#1
Looking to posibly get a hot plate for my two amps. The first one is a marshall tsl60 set to 8 ohms running into 2 marshall cabs set to 16ohms. The second is a fender hot rod deluxe which I believe is at 8ohms mono.
Looks like the hotplates are set to a specific ohm setting 2,4,8,16 ect. My question is this. If I was to buy the 8 ohm version does it split the signal into 16 ohms when it goes out to the pair of 4x12cabs? That would be ideal so I could use it with my HRD as well
#3
I am completly open to suggestions, although I'd like to keep it under $300
#4
The input impedance is all that matters. If you have an 8 ohm amp, you plug it into an 8 ohm hotplate. From there it doesn't matter what the cabs are. 2x16, 1x4, anything goes.

Don't see a point in using an attenuator for a Hot Rod, or even the Marshall TBH. Attenuators are only decent for shaving a couple dB off of a really loud amp to make it bearable, and even then they're usually only worth it on non MV amps where you're relying on the power tubes. Anything with a master volume is almost certainly going to sound better with the Master lowered than hooked up to an attenuator. Something to consider before you drop $300 on a piece of gear that might not do what you want it to.
#5
Got one I would be willing to sell. An Altair Attenuator rated at 100w. I used to use it with a full sized rig but now she is collecting dust.

The trick with any attenuator is to use it to knock down the volume "just enough". They work great at -4, -8, -12db but go much further and they suck all the good tube tone you were cranking the amp to get in the first place. Most nights -8db was just right for my rig.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
Well I've never used one at all, so maybe I don't understand the proper use. I know this, at cranked master volume/channel volume/gain my Marshall sounds awesome! However my children dont appreciate how awesome it sounds, lol. So i would like to harness that tone at a volume that won't scare the kids. And as far as the HRDeluxe goes, I think it is even more of a candidate because I don't love the cranked tube distortion on the clean channel is awesome, yet it is soooooo loud!
#7
I agree the HRD is a good candidate because it is killer loud when cranked.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#8
Quote by vegetaof9
Well I've never used one at all, so maybe I don't understand the proper use. I know this, at cranked master volume/channel volume/gain my Marshall sounds awesome!


An attenuator puts a load (whether a wad of resistors, a speaker motor, a reverse amplification setup, etc.) between the output transformer and the voice coil(s) of your speaker(s). That circuit, from OT to Voice Coil, is part of the reason your tube amp sounds the way it does. The more an attenuator intrudes on that, the less your tube amp sounds the way you like it. There are usually switches on the better attenuators that attempt to restore lost frequencies, but overall, an attenuator simply reduces the overall volume while allowing the power tubes to run into distortion.

There ARE solutions (pricey ones) that do a better job of this. Check out the Fluxtone speaker website.