of silica gel in along with it. That's obviously far from ideal, but it's all I got...

Assuming that excess humidity is present, if you have a smaller room that you could climate control, 5000 BTU air conditioners can be had for as little as $100.00. Of course, there's still the question of who would be paying the increased energy costs.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 9, 2015,
#3
If you have one of the sponge-type sound hole guitar humidifiers, they are supposed to work both ways and suck up the extra humidity if put in dry. Whether that's true or not I can't say for sure. 90 degrees indoors? Good Lord, I think I'd be more worried about myself than my guitar! lol Hope you at least have a fan.
#4
Quote by rohash
If you have one of the sponge-type sound hole guitar humidifiers, they are supposed to work both ways and suck up the extra humidity if put in dry. Whether that's true or not I can't say for sure. 90 degrees indoors? Good Lord, I think I'd be more worried about myself than my guitar! lol Hope you at least have a fan.
I think silica gel would most likely be more effective. That's why they don't pack sponges in electronic gear when it's shipped, they use silica gel packets instead..
#5
You don't mention which guitar and surely some are more delicate than others. I have gigged acoustic in 110F with both my Seagull and my Yamaha and both survived just fine. Modern guitars are built with wood epoxy which tends to be stronger than the wood itself so glue delam is not likely an issue. Wild swings in temp and humidity can cause cracks in the tonewoods so if you expect extreme temps, leave it in the case, in a shaded closet during the heat of the day.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
Quote by Cajundaddy
You don't mention which guitar and surely some are more delicate than others.


It's a T66ACE
#7
Dude, that piece is all plywood. I'm not saying it absolutely couldn't be damaged from the heat, but in all likelihood it won't.
#8
Plywood shouldn't be affected. The glue traditionally used in guitars is hide glue, which starts to soften around 140°F. That's car trunk in July temp. 100° shouldn't be a problem, as someone else mentioned, I've played gigs hotter than that and stored my guitars in a shed hotter than that too.

I don't know if contemporary manufacturers still use hide glue, but it has been used since before guitars existed mainly because it can be fairly easily heated and disassembled, repaired and reassembled, without ripping the wood apart like typical carpenter's wood glue will do. Basically everything about a guitar is built to allow for future repairs. Little can be done about shredding fret slots with a couple of fret jobs, but most everything else can be rebuilt with little damage, primarily due to hide glue.

But it won't let go in temps under about 140°...just don't leave it in your car trunk in mid summer...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#9
No need to worry. I've owned many guitars and never had heat be an issue. If it's getting hot enough to where the guitar is going to be damaged you, most likely, won't even be alive.
An escalator can never break, it can only become temporarily stairs.