#1
I've recently been looking at getting a new Peavey 6505 and I decided I want to learn a good song the whole way through for when I get it. I've decided on learning Raining Blood but I'm unsure of how difficult it is.

I've been playing for like 8-9 months or so and probably been slacking for that time since guitar only recently became anything but frustrating. I've never learned a song the whole way through though, I mean I've played most parts of some Metallica songs and stuff but never the whole thing.

So basically my question is, could someone of my skill level play this? I'm pretty sure I can play the gallop thing well enough due to a frustrating two weeks of learning Battery, but some of the other parts just seem ridiculous!
Thanks.
TL;DR Can I play Raining Blood after somewhat lazily playing for 9 months?
#2
I've heard the alternate picking riff at the start is very difficult, and you've not been playing long so that would likely cause you a lot of problems.. As for the rest of the song, I don't see why not with some practice. It's a very straight forward song with only 2 or 3 different licks. it shouldn't take too long to learn.
I wouldn't bother at all with the solo though because it's just Kerry King jacking off his whammy bar for 20 seconds with very non definitive notes. Nothing can be achieved from attempting to learn and play it.

Also.. I would advise against any of the Peavey 6505 series. You will DEFINITELY outgrow it sooner or later. It's notorious for it's very limited capabilities of exclusively br00tal m3t4lz. That being said, I'm sure you'll love it now if you're in to that kind of music, I'm just warning that you will end up getting sick of it somewhere down the line. Every guitarist does.
Just my very bias 2 cents on that amp..
Last edited by vayne92 at Feb 13, 2015,
#3
Quote by vayne92
I've heard the alternate picking riff at the start is very difficult, and you've not been playing long so that would likely cause you a lot of problems.. As for the rest of the song, I don't see why not with some practice. It's a very straight forward song with only 2 or 3 different licks. it shouldn't take too long to learn.
I wouldn't bother at all with the solo though because it's just Kerry King jacking off his whammy for 20 seconds with very non definitive notes. Nothing can be achieved from attempting to learn and play it.

Yeah, definitely not bothering with the solo. At best it would be a lesson in learning stuff that has absolutely no rhythm. Do you have any tips for learning songs, this one in particular, all the way through? I tend to get bored/distracted/discouraged and move on to something else.
#4
Quote by Cheeseshark
Do you have any tips for learning songs, this one in particular, all the way through? I tend to get bored/distracted/discouraged and move on to something else.


Depending on the intricacy of the song I would recommend only learning around 30-60 seconds of the song a day. When you're a better player those 30-60seconds a day wont apply in the same manner.
For Raining Blood I'd try to go for 60 seconds each day. The most important thing when learning a song is of course to remember how to play it first. Spend the first couple of days just remembering how to play every part.
Once you remember how to play it then it's time you focus on playing it good. Play the whole song through a few times then set aside more time for areas that you have more difficulty. The alternate picking part at the start for instance.. That will for sure be the hardest part for you to learn, so you'll end up spending the most time on that obviously.

I could go a lot more in depth about learning songs, because as you improve you'll start to discover that recognizing and practising the phrasing in songs is a very VERY important element, and you usually spend the most time developing your phrasing more than anything else.. for now though, I think phrasing isn't as important as it will be in a few years, because phrasing is the sort of thing you discover for yourself and that others can't teach you in the way that only you can. I just think it's the sort of thing that players have to discover for themselves.

As for getting discouraged etc, I can definitely relate to this. Every guitarist gets discouraged at some point.
Oddly enough when I first started I would never get bored of learning songs for some reason. Nearly 6 years later it's very much the opposite.

It's rare these days that I learn a song in its entirety. The only time I really do so now is not if I like a song, but if that song is INSPIRING. hundreds of songs I enjoy listening to, but very very few of them can truly inspire me. That's something special, and it's when I find that rare song that inspires me that I have the drive to learn the entire thing. There's a different feeling when you play something inspiring because it's a joy to play and it can be very uplifting when you eventually hear yourself play it, or play along with it on Youtube or whatever. It gives you a serious sense of accomplishment and pride.

A good video I recommend every guitarist watch is this one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atGBKuCJ-Jc

Such an excellent video, very inspiring.

I could really talk about being discouraged on guitar a lot, but it's almost like a learning experience when you get in those ruts that we all do. In the long run I feel being discouraged can be a good thing. It's human

PS: Raining Blood is not inspiring (I worry for anyone who thinks it is)
Last edited by vayne92 at Feb 13, 2015,
#5
Quote by vayne92

Also.. I would advise against any of the Peavey 6505 series. You will DEFINITELY outgrow it sooner or later. It's notorious for it's very limited capabilities of exclusively br00tal m3t4lz. That being said, I'm sure you'll love it now if you're in to that kind of music, I'm just warning that you will end up getting sick of it somewhere down the line. Every guitarist does.
Just my very bias 2 cents on that amp..


I definitely don't agree with this. Have you spent any real time with a 6505? Have you done any mods such as tubes, etc.?

For the tone in my head, I haven't found any amps that are much more suitable. The other amps I've tried that also sounded good were 3 X the price of a 6505. If you play metal, it is the best bang for your buck. Also, you can get decent mid-gain tones out of it if you select the right tubes and use the rhythm channel. Finally, the cleans can be made to be more than acceptable, again, with some tube upgrades and knowing your EQ.

Finally, who are you to judge what is 'inspiring' to other people? The first time I heard "Raining Blood," I was blown away by the ferocity of the riffs -- that whole album, actually. Maybe you're a jazz player/listener. Maybe you listen to Taylor Swift or Nickelback. I don't really care. But don't judge other people for what they like in music.

TS, "Raining Blood" is a very worthy song. The hardest part is probably the galloping part. But it is a gateway song in that if you learn to play that part, you'll have that technique in your bag of tricks permanently. Admittedly, I've never taken the time to learn the solo -- but I play everything else in the song. I don't really like Slayer for King's solos, I like it for their song structures and rhythm riffs. You may want to try "Seasons in the Abyss" for an easier introduction to Slayer.
#6
Quote by vayne92
Also.. I would advise against any of the Peavey 6505 series. You will DEFINITELY outgrow it sooner or later. It's notorious for it's very limited capabilities of exclusively br00tal m3t4lz.

Definitely agree with KailM on this point, having used a 6505+ with my band for well over a year I would say that there's actually not much that the amp can't do if you know what you're doing. If it was possible for me to still have the head then I would because I really liked using it while I had access to the thing.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#7
Quote by Cheeseshark

TL;DR Can I play Raining Blood after somewhat lazily playing for 9 months?

No. Not at that speed.

edit: I play Slayer a lot, and imo Raining Blood is the hardest of all
Last edited by Knarrenheino at Feb 13, 2015,
#8
LONG LIVE THE 6505!
But really, I love mine!

If I ever get tired of it, I get tired of it...big deal.
Just another Sheep in the design of the Almighty Machine.


-GEAR-
Gibson 60s Les Paul Tribute (Sunburst)
1999 Ibanez RG470 (TitaniumIce-MIJ)
Jackson RR3 (Trans-Red)
Peavey 6505+
Podx3
#9
Well hey, as I said that's just my very bias 2 cents. It's not for everyone (obviously not me). From my experience everyone I've known personally to own one has sold it down the line. Some people here seem to feel pretty strongly about it being a staple amp so to hell with my opinions on it, or anyone else's frankly. If you like it then you like it.
There are some large touring bands who I know of that use the amp - Parkway Drive, Devil Wears Prada, August Burns Red. I'm sure there's plenty more. Regardless of all opinions, I think anyone could objectively agree that it's an amp best for metal. Outside of the genre there are other alternatives.
#10
Yeah the alternate picking riff is absolutely ridiculous. Anyone got any tips for learning that after I master the other riffs?
#11
Quote by Knarrenheino
No. Not at that speed.

edit: I play Slayer a lot, and imo Raining Blood is the hardest of all

Oh god. The whole thing or mostly the alternate picking at light speed riff?
#12
Quote by Cheeseshark
Yeah the alternate picking riff is absolutely ridiculous. Anyone got any tips for learning that after I master the other riffs?


Just to be sure, you're talking about the reverse galloping part right? The part at 0:44 of this video? Raining Blood

If so, that's a reverse gallop. If you've ever heard the song "Barracuda" by Heart, that's a forward gallop. I recommend learning it. Once you learn how to forward gallop, you'll quickly learn the reverse gallop -- it's the same technique only different beats are accentuated. Galloping is used on a hell of a lot of thrash albums and death metal albums. Once you learn the technique and get a feel for it, you can apply it to pretty much any song that has any variation of it. I won't say it's easy, but once you learn it you'll be able to play that Slayer riff with ease. It's really a feel thing; and once you get it down, your brain can just go on autopilot and play gallops without having to think about it (actually most of guitar playing is like that, lol). After many years of playing this technique, for example, I can play Raining Blood in almost double-time if I really want to.

The key is in making very small motions with your pick, and also your palm-muting technique. But yeah, practice by playing "Barracuda," and practice slowly for accuracy. Then slowly increase your speed until it sounds accurate and clean. Then move on to "Raining Blood."
Last edited by KailM at Feb 14, 2015,
#13
Pretty sure theyre talking about 1:06 as that's significantly harder than the gallops. And no I don't think you're ready for this song but if you get a crappy version going and you enjoy it then it really doesn't matter if it sounds amazing. Then you can go back to it in a few months, you'll be surprised you might still not have it but it'll be better.
#14
Quote by KailM
Just to be sure, you're talking about the reverse galloping part right? The part at 0:44 of this video? Raining Blood

If so, that's a reverse gallop. If you've ever heard the song "Barracuda" by Heart, that's a forward gallop. I recommend learning it. Once you learn how to forward gallop, you'll quickly learn the reverse gallop -- it's the same technique only different beats are accentuated. Galloping is used on a hell of a lot of thrash albums and death metal albums. Once you learn the technique and get a feel for it, you can apply it to pretty much any song that has any variation of it. I won't say it's easy, but once you learn it you'll be able to play that Slayer riff with ease. It's really a feel thing; and once you get it down, your brain can just go on autopilot and play gallops without having to think about it (actually most of guitar playing is like that, lol). After many years of playing this technique, for example, I can play Raining Blood in almost double-time if I really want to.

The key is in making very small motions with your pick, and also your palm-muting technique. But yeah, practice by playing "Barracuda," and practice slowly for accuracy. Then slowly increase your speed until it sounds accurate and clean. Then move on to "Raining Blood."

I was actually talking about the part at 1:06 that Bloodandempire mentioned. Though I didn't realize that was a reverse gallop. Thinking it might be a good idea to give up on this song till' I can play that part correctly. When can you tell that you're ready for parts like this? My picking hand can move at the right speed and so can my left hand, but I think it just seems ridiculous.
Last edited by Cheeseshark at Feb 14, 2015,
#15
Also I m would appreciate suggestions for other Slayer songs that are a tad easier. I know someone mentioned Seasons In the Abyss already.
#16
Quote by vayne92
Depending on the intricacy of the song I would recommend only learning around 30-60 seconds of the song a day. When you're a better player those 30-60seconds a day wont apply in the same manner.
For Raining Blood I'd try to go for 60 seconds each day. The most important thing when learning a song is of course to remember how to play it first. Spend the first couple of days just remembering how to play every part.
Once you remember how to play it then it's time you focus on playing it good. Play the whole song through a few times then set aside more time for areas that you have more difficulty. The alternate picking part at the start for instance.. That will for sure be the hardest part for you to learn, so you'll end up spending the most time on that obviously.

I could go a lot more in depth about learning songs, because as you improve you'll start to discover that recognizing and practising the phrasing in songs is a very VERY important element, and you usually spend the most time developing your phrasing more than anything else.. for now though, I think phrasing isn't as important as it will be in a few years, because phrasing is the sort of thing you discover for yourself and that others can't teach you in the way that only you can. I just think it's the sort of thing that players have to discover for themselves.

As for getting discouraged etc, I can definitely relate to this. Every guitarist gets discouraged at some point.
Oddly enough when I first started I would never get bored of learning songs for some reason. Nearly 6 years later it's very much the opposite.

It's rare these days that I learn a song in its entirety. The only time I really do so now is not if I like a song, but if that song is INSPIRING. hundreds of songs I enjoy listening to, but very very few of them can truly inspire me. That's something special, and it's when I find that rare song that inspires me that I have the drive to learn the entire thing. There's a different feeling when you play something inspiring because it's a joy to play and it can be very uplifting when you eventually hear yourself play it, or play along with it on Youtube or whatever. It gives you a serious sense of accomplishment and pride.

A good video I recommend every guitarist watch is this one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atGBKuCJ-Jc

Such an excellent video, very inspiring.

I could really talk about being discouraged on guitar a lot, but it's almost like a learning experience when you get in those ruts that we all do. In the long run I feel being discouraged can be a good thing. It's human

PS: Raining Blood is not inspiring (I worry for anyone who thinks it is)

I just now noticed that you attached a video. As you said, very inspiring. I think I'll take some of his advice next time I sit down to practice. Thanks for sharing that.
#17
Sorry to post several times in a row but what do you guys think of me trying to play War Ensemble? That opening riff is pretty fast but not actually too difficult. Do you guys recommend working my speed up even when playing fast but simple stuff like that? Or is simple enough that I can just kinda play it without too much practice? Thanks.
EDIT: Never mind everything past that is just complicated enough to make it too difficult for me. Probably gonna need to go with Seasons in the Abyss then.
Last edited by Cheeseshark at Feb 15, 2015,
#19
Quote by bloodandempire
Not to sound silly here but umm why don't you just try these songs and find out if you can play them...nobody here has any say on what you can or can't play or has ever seen you play.

True but I can get recommendations for someone of my general skill level. You are right though, I should probably just try them all. It'll just take a bit of time to sort through them. Thanks for your guys help!
Last edited by Cheeseshark at Feb 15, 2015,
#21
Bloodline, World painted blood and Disciple. That covers a fair bit of Slayer stuff from slow to fast. Once you can knock them out then try some of the really fast ones.