#1
Hey guys, I'm thinking about purchasing a Schecter guitar that will have a sustainiac neck pickup in it. I like to try before I buy, and luckily a coworker has a Schecter Loomis model with the sutainiac. I tried it out, and experienced nothing but uncontrollable feedback between notes during sweeps and simple solo licks. When this was happening, the pickup was NOT being used as a sustainer, but just simply being used for a neck pickup. This was happening on the high gain setting of my EVH 5150iii 50w amplifier. The problem persisted even when I turned the gain down to about 9 o clock. What is causing the extreme feedback? I don't want to get a sustainiac if I can't use it on my high gain channel! That's not metal!

Note: I was running it through an MXR smart gate.
#2
Hmm, not too sure, I have one on my guitar and I use an NS-2 between it and the amp and the feedback works properly, I'd probably look at it again and make sure you don't have it turned on when playing, that's all I can really suggest.
#3
If you're going to try before you buy, try a new one. No telling what your "coworker" has screwed with on his guitar. "Well, nothing at all! Except for this one little thing..."

I have sustainers (mine are Fernandes, but one of them uses a Sustainiac driver) on several guitars. None of them use the sustainer driver as a neck pickup. I've played guitars that have the sustainer/sustainiac driver doing double duty, and there were no issues.
This is a typical installation on one of my sustainer guitars. The neck humbucker position has the single coil size sustainer driver installed on the fretboard side and a DiMarzio Fast Track II single coil size humbucker installed on the bridge side within the same pickup ring. When the sustainer isn't running, the DiMarzio is the neck pickup.



I'm betting that you had the sustainer on the whole time and turned "off" the harmonic selector switch (which doesn't turn anything off). The sustainer driver is a decent enough pickup when the sustainer itself is off; it acts just like any other pickup.

One other thing -- on the Fernandes sustainer (and, I believe, on the Sustainiac PC board as well) there are three screwdriver-adjusted pots that allow you to tweak things. One is the Sustainer Intensity. I've got that run out to one of the standard control pots on my guitar (I don't really need two volumes, two treble rolloffs) instead. Very useful.
#4
The Fernandes sustainer/Dimarzio pickup combo is an awesome idea! By the way, the guitar I'm looking at is the Schecter banshee elite-7 FRS. I'm very new to the world of sustainers, so I'm just trying to be well informed before I buy. The sustainer was off during my playing, and the feedback did not occur when he played through his mesa/boogie dual rectifier. It's almost like it just didn't agree with my EVH 5150iii.
#5
Quote by gunsnroses109
The Fernandes sustainer/Dimarzio pickup combo is an awesome idea! By the way, the guitar I'm looking at is the Schecter banshee elite-7 FRS. I'm very new to the world of sustainers, so I'm just trying to be well informed before I buy. The sustainer was off during my playing, and the feedback did not occur when he played through his mesa/boogie dual rectifier. It's almost like it just didn't agree with my EVH 5150iii.


Sustainers can be a bit tricky, but perhaps the amount of gain from your 5150 had something to do with it. One of the benefits of a sustainer is that it can sustain a note without ANY compression or sustain-enhancing gain from the amp. In fact, you can pretty much record clean direct to the board with a sustainer, and still get the classic amp-feedback transition to an octave harmonic to play with.
#7
The neck pup functions when the sustainer is turned off. If you are a big fan of your neck pup and you want a specific kind then you wouldn't want a sustainer because you can't switch the neck pup out.