#1
Hi all,

I can play some hard things on guitar with no problem, and I also know some music theory, but when it comes to transcribing songs by ear I feel like it's something impossible.

Also tuning guitar by ear it feels like an easy job, but transcribing fast solos or complicated riffs seems impossible to me.

So I need some advice on what is the best approach to write any song I hear in guitar pro, with all the instruments.

What should it be the best thing to do? Should I try a guitar ear trainer software, and if so, which one?
#2
You need to start with more simple stuff. Your ear needs to develop. When you started playing the guitar, you didn't start with the most complex riffs and solos. You started with simple stuff. Same applies to everything. Start with simple stuff like AC/DC or whatever. If that's too simple, try something a bit more complex.

When I used to tab songs, I usually slowed down the fastest and most complex sections.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#3
Quote by kull2009
Hi all,

I can play some hard things on guitar with no problem, and I also know some music theory, but when it comes to transcribing songs by ear I feel like it's something impossible.

Also tuning guitar by ear it feels like an easy job, but transcribing fast solos or complicated riffs seems impossible to me.

So I need some advice on what is the best approach to write any song I hear in guitar pro, with all the instruments.

What should it be the best thing to do? Should I try a guitar ear trainer software, and if so, which one?


Transcribing fast stuff is hard. You've got to work up to it.

Start with melodies. A great place to begin is simple stuff you know by heart: nursery rhymes, christmas carols, movie themes. If you can't do that stuff quickly and easily by ear, you're not going to be to do complicated solos. So work on that. There will be some trial and error, hunting and pecking, and that's fine.

The best software I found for helping with your ear is free. The functional ear trainer, a free download from miles.be, was the difference-maker to me.
#4
Old Blues - Albert King, BB King and simple Rock like ACDC or old Sabbath are a great place to start. Avoid anything with a lot of speed at the start.
#6
I don't know. I haven't used it. It looks like at least partially functional in its approach, so I suspect it'd be useful and good.

The functional ear trainer has the advantage of being free, and it's possible that playing the answers with your guitar is less important than you think.

But it's not that expensive, so if you want to give it a try, why not?
#7
Ear trainer are a useful tool , but they don't replace actually learning songs by ear with trial and error.
#9
Quote by Elintasokas
In my opinion transcribing and sight singing > "functional" ear trainers


It's not one or the other.

You should be doing all of this stuff.

For me, the functional ear trainer was a tool that made a huge difference. Other people's mileage may vary. People kept telling me to transcribe songs but even simple melodies were very difficult for me, to the point where it got frustrating and I stopped wanting to work at it.

It's free, and easy to do for 5-10 minutes at a time, so there's really not much downside.

The key thing is that this is something you can work at, and there are a variety of tools and approaches you can use ... so why not use all of them?
#11
Usually when I'm transcribing songs by ear, I start with the bass notes,
write the chords out to make a simple chord chart.

Then I'll go with the guitar part, rhythms and solos.
#14
Quote by HotspurJr
It's not one or the other.

You should be doing all of this stuff.

For me, the functional ear trainer was a tool that made a huge difference. Other people's mileage may vary. People kept telling me to transcribe songs but even simple melodies were very difficult for me, to the point where it got frustrating and I stopped wanting to work at it.

It's free, and easy to do for 5-10 minutes at a time, so there's really not much downside.

The key thing is that this is something you can work at, and there are a variety of tools and approaches you can use ... so why not use all of them?


Still, if I'd have to choose one over another, I'd pick transcribing. And it's not strictly because it's better ear training, but because learning songs by ear is pretty much the most important exercise you could do. If I only ever had 5 minutes a day to play guitar, I'd use that to transcribe by ear.

Otherwise I agree, if you have time, you should at least try out all the different resources. But if you have limited time, I'd say that transcribing is more important.
#15
The problem with ear trainers is that they only give you isolated intervals. Melodies are more than just isolated intervals picked from a scale. Sure it's also useful, but to get the full use of it, you should also definitely sing the intervals.
#16
I can also play some stuff using my ear,,, it is hard for a new musicians,,, my word for that is "to be addict of what you are doing" so keep doing it day and night..,,,
1) play the melodies, riffs or etc that you want to play in your mind first, if you can memories it in your mind, its the time to play it on your guitar or any music instruments,, then leave your hands to play,, because the melodies or riffs that you memories, will guide your fingers...
hope it can help...
#17
I started transcribing a Vinnie Moore song a few songs in. I'm only halfway through but it was very painful because it involved a lot of trial and error and slowing down of things.

Yeah, start with something easier.