#1
I'm about to paint a guitar that I've sanded the old paint off of. I started off with 80 grit and eventually moved to 150. Basically I'm wondering if I should go over the whole body a little more with the 80 to give the body a rougher texture, or should I leave it in its fairly smooth state.
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ
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#3
Ok well this was a cheaply made, free guitar body. My first time painting one so I'm on with messing up and learnin things. So stupid mistake aside, you thnk I should go over it with a realy fine paper now?
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ
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#4
Yes go to at least 400 grit, I would go to 600 if it were me. Always sand with the grain of the wood, never across it. Get some tack cloth to help clean up the dust.

You can also use a rectangular piece of glass, about the size of a playing card. Lean it away from you and push, it will scrape fine shavings off the wood and leave a finish close to 400 grit sandpaper. I did a set of oak stairs I built for my mother's house that way, never touched the oak with sandpaper and it looked great. You can lean it toward you and pull, or lean away from you and push. Practice on a scrap piece of wood for a few minutes first. It works great. Doesn't take a lot of pressure. We used a glass cutter to cut sections out of a broken window pane.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#5
Quote by ibanezguitars44
Ok well this was a cheaply made, free guitar body. My first time painting one so I'm on with messing up and learnin things. So stupid mistake aside, you thnk I should go over it with a realy fine paper now?


Go over with 400 grit until you can longer see the scratches from the 80 & 150 grit papers
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#6
Quote by Paleo Pete
Yes go to at least 400 grit, I would go to 600 if it were me. Always sand with the grain of the wood, never across it. Get some tack cloth to help clean up the dust.

You can also use a rectangular piece of glass, about the size of a playing card. Lean it away from you and push, it will scrape fine shavings off the wood and leave a finish close to 400 grit sandpaper. I did a set of oak stairs I built for my mother's house that way, never touched the oak with sandpaper and it looked great. You can lean it toward you and pull, or lean away from you and push. Practice on a scrap piece of wood for a few minutes first. It works great. Doesn't take a lot of pressure. We used a glass cutter to cut sections out of a broken window pane.


This is a version of what is called a cabinet scraper. It is most usually a piece of flat steel (often cut from an old hand saw) The edge is finished flat and then rolled to create a cutting bur. It is great for flat surfaces but not really suitable for a guitar body.

90% of a good paint finish is preparation And note that, for some reason, spray finishes seem to amplify any marks beneath. Any visible scratch prior to painting will show as a more defined scratch when the paint cures. On the plus side, it can be easier to remove such scratches by sanding the new paint (prior to another coat) than trying to cut it out of the original surface completely.