#1
Do you think i should sell my acoustic to buy a semi acoustic?
i prefer the sound of a semi and i have played one already unplugged and sounds better than my own acoustic
what do you think?
#3
Quote by daniel_tones
Do you think i should sell my acoustic to buy a semi acoustic?
i prefer the sound of a semi and i have played one already unplugged and sounds better than my own acoustic
what do you think?
I think you're basically tone deaf, the guitar is probably all laminate, and you haven't changed the strings on it in a year or so.

That notwithstanding, I'm going to assume that what you mean by "semi-acoustic", are guitars along the lines of the Gibson ES-335, Epiphone "Dot", Ibanez Artcore, or similar. These guitars all contain a "tone block". running through the center, the entire length of the guitar.

This contributes greatly to sustain, which may be factor in your liking them.

These are thin body electrics, which have some internal chamber volume, which characterizes them as "semi-acoustic".

We have to be careful with the terminology here, as Gretsch, makes some thin body fully hollow guitars, which could also be loosely called "semi-acoustic", by virtue of the slim body.

I have two hybrid semi-acoustic 12 stings, which I play from time to time unplugged. The best thing about playing them unplugged, is when they're slightly out of tune, it doesn't bother me one tenth as much as when they're amped up. I have an acoustic 12 string as well, and sometimes I get too much compression from the top, and the guitar is a bit too harmonically rich. The semis are a bit thinner in harmonic content, and that works out fine, at least with respect to the 12 string sound not being so oppressive. I don't know if this attaches to your experience with 6 string variants of the same type guitars or not... I would say that an electric guitar unplugged, isn't going to make any mistakes as obvious, simply by virtue of the reduced volume. Plugging in and turning up, tends to put your technique under a microscope, so to speak.

Personally, I tend to never sell anything I buy. So, I'd say you should just go ahead and buy the semi-acoustic guitar, and keep the acoustic you have. If that's not practical, do what you think is right for you. Yours is a question, which as Tony has pointed out, lacks information sufficient, for us to give a definitive answer. You know, basic stuff like, "what kind of acoustic do you have, what are you thinking about buying? We ask the hard questions here.

There actually isn't a correct answer, as we're dealing with more than the average amount of subjectivity, since the two guitar styles are so very different.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 20, 2015,
#4
do you mean an acoustic-electric guitar?

the acoustic-electric and acoustic versions of any given guitar should sound the same unplugged. there is no magical tone improvement from adding electronics.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#5
Quote by patticake
do you mean an acoustic-electric guitar?

the acoustic-electric and acoustic versions of any given guitar should sound the same unplugged. there is no magical tone improvement from adding electronics.

Another worthy attempt at knowing the unknowable...
#6
I'm kind of wondering what acoustic he has that sounds worse than a semi-acoustic unplugged.
#7
I have noticed that folks from Europe generally use the term "semi-acoustic" to refer to what we call an "acoustic-electric"... An acoustic guitar with a built-in pickup and some sort of tone controls.

We refer to guitars like the ones Cranky mentions as "semi-hollowbodies"... Electric guitars with some degree of having an acoustic soundchamber.
#8
Quote by Bikewer
I have noticed that folks from Europe generally use the term "semi-acoustic" to refer to what we call an "acoustic-electric"... An acoustic guitar with a built-in pickup and some sort of tone controls.
I have noticed Europeans and the Brits, tend to call a "flat top" with piezo, "electric acoustic", as opposed to us in the "former colonies northwest", who call them "acoustic electric".

Quote by Bikewer
We refer to guitars like the ones Cranky mentions as "semi-hollowbodies"... Electric guitars with some degree of having an acoustic soundchamber.
There are plenty of electric guitars available, which have fully hollow bodies. (as I'm sure you know). We call them, appropriately, "hollow body electrics".

I simply don' know how one could arrive at the conclusion, that because a standard flat top steel string has a pickup installed, that would make it "semi-acoustic"....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 21, 2015,
#9
Quote by Bikewer
I have noticed that folks from Europe generally use the term "semi-acoustic" to refer to what we call an "acoustic-electric"... An acoustic guitar with a built-in pickup and some sort of tone controls.

We refer to guitars like the ones Cranky mentions as "semi-hollowbodies"... Electric guitars with some degree of having an acoustic soundchamber.


OK, I was thinking he meant semi-hollow body. We can't really give him an informed opinion until he tells us which model guitar he owns and the one he's looking at.
#10
^^ (Captaincranky) I think (don't quote me ) we tend to use "electro-acoustic" for acoustics which have electronics in them (in the UK/Ireland I mean, not sure about the rest of Europe).

I stopped usin the term "semi-acoustic" since it's too confusing (as this thread demonstrates). I'd generally use the term "semi-hollow" for something like a 335. Though whether that's just me who does that, I dunno
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#11
a semi acoustic is, indeed, a semi-hollow body guitar like a taylor T5. i've never played one that sounded better unplugged than an acoustic, so i really doubted that was what he meant.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#12
Quote by Captaincranky
I have noticed Europeans and the Brits, tend to call a "flat top" with piezo, "electric acoustic", as opposed to us in the "former colonies northwest", who call them "acoustic electric".

There are plenty of electric guitars available, which have fully hollow bodies. (as I'm sure you know). We call them, appropriately, "hollow body electrics".

They are generally much thinner than an acoustic, not made with acoustic tonewoods and designed to be plugged in. Although they would sound better than a solid body electric unplugged, I can't imagine that any would sound better than even a low quality acoustic.

I simply don' know how one could arrive at the conclusion, that because a standard flat top steel string has a pickup installed, that would make it "semi-acoustic"....


It' still an acoustic...with electronics.
Last edited by rohash at Feb 21, 2015,
#13
Quote by Dave_Mc
^^ (Captaincranky) I think (don't quote me ) we tend to use "electro-acoustic" for acoustics which have electronics in them (in the UK/Ireland I mean, not sure about the rest of Europe).
Well Dave, let me say in advance, you've brought this post on yourself. (That should absolve me of any wrongdoing for the felony boredom and pedantry which I about to inflict on you).

I was sitting tagging and categorizing a bunch of erotic art, and erstwhile thinking to myself, "you know, I think the people of the UK call electric-acoustics, electro-acoustics". I dropped everything I was doing, and ran back to correct my mistake. But, lo and behold, it had already been exposed...

In spite of the slight spelling difference, I do change the initials from "A/E" to E/A", when I'm discussing this type of guitar with anyone from the UK, and the rest of Europe. I believe our ANZAC brethren also refer to acoustics with pickups as "electro-acoustics". Since I got the convention mostly from Thomann. (dot.wherever), I have to assume their English section of the site is translating in British English, or, 'actual' English', as the case may be.

As it turns out, any of the terms are, idiomatic, colloquial, or vernacular, as electric, acoustic, and electro, are all adjectives. And here we have Wiki, rushing in the save the grammatical day:
An adjectival noun is an adjective functioning as a noun. For example, in the rich and the poor, the adjectives rich and poor are used to denote people who are rich and poor respectively.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adjectival_noun
Quote by Dave_Mc
I stopped using the term "semi-acoustic" since it's too confusing (as this thread demonstrates). I'd generally use the term "semi-hollow" for something like a 335. Though whether that's just me who does that, I dunno
If you had used the term, "semi-acoustic", that's exactly what I would have taken as the meaning, an ES-335 type guitar or similar. This whole thread is on semantic thin ice, since if you would have said a, "hollow body electric", I would have taken that to mean, a full depth archtop (guitar), with F-holes, and not something shallow, (<2'' or 48mm), in the same configuration...

I have to say, "it's a fine tin of worms we've popped the top on this time".
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 21, 2015,
#15
Quote by Tony Done
No use arguing with Dave-Mc, the Irish have as all beat where literacy is concerned.


I would say they have a huge leg up in "fantasy literature", as, "The Book of Invasions", puts King Arthur & Camelot, as well as our Paul Bunyan stories to shame with the sheer scope of imagination/fabrication it encompasses. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lebor_Gab%C3%A1la_%C3%89renn

Merlin is just one of two, (primary sorcerers), in Camelot. Whereas, the entirety of the Tuatha de Danaan were either mystical beings, or possibly space aliens.

This comes as no surprise really. Isn't Ireland the home of the "Blarney Stone"?

Quote by Tony Done
I also use the term semi-hollow for things like the 335, the term "hollow" is a bit more vague, I would put the 330 in there. - That's why I didn't know what the OP meant.
Which alludes to the tone block running through the 335 and similar. IMHO, "semi-acoustic" is appropriate as well...

OK, as far as I am able to divine, the TS didn't know what he was talking about either. Which is compounded by that fact he hasn't dropped back with a clarification.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 21, 2015,
#17
Quote by Tony Done
They were also the last stronghold of Christian literacy, at least in the North, when the heathen hordes overran Europe in the Dark ages. Where else would you find pubs that look like Guinness-serving libraries?
No, I actually wasn't aware of that. But then, I don't even frequent bars here in the US.

On the subject of mingling fact and mythology during the middle ages, have you ever seen this version: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0349683/ of, "King Arthur", with Clive Owen and Keira Knightley?
#18
Quote by Captaincranky
Well Dave, let me say in advance, you've brought this post on yourself. (That should absolve me of any wrongdoing for the felony boredom and pedantry which I about to inflict on you).

I was sitting tagging and categorizing a bunch of erotic art, and erstwhile thinking to myself, "you know, I think the people of the UK call electric-acoustics, electro-acoustics". I dropped everything I was doing, and ran back to correct my mistake. But, lo and behold, it had already been exposed...

In spite of the slight spelling difference, I do change the initials from "A/E" to E/A", when I'm discussing this type of guitar with anyone from the UK, and the rest of Europe. I believe our ANZAC brethren also refer to acoustics with pickups as "electro-acoustics". Since I got the convention mostly from Thomann. (dot.wherever), I have to assume their English section of the site is translating in British English, or, 'actual' English', as the case may be.

As it turns out, any of the terms are, idiomatic, colloquial, or vernacular, as electric, acoustic, and electro, are all adjectives. And here we have Wiki, rushing in the save the grammatical day:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adjectival_noun
If you had used the term, "semi-acoustic", that's exactly what I would have taken as the meaning, an ES-335 type guitar or similar. This whole thread is on semantic thin ice, since if you would have said a, "hollow body electric", I would have taken that to mean, a full depth archtop (guitar), with F-holes, and not something shallow, (<2'' or 48mm), in the same configuration...

I have to say, "it's a fine tin of worms we've popped the top on this time".


LOL

Yeah if someone said "semi-acoustic" to me I'd assume they meant a 335 or similar too- just I don't really use it myself since it's kind of confusing and "semi-hollow" is less ambiguous (I think ).

Not sure I'd go by Thomann for instruction on British English, though It reads like it's been translated by a German, most of the time (I did a little German at school), and in fact might even be closer to American English a lot of the time (it calls valves "tubes", for example).

Quote by Tony Done
No use arguing with Dave-Mc, the Irish have as all beat where literacy is concerned.


I dunno about that
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?