#1
Sorry if this isn't the best place to post this, but I'm trying to figure out the right equipment to buy to record my band's sets. We recorded from a gopro and a regular crappy camcorder and then I mixed them together and it didn't come out terrible but certainly far from looking/sounding professional.

I can edit fairly well, but I'm torn on two things. The first is whether to use the audio from a camera, or record audio separately and then add it to the video during editing. Obviously the latter is the ideal one, but how feasible/expensive is this for a local band? What are the options for doing this? I'm honestly not even sure how one would go about recording the audio with each instrument/drum on a separate track during a live show. Can anyone walk me through that?

The second is what camera to buy. When I was editing our last show I used the audio from the gopro throughout but mixed in scenes from the other camera. That audio wasn't terrible, but I've heard the Sony HDR MV1 is really good for capturing audio, so I was thinking of getting that (has anyone used it?) and just using that audio, unless someone can explain the last part and you guys think thats the way to go(with the separate audio recording). We don't need crazy professional videos, but we're a reasonably sized local band and just wanna record to put some stuff out on youtube and have the memories whilst still having the videos look and sound halfway decent.
Last edited by bloodandempire at Feb 10, 2015,
#3
I don't know about the quality on the zoom q2. But the zoom h4n is the industry standard in portable sound recording. You can use it to record your band as it sounds in the room with the built in microphone OR you can take a line out from your PA and plug it in, although the mix may not come out great if you do that. Then there's the zoom h6, which looks sexy as hell.

http://www.zoom.co.jp/products/h4n
#4
I use a Tascam US-2000 to record songs live. I've never done this at a gig but we have recorded for practices. You can record 8 mic'd tracks at the same time. Usually mic the 2 guitar cabs, the bass cab, vocals and use the rest for the drums. Of course you need to buy the interface (US-1800 also does 8 tracks simulataneously) and all the mics which can add up.

This would probably sound the best but its not the easiest way either.
#5
Does your mixer have a usb out? You could just plug that into a laptop running Reaper and theres your audio.
If you do that, adding a condenser for a room mic wouldn't be a bad idea.
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Last edited by jmaguire at Feb 10, 2015,
#6
Cool I'll look a bit more into the q2hd, but the h4n is only a sound recorder, I'd like to get video and sound as I'd also use it for youtube covers. My only problem with the interface/usb/laptop route is I wouldn't wanna leave my laptop with the sound guy while there's a bunch of kids jumping around...sounds like a terrible idea. Are there any other options for the sound part or is this generally the way people go? Good sig jmaguire
#7
http://www.zoom.co.jp/english/products/h1/

Simple to use so even your girlfriend can run it. Sounds great.
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#8
My only problem with the interface/usb/laptop route is I wouldn't wanna leave my laptop with the sound guy while there's a bunch of kids jumping around.


Won't the sound guy check his equipment if there are kids? What is the percentage of your gigs playing for kids? Quality wise, mixer to laptop is the best route and the easiest/ cheapest, since you may already own a laptop. You'll even be able to edit your songs track by track and remaster/remix.

Altought, the h4n is fine. Also you'll want your sound and video from seperate inputs. A moving camera will kinda screw your sound, so you want your mic still, and a still video is plain. Depending of the camera, mostly DSLR, the focusing motor is noisy and you'll hear some onto video.

It comes to how "professional" you want to make it. A Sony HDR MV1 could be great I guess, but it can't get you the "film look"(24 fps), and you'll be stuck with 2.8 aperture which might give you some hard times in low light conditions, a.k.a. any pub after 5.

I may add, even cheap DSLR will most likely give you more video quality. Moreover, you'll be able to control shutter speed and have the so called "Film look". Basically 24/25 fps and 1/50 1/48 shutter speed. It'll reduce grain being able to control ISO.
Last edited by Taz9 at Feb 10, 2015,
#9
During the past year I have done several live band recordings and there are several ways to go about it that won't break the bank. While I have the full rig to do multi track live recording (24 track audio workstation, 16 channel mic snake and all the added necessities for a very good semi pro recording) that's not what you need to get your feet wet. For about $100.00 I would recommend the Tascam DP-006. It is a small multitrack recorder that will record two tracks at a time. If your PA primarily runs just vocal mics you can run an output from your mixer to one channel of the Tascam DP-006 and use a room mic on the other channel to get the instruments. Take the thing home and mix the two track to mono and insert the audio mix into your videos audio track. It helps sync thing up if you clap your hands once before your start playing so the audio of the clap is on both the video and the audio recording. This makes it easy to line up the cameras audio track with the imported audio mix. With a Tascam DP-006 you'll also have a pretty nice deck for basic multi tracking and built in mics are pretty good.
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#10
I really don't think you should be too worried about your laptop getting knocked over or whatever. I mean, the mixing desk and all the stuff with it must be reasonably safe so your laptop should be fine. You couldn't even make a solid case for it to sit in while you record the sound.
It will really be worth talking to the sound guy and just plugging it in. The sound quality will be tonnes better and you'll be able to remix and stuff after if you like.
If you do go the room mic/camera route, you definitely want to have separate cameras and microphone. You'll want your video to be moving around and not fixed in the centre of the room, whereas you'll want your microphone to be placed pretty centrally and not having it moving around the room. That'll make your sound more consistent throughout the recording.

But yeah, definitely would work some sort of way of plugging into the mixer and recording from there. Even if you just got one of the mixer outputs and through an interface.
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#11
Well there's one venue we play at more than others because we know the owner and have been going to shows there a while so its kinda loke home base...anything wed record would probably be done there. The problem is the entire "sound desk" is fairly small and right off next to the crowd. I dont think a laptop would comfortably fit meaning it would be right on the edge and cramped and stuff. Combined with the fact that the sound guy there is kind of a dick(rude and seems to care more about gettig paid than getting the bands' sound right) it would make me nervous. Would it be possible to do that into a tablet or phone?

I already have a 2 input interface so i guess it would be feasible to do the room mic for instruments and direct vocals...youd presumably also get some vocals in the room mic...would you just overlap them?
#12
Would it be possible to do that into a tablet or phone?

At this point, even if you had an audio interface for your phone, you'd be better with a multi-track recorder.

Would you just overlap them?


Yes.
#13
What quality do you want to achieve?
I think it might be a good idea to hire one of the venues on a day off and use their stage and soundman, have him create a mix and then you film it, even on several cameras/smart phones. The audio from the film will sync in all of these later and can be edited, i.e. you use the quality audio from the board and use the crappy audio in the cams to sync up and do your edits. Having more than one angles and some time to do the edits can provide much better results.

Another option - one cam setup and a daw/multitracker, same approach - the good audio is recorded on the multitracker, the cheap audio from the cam is just used to sync.
#14
The microphone on the Q2 is pretty good. Here's a clip done by somebody just standing in front of the stage using the inbuilt mic.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-ic7Tf-wBd6R0J5aHBfMG5mMzQ/view?usp=sharing

As a device to make youtube type vids, it's not bad at all. Especially considering the price of it.
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#15
I'd just pay a professional, honestly. Guys doing video in the music industry are usually super cheap, as they're just building up a portfolio, or they're musicians themselves. More worth it to pay a guy $100-200 to record your show and edit everything together than it is to buy all the gear and learn how to use it. Chances are his camera and audio equipment are going to far outclass anything you'd want to spend just for taping shows, and you'll get a product you'll actually be excited to share.
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#16
That is certainly another way to go, Derek. However the Q2 only cost well under $200 ($95 IIRC) and we have it now. It all depends on how pro you want it to look. When we do a vid to go with the EP we'll probably go into the studio to do it - but for demo quality, the Q2 is adequate.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at Feb 10, 2015,
#17
Quote by diabolical
What quality do you want to achieve?
I think it might be a good idea to hire one of the venues on a day off and use their stage and soundman, have him create a mix and then you film it, even on several cameras/smart phones. The audio from the film will sync in all of these later and can be edited, i.e. you use the quality audio from the board and use the crappy audio in the cams to sync up and do your edits. Having more than one angles and some time to do the edits can provide much better results.

Another option - one cam setup and a daw/multitracker, same approach - the good audio is recorded on the multitracker, the cheap audio from the cam is just used to sync.


Hard question to answer, I'm not really sure how you'd quantify quality...However, I think you guys have helped with your advice enough that I know my options. So thank you! I think I'm gonna start with Taz's suggestion as it's one of the cheaper ones and I'll see how that comes out, then take it from there. Seriously, I appreciate the help from every single person who posted

Quote by MatrixClaw
I'd just pay a professional, honestly. Guys doing video in the music industry are usually super cheap, as they're just building up a portfolio, or they're musicians themselves. More worth it to pay a guy $100-200 to record your show and edit everything together than it is to buy all the gear and learn how to use it. Chances are his camera and audio equipment are going to far outclass anything you'd want to spend just for taping shows, and you'll get a product you'll actually be excited to share.


It's something I'm interested in. I love video editing and my band's shows are something I can edit that I'm already really passionate about. Nothing about this is about money to me(except not spending a lot to do this:P), I just want to have fun and learn playing music and recording/editing.
Last edited by bloodandempire at Feb 11, 2015,