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#1
Hi UG,

I'd like to know what are you guys point of view when it comes to buying new gear? Do you generally prefer to buy cheap, since as we know, there are pretty nice clones and cheap alternative that might do the trick sometimes. Or you prefer to buy nice and once and for all get what you really want?

I'm not really talking about used VS new here, more like "The real thing, Gibson les paul VS The less real thing, Gibson les paul studio".
#2
"if you're gonna do something do it right"
- every father ever since the dawn of time
mojostompboxes.com
#3
Quote by Taz9
Hi UG,

I'd like to know what are you guys point of view when it comes to buying new gear? Do you generally prefer to buy cheap, since as we know, there are pretty nice clones and cheap alternative that might do the trick sometimes. Or you prefer to buy nice and once and for all get what you really want?

I'm not really talking about used VS new here, more like "The real thing, Gibson les paul VS The less real thing, Gibson les paul studio".


They are simply tools so buy the right tool for the job. If a $500 guitar will take you where you want to go a $5000 guitar would be a waste of resources better spent elsewhere. If a $400 amp is built too cheaply and will fail often when you need it, better to spend more on a more durable workhorse.

Buying wisely often has less to do with brand name or price than one might think.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#4
Clones are great, but they don't quite cut it for me. I had a Mooer Green Mile. Basically a tube screamer, but it wasn't quite a tube screamer and it had a bacon frying high end sizzle to it. I did enjoy one setting on it. I used it as a clean boost, but it was way too gritty.

You obviously get cheaper components and a lesser build quality with clones. Mooer isn't even a good example because most of their pedals are around $88, some over $90. That's not really "cheap" when I could get a real TS9 for $100.

Honestly, guitar players are so nitpicky about gear and tone. Some people are going to prefer the Mooer Hustle Drive or Eno Trouble Drive to the Fulltone OCD and say that there's just not a big enough difference in tone to justify the price difference or in general, they like the way it sounds more.

For awhile, I was going to get a Mooer Ana Echo, a Boss DM-2 clone. They sound pretty close, but the DM-2 has been discontinued only to be reintroduced as an expensive Waza Craft model. Eventually, I went with a boutique pedal and have been satisfied ever since. I'd rather support a boutique company than support a Chinese company that pumps out mini versions of successful pedals for a fraction of the quality.

I'd rather invest in a product that I know has been QC tested and put together with quality components.

Or even better, I'll buy the high-end product used.
Fender '72 Telecaster Deluxe RI
Schecter C-1 Artist II
1978 Music Man HD130
+ a bunch of neat pedals

screamy emo band
#5
Quote by nick.culliton
I'd rather support a boutique company than support a Chinese company that pumps out mini versions of successful pedals for a fraction of the quality. I'd rather invest in a product that I know has been QC tested and put together with quality components.


the world needs more you.
mojostompboxes.com
#6
There was very good vid on buying guitars on another forum. The basic premise was "make a spec list of essential features". For example, mine might be:

Has to stay in tune
No spikes, skulls, ugly shapes, fancy wood, bright colours
Must be light
Must have P90s
Must feel comfortable

If you can get this for $300, great, but if it also has to have "Gibson" on the headstock and be genuine, I have to be willing to pay more.

I personally go in for cheap in electrics - they're just a fancy lump of wood to me - and mod them. OTOH, mostly high end in acoustics, as I'm fixated on the notion of repairability and durability. - Nothing much to do with tone.
#7
Quote by greeny23
"if you're gonna do something do it right"
- every father ever since the dawn of time


This. But, in our family, we have what we call "The Lesson of the Bose Speakers."

In the mid-1970's, my Dad was assembling his "dream" hi-fi system, and part of that was getting Bose 901s. However, he was running short of $$$ for the project, and instead of waiting until he could afford them, he bought some (very nice) Marantz speakers.

About 2 years later, he bought a pair of Bose 901s, and the Marantz speakers became end-tables until I commandeered them for my own stereo system. And I still own and use them. Those 901s died a few years ago...but Bose replaced them for the cost of shipping.

The lesson? Sometimes, despite what logic tells you, your heart tells you something else. If the urge is too strong, and you don't follow your heart, your misery won't cease until it is satisfied with "the real thing." And that could mean incurring all kinds of costs because you chose otherwise.

Applying this to the world of guitars, sometimes something that is less expensive or even made by another manufacturer will do the job, and for much less money. But if your heart is fixated on a particular manufacturer's product, no amount of logic and facts will dissuade you- you might as well pay the extra money and get the guitar you WANT rather than a cheaper one that- strictly speaking- still does what you need.

So, I will often recommend substitutes for pricer guitars, like Electra Omegas for Gibson Les Pauls. But if I see that someone is set on buying a Gibson, I won't bother, and instead will try to help them find their best deal on a Gibby.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Feb 12, 2015,
#8
"if you're gonna do something do it right"
- every father ever since the dawn of time




But, in our family, we have what we call "The Lesson of the Bose Speakers."


Silly!

Sometimes, despite what logic tells you, your heart tells you something else. If the urge is too strong, and you don't follow your heart, your misery won't cease until it is satisfied with "the real thing."


That's one thing I wanted to hear about. Very good point!
#9
Quote by Cajundaddy
They are simply tools so buy the right tool for the job. If a $500 guitar will take you where you want to go a $5000 guitar would be a waste of resources better spent elsewhere. If a $400 amp is built too cheaply and will fail often when you need it, better to spend more on a more durable workhorse.

Buying wisely often has less to do with brand name or price than one might think.


I'm pretty much in this camp. I learned long ago that sometimes you're just spending money for the name and sometimes you're not. But I also learned that it's better to buy once.
#10
I weigh both pretty equally and value has a lot to do with it. I like sounding good and good quality gear, but at the same time I'm not a touring musician and have never made more than $40 and free beer off a gig. I'll probably never own a legit Goldtop Les Paul but the Agile Goldtop I have is a hell of a player and I'm content with it. I wouldn't bother paying $100 for a reverb pedal when a used Quadraverb costs $75, tops. If I want a certain gain pedal, I'll check with a shop near me to see if they wanna build it, it's never cost me more than half the price of the name brand version. But I also have no qualms with being late on rent to score a guitar I just had to have.

.
Fender Mustang/Derfenstein DST> Boss Power Wah> Pedal Monsters Klone> Bogner Uberschall> Walrus Audio Janus> Randall RM20> Line 6 M9> Randall RM20
#11
Depends on how much money I have balanced against how much I need it.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#12
Quote by greeny23
the world needs more you.


Thanks.

Just last week I bought a used Boss CH-1 after debating the ****** Tutti Love (which is a terrible, terrible, terrible name for like, anything) and Mooer King Ensemble. Couldn't be happier with the fact that I went with the Boss.
Fender '72 Telecaster Deluxe RI
Schecter C-1 Artist II
1978 Music Man HD130
+ a bunch of neat pedals

screamy emo band
#13
Quote by Cathbard
Depends on how much money I have balanced against how much I need it.
c:

If you know how to research, you can buy gear that is cheap and also of reasonably high quality. You don't need a bunch of Berry pedals and squire guitars for budget st00f. Eventually, your initial low-budget investments will help get you high-budget investments.
#14
Everyone has an opinion, and in this case they are ALL right. There are a lot of answers, suggestions, perspectives that contribute to this idea. The value of something is not necessarily the same as the price tag. Just look at where you buy it. I can go to the local music store and pick up a new Mustang 1 for $120. But I can buy it online for $100. If I find the added value of local support and instant gratification, the higher price is supported, but that doesn't mean the product is worth the higher price in all scenarios.
The value of money to you is also a critical factor. For some people, $20 is a lot of money, to others $100 is a drop in the bucket.
The one factor that weighs heavily with me is the over valuing of brand and model. I love the idea of Gibson guitars, and the Les Paul has a great history. But I will never be able to justify the additional $1000+ premium you have to pay for the name. But if the name and reputation is important to you, you have to assign a dollar value to that factor. There is a lot of information out now (as compared to pre-Internet days), and many would suggest that you can get equal or better components and materials at a fraction of the cost of premium brands. Some have even pointed out that you can find imported gear that is equal or better than their American models.
This brings up another point of value: made in the USA. I do put a bit of value in that. I don't believe that I should have to pay double, but I will pay more for something simply because it was made here. (Or in some cases in another country with high regards for the particular product).

So it is not a simple answer, but there are many great variables that people can contribute that will help others decide on how to purchase.
#15
It makes sense to buy good quality things, dependable things.

But, there are a lot of different circumstances under which people live and these circumstances make it possible for them to buy only cheap guitars, amps, etc. Some of these over riding circumstances might be a wife, zero disposable income, a girl friend, etc.

The goal always should be to buy good quality things though, and to try to persevere in the face of obstacles. Getting a job might be something to do. And of course there are other things that can be done regarding other circumstances, needless to say.

Good luck man. Try your best to get good quality things.
"Now all the things that use to mean so much to me have got me old before my time." G. Allman, "Old Before My Time", Hittin' The Note cd.
#16
Good luck man. Try your best to get good quality things


I feel very supported. Thanks! No need to wish me luck, but I'll take it.

Everyone has an opinion, and in this case they are ALL right.


Yes!
#17
The way I look at it is this: I personally don't care for boutique or high-end gear MOST of the time. My ear just isn't sensitive enough to tell a $200 "Made in USA" (as if our economy is failing because of off-shored guitar pedals) tube screamer clone from a regular $99 TS-9.

BUT, I get tired of gear very quickly and sell/trade often. Because of this, I have to consider other people's opinions of the gear I buy. I see people all the time saying "I have x for sale, also willing to trade for Les Paul, but not a Studio" as if it's not a real Les Paul or something. So with this in mind, I try to buy stuff that I know will be easy to get rid of, if/when I decide to do so.
#18
Get what you know you need. Pay whatever that costs.

I can't tell the difference between the golf ball I found in the lake, and the most expensive ball on the market, so I don't give a shit what my ball is like. But Tiger woods does.

If a piece of gear is the factor that is limiting you, that's a problem imo. There's also no point in getting something that's way beyond your level.

So, forget the price tag, forget what other people tell you. Just go on your own experience. Try stuff out, listen to stuff yourself, and pass your own judgement. That will make sure you get what you need. for some stuff it's good to inform yourself, like knowing features something has, like buying a loop pedal or something. But if you're buying a guitar, just trust yourself. Start small, when you need to upgrade, you will know it, and you will know exactly why.
#19
Quote by Cathbard
Depends on how much money I have balanced against how much I need it.

Quote by DuffB
It makes sense to buy good quality things, dependable things.


Both of these. It's a mix of things that comes into my decision making.

I wish I had saved some more money getting my first electric, but of course I didn't really know exactly what I wanted and all the options at the time. Got an Epiphone Les Paul which I ended up selling once I got my Schecter 3 or 4 years later. Would I have sold my LP even if I originally had the money for a Gibson? Maybe, turns out I actually don't like LPs much in the first place.

I recently got a 7 string guitar. Agile Interceptor Pro on sale for $400. A few things went into that. I've only played a 7 string once and couldn't justify going for something "nice" for twice as much or more. It was on sale, so that's always good and it happened to have passive pick ups (don't like actives). They're not great but I knew I was going to be replacing them, and I knew I would be happier with passives than actives in the meantime. As far as pickups, I'm pretty strongly considering some Bareknuckles which will cost around 3/4 of what I paid for the guitar. I really like the guitar, plays nice and everything and I don't think I am likely to upgrade to a "better" 7 string. Just need to put on some thicker gauge strings and do a proper set up, then I'll decide how much I really want to spend over $300 for pick ups.

Amps on the other hand, I got a JSX that I couldn't afford at the time because the Bugera's were blowing up. I also eventually picked up a Jet City 50 watt head because there's no way in the foreseeable future I could afford an SLO.

Just have to do your research on things and figure out what cost/performance ratio you see/perceive and what you can feasibly afford or save for.
I have a huge fear if rays.
#20
I live by:

"You get what you pay for"

And so far I've learned it to be true.
Just another Sheep in the design of the Almighty Machine.


-GEAR-
Gibson 60s Les Paul Tribute (Sunburst)
1999 Ibanez RG470 (TitaniumIce-MIJ)
Jackson RR3 (Trans-Red)
Peavey 6505+
Podx3
#21
Honestly, it's kind of a hard question to answer and aside from the other factors mentioned (money/time/situations) it really depends mostly on your personal view of it.


For me, the most important thing is playability and sound. If the thing stays in tune, everything works as it should and I can get it set up nicely, that's a good to go for me. While a Gibby LP might be nice, if I can find something much cheaper that works just as well, it's hard for me to justify getting the more expensive guitar. I also feel there tends to be a line where you start paying for a fancier guitar (better appointments, fancier parts/inlays, cosmetic stuff) vs a functional one that isn't any worse.


For amps and pedal it's a little different. I don't mind cheaper pedals, but I do mind when they come in flimsy casings or buttons that break easy. I'm also not as versed on working on electronics as much as woodworking/guitar stuff so it's really important for me to have something reliable and something I won't put my foot through.


With that being said, I've owned a lot of cheap stuff that sounded/played great. I've also had cheap stuff that was absolute garbage. I've owned expensive stuff that were absolute dogs and I've owned expensive stuff that I regret selling to this day. You can make it work no matter the price point. What works best depends on the person and the situation.


A couple of things to note though:


1) for the most part, cheaper guitars will need much more time and effort to get them playing and sounding at a level you're comfortable with. Things like fret work, new hardware etc... isn't uncommon when people work with cheap guitars.


2) $$$ doesn't always mean better for you. You might spend 4 figures on a guitar and still feel the need to swap things out.


3) Another factor is situation. I don't play out anymore so I'm mostly playing at home. Durability and ruggedness isn't too important in a place like that so I could probably get away with some cheaper things. If I was still playing out, I'd probably rather something that could take a pounding. I wouldn't want to be really into the moment and then crush my pedal underfoot cause it was made of plastic. Wouldn't want my Bugera to catch fire half way through my set either.


To answer the initial question though, I tend to find a cheaper alternative first before I commit.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#22
Quote by Cajundaddy
They are simply tools so buy the right tool for the job. If a $500 guitar will take you where you want to go a $5000 guitar would be a waste of resources better spent elsewhere. If a $400 amp is built too cheaply and will fail often when you need it, better to spend more on a more durable workhorse.

Buying wisely often has less to do with brand name or price than one might think.


+1

Quote by dannyalcatraz
This. But, in our family, we have what we call "The Lesson of the Bose Speakers."

In the mid-1970's, my Dad was assembling his "dream" hi-fi system, and part of that was getting Bose 901s. However, he was running short of $$$ for the project, and instead of waiting until he could afford them, he bought some (very nice) Marantz speakers.

About 2 years later, he bought a pair of Bose 901s, and the Marantz speakers became end-tables until I commandeered them for my own stereo system. And I still own and use them. Those 901s died a few years ago...but Bose replaced them for the cost of shipping.

The lesson? Sometimes, despite what logic tells you, your heart tells you something else. If the urge is too strong, and you don't follow your heart, your misery won't cease until it is satisfied with "the real thing." And that could mean incurring all kinds of costs because you chose otherwise.

Applying this to the world of guitars, sometimes something that is less expensive or even made by another manufacturer will do the job, and for much less money. But if your heart is fixated on a particular manufacturer's product, no amount of logic and facts will dissuade you- you might as well pay the extra money and get the guitar you WANT rather than a cheaper one that- strictly speaking- still does what you need.

So, I will often recommend substitutes for pricer guitars, like Electra Omegas for Gibson Les Pauls. But if I see that someone is set on buying a Gibson, I won't bother, and instead will try to help them find their best deal on a Gibby.


that too. sometimes you just know in your gut what you want, and you won't be happy till you get it.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Feb 12, 2015,
#23
you may want to reword the ? a little. the reason i say this is because of course i want to spend as little money as i have to( ie Cheap). nothing to do with quality just human nature. if store A has say a Les Paul for $2000 and store B has the same model LP for $1500 which one are you going to buy.

more to the ? though i've found that you need to balance the urge to be "cheap" and the urge to splurge cuz "i want". i'm a firm believer in doing my research when i want to buy something. i've certainly pissed away money on cheap things and regretted it in the long run. bought a coupe of expensive items and found that something that was less expensive was actually better for my needs as well. i try to be realistic in my decisions as well. there is always something "better" out there so sweating that can just make you nuts.

the last thing i've found is to keep an open mind. the whole only a ( fill in product here) will do thing can be counterproductive. sure i totally understand the urge and have them just like anyone else. i can't afford many of mine. so what can give me a similar sound, feel etc is what i will ask myself. if i can't find something that has decent quality and delivers within reason what i want then i'll put that item on hold until either i can afford my first choice or somethig that fits the bill comes along. of course that is hard to do but after wasting money a few times i've learned that patience is a virtue worth having.
#24
Quote by Fallenoath
I live by:

"You get what you pay for"

And so far I've learned it to be true.


I've found that little "nugget o' wisdom" to be false as often as it's true which is unsurprising considering that it implies a strict claim that price=quality while entirely ignoring the myriad other factors that influence price in the marketplace.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#25
Quote by Arby911
I've found that little "nugget o' wisdom" to be false as often as it's true which is unsurprising considering that it implies a strict claim that price=quality while entirely ignoring the myriad other factors that influence price in the marketplace.


agreed
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#26
Quote by Fallenoath
I live by:

"You get what you pay for"

And so far I've learned it to be true.


True enough, but for me "payment" is time, money and effort spent on modding. It might well end up more expensive that buying high in the first place, especially when tools are taken into account, but you get the satisfaction of a truly custom guitar. Each to his own.
#27
Quote by Taz9


I'm not really talking about used VS new here, more like "The real thing, Gibson les paul VS The less real thing, Gibson les paul studio".


Your premise is seriously flawed, here.

I have three "real things" -- 1950's Les Paul Customs. Never play them.
The reason is that the frets are too low and the necks are too fat. They're simply not great guitars for the modern idiom.

Honestly, a Gibson Les Paul R9 is in sort of the same boat, though there are *some* improvements. But you still have a guitar with a clubby neck, rosewood fretboard, plastic inlays, so-so-frets, a locked-in 12" radius fretboard, a headstock that's still one of the most broken in the industry, a plastic nut, cheap tuners, a cheap bridge and tailpiece, a clunky neck heel that makes upper fret access a pain for anyone with largish hands. You're buying expensive, but you're not buying a great guitar.

I'd rather have a guitar with a neck profile that I like, with an ebony fretboard, real MOP inlays, stainless frets (in the size I prefer), a flatter (my preference) radius, a headstock that's less likely to break, a teflon nut, better quality tuners, a better quality bridge and tailpiece and a carved-away neck heel that makes upper fret access fast and comfortable. Screw the "real thing" if you can get a better guitar.

Gibson produces the Studio as a cheaper Les Paul, eliminating things like binding simply to drop the price.

But if I can get that "better guitar" mentioned above with all the multi-layer binding and fancy top and better quality construction (how about neck-through construction?) for less money, I'm seriously ahead of the game, no?

Far too many people walking into a Guitar Denter and looking to whatever brand is highest on the wall and assuming that it's the best because it's got the highest price tag. Sorry, but I encourage people to think twice (and maybe three times) before making that mistake.
#28
Quote by Dave_Mc

that too. sometimes you just know in your gut what you want, and you won't be happy till you get it.


Or as an ex-wife used to put it, "Reason and accountability be damned. I want what I want when I want it!" (usually followed by a stamp of her dainty foot).

Guitar players and irrational women. Arguing with either is fruitloops.
#29
^ LOL

Quote by Arby911
I've found that little "nugget o' wisdom" to be false as often as it's true which is unsurprising considering that it implies a strict claim that price=quality while entirely ignoring the myriad other factors that influence price in the marketplace.


+1

There are a lot of chancers claiming their cheapo product is "just as good" as the more expensive item when it patently isn't- but there's (probably) a similar number of chancers claiming their more expensive product is better when it equally patently isn't.

Plus as you said a lot of other factors go into the price of the thing.

As I always say, are the Mesas sold in Europe twice as good as the ones sold in the USA?
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Feb 12, 2015,
#30
Quote by dspellman
Your premise is seriously flawed, here.

I have three "real things" -- 1950's Les Paul Customs. Never play them.
The reason is that the frets are too low and the necks are too fat. They're simply not great guitars for the modern idiom.

Honestly, a Gibson Les Paul R9 is in sort of the same boat, though there are *some* improvements. But you still have a guitar with a clubby neck, rosewood fretboard, plastic inlays, so-so-frets, a locked-in 12" radius fretboard, a headstock that's still one of the most broken in the industry, a plastic nut, cheap tuners, a cheap bridge and tailpiece, a clunky neck heel that makes upper fret access a pain for anyone with largish hands. You're buying expensive, but you're not buying a great guitar.

I'd rather have a guitar with a neck profile that I like, with an ebony fretboard, real MOP inlays, stainless frets (in the size I prefer), a flatter (my preference) radius, a headstock that's less likely to break, a teflon nut, better quality tuners, a better quality bridge and tailpiece and a carved-away neck heel that makes upper fret access fast and comfortable. Screw the "real thing" if you can get a better guitar.

Gibson produces the Studio as a cheaper Les Paul, eliminating things like binding simply to drop the price.

But if I can get that "better guitar" mentioned above with all the multi-layer binding and fancy top and better quality construction (how about neck-through construction?) for less money, I'm seriously ahead of the game, no?

Far too many people walking into a Guitar Denter and looking to whatever brand is highest on the wall and assuming that it's the best because it's got the highest price tag. Sorry, but I encourage people to think twice (and maybe three times) before making that mistake.


agree for sure. i heard a quote years ago that applies to this (and oddly enough woman) can't remeber who originally said it but it has stuck with me for many years. "what you think you want and what you really need are rarely the same" . this is why i try to keep an open mind when it comes to gear. i've mentioned before that i use a BC Rich Eagle to cover what i guess you could call my Les Paul needs. owned a couple of LP's over the years and never bonded with them. i just can't really play them comfortably. came across the Eagle and gave it a try cuz i'd never played one before (or seen one outside of neil geraldo using one at a pat benatar concert i was at). worked way better for me. i'd have never thought to buy one just sitting around say "what should i buy".
#31
^ Yeah I was going to add (but was too lazy as usual ) to what I said above about "sometimes you just know in your gut what you want, and you won't be happy till you get it"- just because you won't be happy until you get it is no guarantee you'll be happy when you do get it.

But at least that way you know for sure.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#32
Quote by dspellman
Or as an ex-wife used to put it, "Reason and accountability be damned. I want what I want when I want it!" (usually followed by a stamp of her dainty foot).

Guitar players and irrational women. Arguing with either is fruitloops.




Yes maybe "want what you want" within reason makes sense. A 15 yr old kid living in his mom's house with no financial means has no business getting a $4k Gibson LP Custom.

When I was 15 I really really wanted a Gibson SG because all my hero's were playing them at the time. Pete Townsend, Jimi, Clapton, Santana, Iommi. No way I could get a new one on paper route money and asking my parents to buy me one was just too weak for words. I did find a nice used one and after playing it every day for two weeks in the store the owner said if I wanted to take it home I could pay $50/mo for 4 months. Sold! I still have it 40 years later.

These days I am car shopping and I really really want a Porsche 918 Spyder. Sadly I don't have a spare $900k lying around and I wouldn't spend that much scratch on a weekend joyride anyhow so I will probably find something used and a lot more realistic but still a ton of fun.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#33
Your premise is seriously flawed, here.


It's not flawed. You answered exactly to what I was asking...
#34
Quote by Cajundaddy


Yes maybe "want what you want" within reason makes sense. A 15 yr old kid living in his mom's house with no financial means has no business getting a $4k Gibson LP Custom.

When I was 15 I really really wanted a Gibson SG because all my hero's were playing them at the time. Pete Townsend, Jimi, Clapton, Santana, Iommi. No way I could get a new one on paper route money and asking my parents to buy me one was just too weak for words. I did find a nice used one and after playing it every day for two weeks in the store the owner said if I wanted to take it home I could pay $50/mo for 4 months. Sold! I still have it 40 years later.

These days I am car shopping and I really really want a Porsche 918 Spyder. Sadly I don't have a spare $900k lying around and I wouldn't spend that much scratch on a weekend joyride anyhow so I will probably find something used and a lot more realistic but still a ton of fun.


geez what is the world coming to when a guy doesn't have a spare 900K just laying around.
#35
My main gigging guitar these days is a total forgery loaded with hardware that cost substantially more than the whole rest of the guitar. Hell, the bridge cost as much all by itself (Hipshot Trilogy).
It plays quite well for what I use it for (slide) and gets lots of compliments from people. I spent the money where it was needed. I couldn't see the need to do otherwise so I didn't. It needed a good bridge, tuners and pup so that's where the money went.
When I was shredding, I had a guitar built for me because that was appropriate. Money should go where it's needed, not to satisfy some purile pursuit of vanity. Impress people with your playing and your tone, not how much money you can waste. **** vanity.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#36
Quote by Cathbard
My main gigging guitar these days is a total forgery loaded with hardware that cost substantially more than the whole rest of the guitar. Hell, the bridge cost as much all by itself (Hipshot Trilogy).
It plays quite well for what I use it for (slide) and gets lots of compliments from people. I spent the money where it was needed. I couldn't see the need to do otherwise so I didn't. It needed a good bridge, tuners and pup so that's where the money went.
When I was shredding, I had a guitar built for me because that was appropriate. Money should go where it's needed, not to satisfy some purile pursuit of vanity. Impress people with your playing and your tone, not how much money you can waste. **** vanity.


wait !!!! what????? impress people with your playing..... that's just crazy talk.

totally agree. none of my gear will impress anyone but i always hope that my playing will at least say i'm not a talentless bozo.
#37
My main tele is obviously not real if you look closely at it but nobody has ever picked it at a gig. It just looks like a modified Fender until you examine it closely. I've had people with real teles tell me how much they like mine. I just chuckle. Mine sounds better mainly because it has a good pup talking to a good amp. Fender stickers are cheap.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#38
I must add to this that people can be easily biased by what they see.

We are visually appealed by objects, and if you ask somebody which car is the best between two, they'll tend to pick the one they are the most appealed by. Which means that a cheap-looking guitar could "sound better" (ie good pickups), and still be considered a less good sounding guitar than the nice looking one. (Source: Some work/studies I recall reading at university )

Guitar companies are more than surely aware of it all. Marketing is a strong machine, that might want to sell you a good looking guitar for a good amount of money, while there are cheap better/equal choices. Like some people pointed out.

Altought that being said, from a public relations point of view, I strongly believe that you will look more professionnal if you do own guitars people are used to see on TV, which are often more expensive guitars because they look nice.

Conclusion, if you look nice, crowd hear nice. While not being 100% true, I think it weights enough to be taken into account. Why do you guys think Brittany Spears made it?

Nota Bene: I do not own any Gibson.
Last edited by Taz9 at Feb 13, 2015,
#39
Quote by Cathbard
My main tele is obviously not real if you look closely at it but nobody has ever picked it at a gig. It just looks like a modified Fender until you examine it closely. I've had people with real teles tell me how much they like mine. I just chuckle. Mine sounds better mainly because it has a good pup talking to a good amp. Fender stickers are cheap.


Although the acoustics I played at gigs were chosen for street cred -Gibson, Maton, National and Beltona - I've gone the anti-snob route with electrics. - "I'm good, I don't need a *******". I agree entirely about good pickups and good amps, the wood is just that, a fancy lump of wood.
#40
i buy nice, but more importantly buy smart. nice =/= expensive. i paid $40 for a 1982 Peavey US Horizon II, and it plays just as nice as an american telecaster or strat, and is just as solid too . i am not one to say that much.

it felt nice in my hands, it sounded good. extremely versatile. incomparable to anything else anybody would ever find for that price.

_______

i think out of the guitars that i play are between $1000-$2000. (ibanez prestiges, higher priced american teles, Gibsons, etc).

also i have a pair of Wolfgangs that are insanely nice (one trem one hardtail, both USA), that i paid $400 and $450 for respectively. they hang right in there.

_______
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



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