#1
Hi, I am looking for a new guitar, I'm looking for a electro-acoustic guitar, I play a lot on the lower frets so a cutaway would be the best for me, My budget is about $700-800 dollars, I wanted a solid guitar, so the martin drs-2 was great however I found out that the neck was made from some crap called stratabond, I have been playing with rosewood neck guitars and they seem fine to me.
Another problem the drs-2 has is the matte/satin finish on the top of the guitar, although is solid spruce, I have read some reviews and they say that the top wears out very quickly, so a glossy finish guitar would also be great. I don't care the brand or the place they where made, the price lowers if the place where they are is not usa. Thats why the drs-2 (made in mexico) retails for about $800 dollars. I also don't care about the brand. I'm looking for a quality ACOUSTIC guitar without having to spend thousands of dollars.
In the body shape, I like dreadnoughts but I play a combination of strumming at my church and finger style when I'm not there. So a Jumbo or a Grand Concert are great for me.

What guitar do you guys recommend? Or is it impossible to get that for my budget?

Sorry for my english, I'm german.
Last edited by racsolx5 at Feb 20, 2015,
#2
Well, what you're calling "the lower frets", I think are what we tend to call the "upper frets" (*), but your English is basically fine.

Epiphone has what they call a "Masterbilt" series, which is all solid, well received, and well within your price range. I know they have an EA cutaway dreadnought in the line.

I'm told, "Recording King", also has all solid guitars which are fairly priced and well thought of. These would be in your price range as well.


(*) "Upper frets", as in higher up the neck, as well as the musical scale.

Do you guys still have an "H" (Tonic 8va), in your musical alphabet?
#3
Quote by Captaincranky
Well, what you're calling "the lower frets", I think are what we tend to call the "upper frets" (*), but your English is basically fine.

Epiphone has what they call a "Masterbilt" series, which is all solid, well received, and well within your price range. I know they have an EA cutaway dreadnought in the line.

I'm told, "Recording King", also has all solid guitars which are fairly priced and well thought of. These would be in your price range as well.


(*) "Upper frets", as in higher up the neck, as well as the musical scale.

Do you guys still have an "H" (Tonic 8va), in your musical alphabet?


As far as I'm concerned, the cutaway is made so you can play more comfortably on the lower frets, correct me if I'm wrong are the ones on the end.



The cut on the guitar is made so you can play those frets, with a non-cutaway guitar is almost impossible to play on those frets.

As for the guitar, I already own an Epiphone, an AJ-220sce, which cost me around $300 dollars, I love everything about this guitar, however, I don't like the looks of the masterbilt, my father had one and he sold it, I know its stupid, but I do care about the looks
#4
What do you guys think about the Martin GPCPA5K, I love the looks on this guitar but it is laminated wood, what do you think about laminated woods?
#5
Your English is fine.

First off, don't confine yourself to all-solid guitars in that price range. - You might well get a guitar that is better in all sort of ways (tone, construction, value-for-money) by going for laminated back and sides. My favourite guitar for fingerpicking is all-laminate, and my #2 guitar for slide is laminate b&s. The Martin GPCPA5K is HPL, a synthetic, not laminate in the timber sense, but it works fine as an acoustic material.

The wood necks are mahogany, just the fretboard is rosewood. I agree that stratabond looks pretty ugly, but I'm sure it serves its purpose well.

My first choice in that sort of price range would be something like the Taylor 100 series, made in Mexico. They have laminate b&s, and the neck is bolt-on, so are very easily reset, and that is a big plus for me. Sure, satin finishes go shiny, but so what?. You can always buff up the whole thing if it aggregates you.

The value of the cutaway depends on your playing style, I prefer one, but it isn't a deal breaker for me.
#6
Quote by racsolx5
As far as I'm concerned, the cutaway is made so you can play more comfortably on the lower frets, correct me if I'm wrong are the ones on the end.
Perhaps it's cultural difference, but the frets with the highest musical notes are the, "upper frets", which corresponds nicely with the concept of, "upper registers", as in higher pitched notes. For example, you, (or at least I), wouldn't call the e-1 and B-2 strings, "the lower strings", simply because they're closer to the floor. They're high in pitch, so they're, "the high strings".

Quote by racsolx5
The cut on the guitar is made so you can play those frets, with a non-cutaway guitar is almost impossible to play on those frets.
Being the semi-proud owner of 8 guitars with cutaways, I'm familiar with the concept.

Quote by racsolx5
As for the guitar, I already own an Epiphone, an AJ-220sce, which cost me around $300 dollars, I love everything about this guitar, however, I don't like the looks of the masterbilt, my father had one and he sold it, I know its stupid, but I do care about the looks
Yeah, Gibson's Americana looks aren't for everyone. Moving past that, you turn most guitars upside down, they all look alike. A bunch of more refined bling, and all solid wood, kinda happens above the price point you've stated.

I don't like Martin guitars period. Not because they're anything wrong with them, I'm simply tired of hearing about them..

As far as guitars with laminate back & sides go, there's good and bad in the range of laminates running around in the wild. That takes us to the point where you have to do the leg work and listening, to find out what appeals to your sense of hearing.

A solid top is crucial to the sound, the B & S, laminate or solid, have an effect, it isn't quite as prominent. So, I expect there are poor all solid guitars,as well as great laminated guitars, as long as it's confined to the B & S.

Oddly,the new Epiphone, "Inspired by 1964 Texan", (yes that's its real name), is solid top and back, with only laminate sides. It's getting rave reviews, but there's no cut, so I expect it wouldn't be for you.

Did you check out the Recording King line yet?

EDIT: One additional thought here. Shiny finishes go dull, (in spots), and satin finishes go shiny, (in spots). I figure in about a decade, they'll meet in the middle.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 20, 2015,
#9
I see lots of endorsements on here for Recording King so I don't doubt their quality for the price. However, looking at their line, I only see a couple with cutouts and they are smaller sized guitars(smaller than a dread). As far as looks go, I see they have tortoise binding which give some pizazz but other than that they are as plain as it gets. I realize that looks should be the least important factor in choosing a guitar but it still is a factor. Would it kill them to add a little shape to the headstock, bridge or pickguard? Here's a real crazy idea, since the name is Recording "King", how about little crowns for fret markers? Sounds frivilous but I'll bet it sells more guitars.
#10
Check out Faith guitars, they're around your price range, are all solid, have a nice range of tonewoods and shapes that seem to fit your criteria, and most models have coated tops, only the naked series is a satin top. I've heard good things about them, and they sound nice to me, though I've heard the cheaper models aren't spectacular.
#11
What about the martin drs-2?
The Yamaha A3M also looks like a great deal but I can't find any reviews
#12
Quote by rohash
Would it kill them to add a little shape to the headstock, bridge or pickguard?
Actually it might. I think their headstocks are going for the "Martin lawsuit look".
Quote by rohash
Here's a real crazy idea, since the name is Recording "King", how about little crowns for fret markers? Sounds frivilous but I'll bet it sells more guitars.
Why didn't Gibson ever think of that for their J-200?