#1
Hi guys,

Just about to buy an Epiphone SG. A few things I'm stuck on.

- It is most likely a g310 as the owner bought it brand new for around $400 a few years ago.
- It has a crowned headstock, when g310's don't usually have that but the g400's do
- Covered humbuckers (g310's don't have that either)
- Dot Inlays (g310's DO have that, but g400's don't)
- Knobs are similar to the g400's
- The red colour is similar to the g310's. The g400's don't come in this red colour

He states it was bought from Allen's music, a highly reputable store and has barely played it. I am inclined to believe him. So that makes customization for this guitar unlikely.

WHAT THE HELL IS THIS THING?? These are the only pictures I have of it. Hoping it's not fake







Thanks!
Last edited by HoboChad at Feb 14, 2015,
#4
Difficult to tell from the angle the pictures have been taken at, but the neck joint doesn't look like it's a bolt-on, which would rule out the 310.

Have you asked the seller what model it is?
#5
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Difficult to tell from the angle the pictures have been taken at, but the neck joint doesn't look like it's a bolt-on, which would rule out the 310.


It does look like a bolt-on to me, because of the little "bump" at the back side of the joint, but it really is difficult to tell
#6
Quote by Knarrenheino
It does look like a bolt-on to me, because of the little "bump" at the back side of the joint, but it really is difficult to tell

Yea, but looking at the Epi website, the set necks on their G-400 Pro series(here), their neck joints aren't exactly totally smooth. i mean, if that join is visible in the pic they put on the website, what the hell is it going to be like on a 'Friday afternoon' job?
#7
I know that so-called joint, my Gibson SG has the same. The gap is narrow though, the bump on the OP's pic seems to be much more pronounced, similar to this:

#8
I just noticed another thing while comparing the neck joints of G310 and G400: The 400 is apparently longer because the neck joint is at the 22nd fret, compared to the 310 where it's in the area of 18th or 19th fret, so the 310's neck is "deeper down" in the guitar body--just like the OP's model.
#9
It would definitely be a bolt on beck, because the neck sits further into the body compared to a set in.

I'm pretty sure it's a g310, but I'm just wondering why there are so many variations to a standard g310
#10
Me too, the only one thing that confuses me is the covered pickups, I thought all G310s had uncovered ones
#11
Quote by HoboChad
It would definitely be a bolt on beck, because the neck sits further into the body compared to a set in.

I'm pretty sure it's a g310, but I'm just wondering why there are so many variations to a standard g310


specs change from time to time. my guess is that it's just an older model.
#13
Quote by Knarrenheino
Me too, the only one thing that confuses me is the covered pickups, I thought all G310s had uncovered ones


It's that and the crown on the headstock.

While it's easy to put covers on the coils I don't think the owner has touched it from buying new.
#14
That's true of course. Epiphone Wiki says the G310 had pickup covers until 1996, but I'll just assume the OP model isn't that old. There's a comprehensive list of Epi SG's in that Wiki, and from all those the OP can only be a G-310 imo.

http://epiphonewiki.com/index.php/SG#G-310

edit: @slapsymcdougal
Last edited by Knarrenheino at Feb 14, 2015,
#15
Thanks guys.

I'll let you know what it really is when I go to inspect it.

Cheers!
#16
Quote by HoboChad
It's that and the crown on the headstock.


Right, that seems to be another anomaly. Odd. But I think, of all models G-310 is still the likeliest.
#18
It maybe a model of the 310 only made for a certain retail store, company's do this all the time
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#19
Quote by HoboChad
Any thoughts on it being a fake?


I'm no expert on that, but why make a fake Epiphone if you can make a fake Gibson with no more effort?

edit: doing the extra effort of adding a crown inlay, only to raise the risk of blowing the cover, also doesn't make sense to me.
Last edited by Knarrenheino at Feb 14, 2015,
#20
Quote by Knarrenheino
I'm no expert on that, but why make a fake Epiphone if you can make a fake Gibson with no more effort?

They are faking all kinds of guitars at any price point these days

I doubt someone faked a G310, but I have seen fake G400's and other $300ish new guitars. Not as common as higher end guitars, but they are out there.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#21
Yes I guess everything will be faked... still seems stupid to me. If it's a fake, it looks like a really professional one, and I'd certainly make a Gibson headstock instead.
Last edited by Knarrenheino at Feb 14, 2015,
#22
Interesting looking SG. I like the tone of the red color. I could own a guitar like that, if it was a set neck.

The determining factor here I think is going to be if it is a set neck or bolt on.

If it is a set neck it is going to be a much nicer guitar, to me. A set neck, along with the other nice features not found on the three ten, could make this a very nice Epi SG, worth having.

It will be very interesting to find out if it is a set neck and even a nicer guitar than the pictures indicate.

Keep us posted.
"Now all the things that use to mean so much to me have got me old before my time." G. Allman, "Old Before My Time", Hittin' The Note cd.
#23
Quote by Knarrenheino
I'm no expert on that, but why make a fake Epiphone if you can make a fake Gibson with no more effort?

Quote by Knarrenheino
Yes I guess everything will be faked... still seems stupid to me. If it's a fake, it looks like a really professional one, and I'd certainly make a Gibson headstock instead.

This kind of logic is why fake Epiphones are made in the first place. People be all like 'Why fake an Epiphone?' and therefore its assumed that all Epiphones are real.

Its far easier to get away with making something fake if people think its illogical to fake it.

Not to mention that Epiphones are sold at far lower prices than Gibsons. When at the same time, fake guitars are typically sold for about $150-$350. That's a far more believable retail price for an Epiphone than it is a Gibson. Because of that, consumers are again, more likely to assume its real.

Faking an Epiphone in some ways makes more sense than faking a Gibson.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Feb 14, 2015,
#24
Quote by DuffB
Interesting looking SG. I like the tone of the red color. I could own a guitar like that, if it was a set neck.

The determining factor here I think is going to be if it is a set neck or bolt on.

If it is a set neck it is going to be a much nicer guitar, to me. A set neck, along with the other nice features not found on the three ten, could make this a very nice Epi SG, worth having.

It will be very interesting to find out if it is a set neck and even a nicer guitar than the pictures indicate.

Keep us posted.


It is a bolt-on, you can tell by how far the neck is set into the body
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
Last edited by Robbgnarly at Feb 14, 2015,
#25
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
This kind of logic is why fake Epiphones are made in the first place. People be all like 'Why fake an Epiphone?' and therefore its assumed that all Epiphones are real.

Its far easier to get away with making something fake if people think its illogical to fake it.

Not to mention that Epiphones are sold at far lower prices than Gibsons. When at the same time, fake guitars are typically sold for about $150-$350. That's a far more believable retail price for an Epiphone than it is a Gibson. Because of that, consumers are again, more likely to assume its real.

Faking an Epiphone in some ways makes more sense than faking a Gibson.


agree in principle but i'm thinking the reality of it may be a bit different. if buying direct from china (or other places along those lines) then it is possible as i have seen a couple of fakes online. there was a site that had a breakdown of how to tell. thing was that it was a Les Paul in both cases and higher end ones. is it really worth faking a $150 guitar, probably not.
#26
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
This kind of logic is why fake Epiphones are made in the first place. People be all like 'Why fake an Epiphone?' and therefore its assumed that all Epiphones are real.

Its far easier to get away with making something fake if people think its illogical to fake it.

Not to mention that Epiphones are sold at far lower prices than Gibsons. When at the same time, fake guitars are typically sold for about $150-$350. That's a far more believable retail price for an Epiphone than it is a Gibson. Because of that, consumers are again, more likely to assume its real.

Faking an Epiphone in some ways makes more sense than faking a Gibson.


I was thinking about that too, "less probable that it's fake" etc. But if fake guitars are sold for 150-350, why not make a Gibson headstock and sell it for more? Of course, you'd assume that the average Epiphone buyer is no guitar expert who will quickly tell it's fake, but then again, not all (cough) Gibson buyers are experts either, so why not fool them instead for more profit?

Not saying they wouldn't, just that I still don't fully understand the logic behind faking Epiphones.

But then again, never assume what people do is logical.
#27
Quote by monwobobbo
agree in principle but i'm thinking the reality of it may be a bit different. if buying direct from china (or other places along those lines) then it is possible as i have seen a couple of fakes online. there was a site that had a breakdown of how to tell. thing was that it was a Les Paul in both cases and higher end ones. is it really worth faking a $150 guitar, probably not.

There are a couple of problems with this hypothesis. There are websites (My Les Paul has a good section on this) where inconsistencies between a fake and a real guitar can be found. And this works if you happen to do your research and are therefore in the know of how to spot a fake, but some people aren't. They just don't think to do their own research. A lot of customers who buy these guitars are beginners or parents buying their first guitar for their son, and they're ignorant to the risks of making such a transaction. They don't know if what they're seeing is real or not. They jump on the deal because it seems like an amazing deal without second thoughts, or they just don't care about whether its fake or not because they know their kid will just quit in 6 months anyway.

And even that scenario assumes you can see what you're buying. A lot of people fall for buying a fake, simply because the guitar they're buying isn't actually the guitar that's being advertised. The photographs given in the listing could merely be stock photos of the real thing, or photos of the real thing ripped from somewhere else on the internet, so there's no way of knowing what you'll actually buy until it comes to your house.
Quote by Knarrenheino
I was thinking about that too, "less probable that it's fake" etc. But if fake guitars are sold for 150-350, why not make a Gibson headstock and sell it for more? Of course, you'd assume that the average Epiphone buyer is no guitar expert who will quickly tell it's fake, but then again, not all (cough) Gibson buyers are experts either, so why not fool them instead for more profit?

Not saying they wouldn't, just that I still don't fully understand the logic behind faking Epiphones.

But then again, never assume what people do is logical.

Sometimes Chinese counterfeiters do sell the counterfeits for around the used price of the real thing.

But like I've said above, a significant majority of buyers of these guitars are beginners or parents buying their first guitar for their kid, and simply don't question whether or not the guitar is real, because at the end of the day if it looks good enough to them, its probably good enough for their kid, who chances are, is going to quit after 6 months anyway. May as well put a Gibson logo on it.

I think one significant reason for the counterfeiters selling the guitars at the prices they do is because there is another demographic of people who buy these fakes who are already aware of what they're buying as being fake. Such a demographic often buys these guitars as projects. Such as doing fretwork, completely re-wiring the guitar, replacing pickups and hardware etc. for peanuts compared to buying the real thing. Selling the guitars so cheaply provides for that group. So that's just another incentive to do so.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Feb 14, 2015,
#29
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
There are a couple of problems with this hypothesis. There are websites (My Les Paul has a good section on this) where inconsistencies between a fake and a real guitar can be found. And this works if you happen to do your research and are therefore in the know of how to spot a fake, but some people aren't. They just don't think to do their own research. A lot of customers who buy these guitars are beginners or parents buying their first guitar for their son, and they're ignorant to the risks of making such a transaction. They don't know if what they're seeing is real or not. They jump on the deal because it seems like an amazing deal without second thoughts, or they just don't care about whether its fake or not because they know their kid will just quit in 6 months anyway.

And even that scenario assumes you can see what you're buying. A lot of people fall for buying a fake, simply because the guitar they're buying isn't actually the guitar that's being advertised. The photographs given in the listing could merely be stock photos of the real thing, or photos of the real thing ripped from somewhere else on the internet, so there's no way of knowing what you'll actually buy until it comes to your house.

Sometimes Chinese counterfeiters do sell the counterfeits for around the used price of the real thing.

But like I've said above, a significant majority of buyers of these guitars are beginners or parents buying their first guitar for their kid, and simply don't question whether or not the guitar is real, because at the end of the day if it looks good enough to them, its probably good enough for their kid, who chances are, is going to quit after 6 months anyway. May as well put a Gibson logo on it.

I think one significant reason for the counterfeiters selling the guitars at the prices they do is because there is another demographic of people who buy these fakes who are already aware of what they're buying as being fake. Such a demographic often buys these guitars as projects. Such as doing fretwork, completely re-wiring the guitar, replacing pickups and hardware etc. for peanuts compared to buying the real thing. Selling the guitars so cheaply provides for that group. So that's just another incentive to do so.


well i'm not disputing that most buyers aren't up on how to tell if it's a fake. the dirt cheap price and oh yeah it's coming direct from china should raise a flag or two. my only real point was that faking a $150 guitar (we're talking new street price not used) probably wouldn't be very profitable. lets face it those guitars are made for next to nothing already so it might be tough to cheap out even more without it being very noticeable.

here's a fact that if more people knew might help stem off the buy straight from china cheaper thing. all products made for non chinese comapanies (like Gibson or Epiphone) are considered foreign goods and are not sold directly to the chinese people. you want an Epiphone guitar in china you have to buy it as an import. the guitar literally goes out from china and has to be imported back in. this has to do with the gov't and taxes not to mention them protecting domestic producers. my brother works over there so this comes from a reliable source. in most cases that guitar will cost more to buy in china than it does in the US. my brother goes over to japan to buy guitars when he wants a new one.
#30
WHich is why the vast majority of fakes are not $150 guitars. The cheapest fake that I've seen is one of an Epiphone G400. And it was selling new for $100 at the counterfeit website.
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#31
at this price point, it doesn't matter if it is fake or not if it plays well. epiphones don't have a high resale value to begin with.

i'd buy the guitar off of how well it plays, i wouldn't pay anymore than 200 bucks for it either way (i'd prefer to pay around 150).
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Last edited by gumbilicious at Feb 14, 2015,