#1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXsuCNtMOYA

I'm playing this for two auditions in the upcoming weeks. I know I seriously ****ed up at about 2:01 but other than that I think this was okay.

Any kind of feedback is welcome, from right hand posture to phrasing to anything else you might notice
#2
I wouldn't pretend to comment on your playing, but your right hand looks at little uncomfortable to me, positioned almost directly above your fingers. If you want serious feedback on classical technique, the Usenet classical guitar group is still active, and has some heavy-duty players and teachers. This is one entry point:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=en#!forum/rec.music.classical.guitar

You will need to register/log in in order to post.


It would help to know for what you are auditioning.
#3
Quote by Tony Done
I wouldn't pretend to comment on your playing, but your right hand looks at little uncomfortable to me, positioned almost directly above your fingers. If you want serious feedback on classical technique, the Usenet classical guitar group is still active, and has some heavy-duty players and teachers. This is one entry point:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=en#!forum/rec.music.classical.guitar

You will need to register/log in in order to post.

It would help to know for what you are auditioning.


Oh, sorry, forgot to mention that

This is for two music school auditions: Seton Hill University and Indiana University of Pennsylvania. This is my only piece for Seton Hill, and 1 of 3 for Indiana.

As far as right hand technique goes, I have been told that it looks uncomfortable and I'm working on trying to fix that, but hey, if that's my biggest problem I'll take it.

Thanks for the link though, I'll check that out
#4
I hear a bunch of muffled notes, and some that only sound for a fraction of a second that seem like they should ring as long as the others. Several places it looks like you're fretting too close to or on top of the frets. At 1:04 if the change from minor to major is supposed to be there, it needs to be more distinct. I'm not familiar with the piece, but it sounds out of place to me, don't fret that note so soon.

Basically, you're doing things my fingers cannot physically do, (tendon injury many years ago) and I know little about the classical style. The main thing I hear is you need to practice getting each note clear and distinct. Too many are muffled or don't sustain the way they should.

I won't go into hand position, I didn't pay a lot of attention to it I was more listening than anything else. The one thing I did see was fretting too close to the frets or on top of them. Keep the fingers in the middle when you can, and yes I know some of those stretches are not easy.

Best thing I can offer is start practicing in total darkness. Yes I mean that, I did it for 2 years in the late 70's. Your accuracy will get a lot better and you'll get a lot better at getting the notes clear and distinct the way they should, especially for classical. I started with the simplest stuff I could already play without thinking about it much, and started progressing to the hardest tunes I wanted to learn, eventually learning about a half dozen songs from scratch in total darkness.

This is one of those I learned in the dark, you want every note to sustain like you hear on this one unless you chop it off intentionally. In 1980 I could duplicate this...I'm a little rusty on it now but can still come close. Learned it from scratch in total darkness.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HvEIEWHDsk

I know it sounds weird, but it makes a huge difference, you'll just about think you're learning all over again, but it won't take long and you'll start to get the hang of it. Just keep at it and remember...Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, Jeff Heally and Jose Feliciano never could see to begin with...They did it, I did it, you can too.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#5
Hi,

You're off to a good start. I noticed that you did a good job of placing the melodic line over the harmony, and what mistakes you did make you played straight through.

Technically, both hands look odd. Your right hand looks stiff and uncomfortable, especially with the wrist angle. You want to have it nearly straight with your arm. That in mind, it doesn't seem to be a huge issue at this point, just expect your future teacher to work on it.

As far as your left hand goes, you want to make sure you have your fingers nearly parallel to the frets. You've got a bit of an electric guitarist's angle. Think about keeping your fingers parallel to the frets and your thumb low on the back of the neck. This might also help to clean up some of the barres; some of the middle voices are getting lost on the barre chords. Straightening the index finger can help with that.

I agree with what has been said up above. Some notes don't last as I think they could. Working on the barres may help, and I would also practice switching between each chord individually. I.e. drill the transition between chord I and II, II and III, III and IV, etc. Make a little exercise out of each change.

Phrasing, you could put a bit of variety in the dynamics but I think as an audition it's very important that you play loudly. Also, you can give a bit of push and pull in the tempo, though again it's not a major point.

Keep practicing it and especially work on smoothing it out. With a few weeks until your auditions I think you'll do fine as long as you keep up on the piece. Just a note, if you don't read sheet music often get a headstart and practice reading. They'll likely have you sightread a short excerpt just to check where you're at. If they do, it is much better to play VERY slowly and in even time rather than trying to play too fast and then having to stop and getting lost.

Good luck!
#6
I know that tune isn't exactly 'slow' but it sounded a bit rushed. As if you were just trying to get the notes out without really focusing on having them sound nice. You do clearly know the song well though so I'd suggest just slowing it down a bit and making sure every note rings out as well as it should.

You may not have noticed many mistakes as you were playing so watch the video yourself a few times to target your problem areas.

Good luck!
#7
I think you're pretty close. As has already been said, just need to practice a little more on getting some notes to ring out cleanly.
#9
Good luck. Keep working at it, and again do try practicing in the dark, it does make a difference. And work on fretting in the middle of the frets, not too close to the next fret up, that was the main thing I saw.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#10
Quote by Paleo Pete
Good luck. Keep working at it, and again do try practicing in the dark, it does make a difference. And work on fretting in the middle of the frets, not too close to the next fret up, that was the main thing I saw.


No, you should be fretting as close to against the fret as you can. Notes will buzz otherwise.
#11
Really? I've been doing it wrong for over 50 years? All these several hundred nights onstage I've been buzzing all night long and never had a clue?

I looked at your profile...born in 1993...I had been playing over 30 years when you were born, I think if that were true I would have known it while your daddy was in diapers...I don't normally react like this but when someone comes along and tells me I've been doing it wrong for over 50 years...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#12
Quote by Paleo Pete
Really? I've been doing it wrong for over 50 years? All these several hundred nights onstage I've been buzzing all night long and never had a clue?

I looked at your profile...born in 1993...I had been playing over 30 years when you were born, I think if that were true I would have known it while your daddy was in diapers...I don't normally react like this but when someone comes along and tells me I've been doing it wrong for over 50 years...


I never said you were playing wrong. No, you probably haven't been buzzing on stage in the slightest. As you said, you know little about classical style so I assume your gigs have been on either electric guitars or steel string acoustics. On those types of guitars, you can get away with fretting towards the middle of the fret and not having to worry about buzz.

This is classical guitar which corresponds to specific classical technique. In this style, you need to be as close to the fret as possible for the best tone. Fretting towards the middle is risky and can very easily cause a note to buzz.

But, since I'm so young, perhaps the words and performances of more experienced players will carry more weight.

"The fingers of the left hand should press the string with the fingertip bending the 1st Falange in the shape of a hammer while keeping it as close as possible to the fret"
-Julio Sagreras, Guitar Lessons book 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIrriGJYnEY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r2Xdlgii-Rc

https://emedia.leeward.hawaii.edu/frary/buzz.htm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCeebWgjrrU
#13
I never played classical and didn't study it, but i did own a nylon string classical guitar that I played for about 5 years, I learned Sultans of Swing on it so that was around 1976 or so, never had any string buzz.

If that's the way classical is taught I won't argue with it, I don't know much about that technique but I do know I never had any trouble with it playing same as I do steel strings. Same as here, I see him fretting in the middle of the frets a lot, and I hear no string buzz. I hear a few muffled notes, that's already been discussed...but no buzzing even though he's fretting in the middle of the frets a lot.

If fretting as close to the frets as you can is the proper way, OK I'll shut up...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...