#1
Hey, so right now I'm trying to record some music via my Boss 1180 which is a digital multitrack recorder. Im recording by micing my amp.
So the clean sounds great, but trying to record distortion sounds like complete garbage.

Is this because im using a digital recorder, or would I be much better off with a digital interface and mixing it on my computer? or is this maybe because i have a cheaper mic?

My setup if it helps
Vox Valvetronix VT-50
Samson CS-1 mic
Boss 1180 recorder

any help would be greatly appreciated
#2
A better mic would certainly help, but there's nothing wrong with your multitracker - boss make some pretty good kit.

Have you tried playing with the EQ of the recorded sound? That will make a big difference. Also, experiment with positioning but you'll probably want the mic as close to your amp as possible to get the best sound avoiding as much room ambiance as you can.

Make sure your amp isn't too loud as well. Keep the volume low, and set the input levels on your 1180 so you peak well below the clipping level.

Whether you'll be better off with an interface or not, only you can decide. If you're just a hobbyist, the main difference is preference. You already have a good DAW that will get you some great quality recordings, but if you wanted to learn and progress to recording professionally you'll need to make the switch to a PC based DAW at some point
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#3
It's most likely a combination of the mic and mic placement. Try moving the mic around, at different angles, distances and anything you can think of.
#4
Quote by captaininsano67
Hey, so right now I'm trying to record some music via my Boss 1180 which is a digital multitrack recorder. Im recording by micing my amp.
So the clean sounds great, but trying to record distortion sounds like complete garbage.

Is this because im using a digital recorder, or would I be much better off with a digital interface and mixing it on my computer? or is this maybe because i have a cheaper mic?

My setup if it helps
Vox Valvetronix VT-50
Samson CS-1 mic
Boss 1180 recorder

any help would be greatly appreciated


Sounds like too much gain and you are clipping your mic or input signal. Digital clipping always sounds like garbage so spend some time getting the gain exactly right.

Step 1 in any recording is setting the gain.
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Last edited by Cajundaddy at Feb 14, 2015,
#6
I would take a minute to figure out what you mean by garbage. you should be able to get something decent out of the gear you mentioned -

so - mic placement is key - do you have both capsules for that mic? Ill bet the cs-2 one will work better on an amp. Try turning your gain down on the amp. High gain settings may sound great in the room - but when you close mic it it may sound terribly small.. thin and buzzy. John Petrucci had a tip - play a low palm muted E chord - and roll the gain back untill the low end cleans up.

I would think that if your clean sounds don't clip the signal chain the dirty wont either - because the clean sounds have much more dynamic variance - regardless make sure its not your preamp on the boss unit breaking up.

Hope this helps

dave
www.thedukewestern.com
#7
I agree, mic placement and room acoustics will play a big role. I've never used the Samson mic you have but it should be OK for the job. Move it around. If you are recording up close presently and don't like it , move back a little or off to one side or another away from the center of the speaker cone. I have a VOX VT 30 that I record a lot with and it sounds pretty good both clean and crunchy. I have miked it with a Shure SM57, a Shure 87A condenser and a Rode NT1 and they all sound fairly good after I play with it awhile. Try two mics one up fairly close and one a few feet away. Record both at the same time and see if you can't get what you are looking for by blending and panning the two tracks. There's nothing wrong with your recorder. The Boss workstations sound nice. Remember like the old computer term: GIGO "Garbage in-garbage out". It applies in recording also. Make sure you have the sound you want to start with before recording. You can't polish a turd.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Feb 16, 2015,
#8
From a hobbyist's perspective, mic placement is the most important thing in getting a good tone.

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#9
GIGO - garbage in garbage out, most likely your problem is not the recorder, especially if you get good clean sound.
Try using less distortion, it might sound dry while tracking but when you stack them it adds up.
Also it could be the mic - if not mistaken this is a condenser mic and you might be overloading it from too close. See if you can get a dynamic, the go to is SM57.