#1
So, today my new Les Paul Special DC 2015 arrived from Thomann. It's a lovely guitar (in my opinion) but unfortunately there's a problem with the nut. The edge of the 'zero fret' part of the nut is not completely smooth. When I bend the high E and B strings, they 'stick' slightly to the left, instead of returning to their proper place. I'm talking less than a millimetre of difference here, but it still obviously matters.

What should I do? I'm tempted to just return it, but delivery takes such a long time I'm willing to consider alternatives. I thought, perhaps, thicker strings might not 'catch' in the tiny imperfection on the nut; Gibson ship their guitars with pathetically skinny strings.

Thoughts?
#2
Give it back. If you buy something new you must expect it to sound and play good. If there's something wrong, send it back. If that's the only guitar you have, then I'd get some cheap acoustic to play on until you get the guitar you want(that actually has no flaws).
Oh, and I'd stay away from Gibson's new stuff. I'd look around used and get something like that, you'll be sure its good plus it's a bit cheaper.
Well, you can call me crazy
You can call me wrong, 'cause
See I was born a liar, albatross
Fly on, fly on
#3
I have a lot of guitars, so returning it isn't a problem in that regard thankfully. I'm just impatient

I'm tempted to try thicker strings, just in case, but I'm worried that it'll affect my ability to return it.

I've heard a lot of mixed opinions of Gibson's new stuff. This is my first one. It seems like a very nice and well set up guitar to me, apart from this minor imperfection.
Last edited by Pagan-Pie at Feb 16, 2015,
#4
Quote by Pagan-Pie
I have a lot of guitars, so returning it isn't a problem in that regard thankfully. I'm just impatient

I'm tempted to try thicker strings, just in case, but I'm worried that it'll affect my ability to return it.

You can always try to smooth out the nut, but on a new guitar there's no point if you can always send it back.
Well, you can call me crazy
You can call me wrong, 'cause
See I was born a liar, albatross
Fly on, fly on
#5
Smooth out the nut? You do realise he's talking about the adjustable brass-nut found on 2015 Gibsons?
"Your signature can not be longer than 250 characters."

How you know you have too many guitars...

Apparently once also known as PonyFan #834553.
#6
Quote by HomerSGR
Smooth out the nut? You do realise he's talking about the adjustable brass-nut found on 2015 Gibsons?

Oh. Shit, I thought they were bone. give it back, man. Ask for a guitar made properly, not the BS gibson makes today.
Well, you can call me crazy
You can call me wrong, 'cause
See I was born a liar, albatross
Fly on, fly on
#7
Yeah, this is very disappointing. It should have been obvious to whoever checked the guitar. I was torn between this and a Fender American Special Tele (don't have a massive budget) and I think I might have to exchange it for one of them.
#8
There's no problem getting this nut in shape, though I'd definitely have the shop you got it from do the work or get permission to have your shop bill Gibson. Brass nuts have been around since the late '60's and they're not all that difficult to work on . Any repairman who's been doing tech work for longer than 60 minutes will know how to handle it, and it's a 10 minute job. The chances of you getting another Gibson with exactly the same problem (or a new one) are high.

Gibsons have shipped with 10's since the dawn of time (though the original '50's versions may have had thicker strings). They may be shipping them with 9's within the last year or two. What your preference may be is a different story, and if you need to tweak the nut for whatever non-standard string gauge you like, that's on your dime on any guitar. Thicker strings won't help the problem, but a bit of tech love will.
#9
Quote by Fryderyczek
Oh. Shit, I thought they were bone. give it back, man. Ask for a guitar made properly, not the BS gibson makes today.


Gibson's new nuts (as of 2015) are brass, and adjustable for height, and they use a zero-fret. Brass is good (I've got a number of older guitars with brass nuts), adjustable for height is very good (Gibson historically sends out their guitars with too-high nuts) and zero fret is...well...it's okay.

Older Gibson nuts aren't (and I don't remember many being) bone. They're a cheapass plastic called Corian. It's always been amazing to me that people are willing to pay around six grand for guitars that have rosewood fretboards, non-stainless frets, plastic inlays ("pearloid" = plastic), crap plastic tuner buttons, cheap bridges/tailpieces and a crap finish.
#10
Do you think it would be possible that Thomann or Gibson would reimburse me for tech work? I'd much rather do that than return it. It's a great guitar.

Still haven't got used to this G-Force thing though...
#11
Quote by Pagan-Pie
So, today my new Les Paul Special DC 2015 arrived from Thomann. It's a lovely guitar (in my opinion)


Is this one of the Specials with no pickguard, a single tone and volume control and a non-intonatable bridge? Like this one from Sweetwater?:

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/LPSD15YTSN-15?adpos=1o1&creative=55280244121&device=c&matchtype=&network=g&gclid=CjwKEAiAx4anBRDz6JLYjMDxoQYSJAA4loRmrCxUFL7bbkN6aMI-XvQaVDc1ZNbgStCEmDaQ91xt0RoCdrnw_wcB

Or is it more like this VOS version with pickguard and four pots and a pickguard?:

http://www2.gibson.com/Products/Electric-Guitars/Les-Paul/Gibson-Custom/1960-Les-Paul-Special-Double-VOS/Features.aspx



For the longest time I thought these were crap student guitars (well, that's what they were designed to be, honestly -- a "pricepoint" guitar). A friend of mine has an old (as in late '50's old) one in TV yellow with extensive cracking and checking and fret ends that cut your hands and a baseball neck, with miserable action, and he paid absolutely silly money for it ("it's vintage, doncha know"). It sounds like...like a mahogany guitar with P90's.

Lately I've come to appreciate them a bit more, and I noticed that Rondo Music had a version called the Agile AD-2300. Their P90's are pretty good, actually, and this one came with a TOM and tailpiece, a slightly less base-ball-bat neck, jumbo frets, a 14" radius, a bound fretboard, real rosewood fretboard and real MOP trap inlays. Otherwise, pretty much the same guitar in terms of body thickness, materials (two or three-piece mahogany body, single-piece mahogany neck, decent Grovers, Tusq nut. At $259 it was a no-brainer, so it went on the "maybe, eventually" list. Then the price went up to $299 and then they were discontinued. Everyone who had one raved about it (your child is always smarter, you know?), but they weren't big sellers and suddenly they were thin on the ground.

I came across one (thanks to an alert from a forum member) in Vancouver, of all places, and paid the $130 the guy was asking and had it mailed. Perfect guitar, with signs of lack of use (frets were green and scratchy, strings had rusticles), but it arrived with a pair of $185/pair (CAD money) hand wound P90's done by Mike Reilander with Alnico II magnets. Restrung, cleaned up, frets polished, etc., this is essentially a brand new guitar that plays stunningly well. Like this, but with black witches' hat knobs (rather than reflectors) and in a very rich "caramel" clear cost over mahogany:



I took it over to the friend's house to compare to his Olde Clunk. His, of course, is sticky with mojo. His reaction, upon playing mine, was, "Damn. DAMN! damn!"

Obviously, I'm appreciating this guitar design a bit more, but I'm not at all convinced that the 2015 Gibson version is really worth the bucks. Meanwhile, it does a mean Mississippi Queen through a cranked JTM45...
#12
It's the 2015 version, with no pickguard. It has a super slim but wide neck, which for me is ideal.

The new Gibsons do seem to be a bit over priced, but I thought this one (I paid 650 pounds for it new) seemed pretty good value for a USA built guitar. Unfortunately, since I live in N. Ireland, there isn't a great deal of choice involved when buying a new guitar, which is why I ordered this one from Germany.

And that guitar looks totally awesome. I'm jealous.
#13
Quote by Pagan-Pie
It's the 2015 version, with no pickguard. It has a super slim but wide neck, which for me is ideal.


I like wide/thin necks, too.

Your nut issue can be handled with a bit of tech care.

I agree that Gibson should probably be putting out a much better guitar, given the money they're charging, but the sad truth is that they frequently don't. I bought a Custom Shop Axcess Custom a few years ago. Everything's custom shop these days, of course, but this was a black Axcess, with Floyd, with the Custom appointments, including gold hardware, ebony fretboard with MOP blocks, extra binding and the bigger, split-diamond inlaid headstock). Over $4K US. Supposed to have been PLEK'd at the factory, but it was choking bends up high. We put it on the PLEK in San Francisco and the analysis software found it had a classic Gibson Hump (the frets are higher after the neck meets the body). The PLEK took care of that in short order and the guitar has, ever since, played like the wind. But that was $200+ (I had the frets superglued as well) just to fix a Gibson problem. It was far faster and easier to do that than it would have been to ship the guitar back to Gibson to wait the 5-7 months Gibson was taking to build another. And no guarantee that it would be any better. This way, it was in on Saturday morning and picked up on Monday afternoon.
#14
Send it back and buy an Asian guitar instead of that Gibson crap. But first take close up photos and post them on the internet so that other people might learn from your experience and not waste their money on a Gibson.