#1
Hi guys,

I'm new to this forum. Been playing a long time now but never really got heavily into guitar set-up etc.
Currently using my old DK2M.
Standard hardware etc.

Problem I'm having is that when I depress the whammy bar, some strings change pitch more drastically than others...
The 1st string for example does not change pitch much at all.

How could I adjust each string individually?

Thanks Joe
#2
Welcome to the forum!

The bad news is that this forum, Musician Talk, is for the mental aspect of music making. things like theory, composition, and whatnot.

The good news is that I've moved this over to the Electric guitar forum (for all things related to the properties of the instrument), which is full of immensely knowledgable people who can solve your problem.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#3
What you're describing is normal and is part of the temperament of vibrato bridges (people call them tremolo bridges, but such a name is a misnomer) in general. the strings on a guitar when tuned to pitch are strung at different tensions to one another. And because the strings are also different gauges and are constructed differently (plain compared to wound), they have different degrees of elasticity. So some strings more than others are more reactionary to changes in string tension. Strings that have more elasticity (such as the high E) are affected less by moving the bar than the wound strings.

As you can probably guess, this isn't adjustable outside of adjusting string gauge. But I wouldn't go to the trouble of changing string gauge in a vain attempt to fixing a problem that is fairly trivial with a solution that isn't practical.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Feb 9, 2015,
#4
Quote by Jet Penguin
Welcome to the forum!

The bad news is that this forum, Musician Talk, is for the mental aspect of music making. things like theory, composition, and whatnot.

The good news is that I've moved this over to the Electric guitar forum (for all things related to the properties of the instrument), which is full of immensely knowledgable people who can solve your problem.



There's only room for one penguin in EG. I'm watching you, and your moved threads, buddy.
#5
I read the question, and I know the answer, and stopped trying to figure out how to explain it when I read this.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
What you're describing is normal and is part of the temperament of vibrato bridges (people call them tremolo bridges, but such a name is a misnomer) in general. the strings on a guitar when tuned to pitch are strung at different tensions to one another. And because the strings are also different gauges and are constructed differently (plain compared to wound), they have different degrees of elasticity. So some strings more than others are more reactionary to changes in string tension than others. Strings that have more elasticity (such as the high E) are affected less by moving the bar than the wound strings.

As you can probably guess, this isn't adjustable outside of adjusting string gauge. But I wouldn't go to the trouble of changing string gauge in a vain attempt to fixing a problem that is fairly trivial with a solution that isn't practical.


Couldn't have said it better..... no really, I don't think I could...
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#6
Ah OK, thanks guys! Good to know there are genuinely helpful communities out there for this stuff.
(Faith in human race +1)
#7
But having said that, if I dip the bar as far as it will go without forcing it, the 6th string and 3rd string seem to have the most slack. To the point they almost dangle from the neck. The other strings, not so much. Is that normal, too?
#8
Quote by Joe_Widdly
But having said that, if I dip the bar as far as it will go without forcing it, the 6th string and 3rd string seem to have the most slack. To the point they almost dangle from the neck. The other strings, not so much. Is that normal, too?


yeah. the tension isn't evenly distributed across the strings so some will slack more than others.
#9
It's just physics.

But IIRC, Steinberger has a vibrato bridge that changes the pitch of every string the same amount. I don't know how it's done, though.

Also, an easier way to achieve it is the Whammy pedal (but of course it can't replace a real whammy bar).

But yeah, most of the time whammy bars just work like that because of the reasons T00DEEPBLUE mentioned. It needs to be a special design to work the way you want it to work.
Quote by AlanHB
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Gear

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Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
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Yamaha P115