#1
Hello iam playing electric guitar for half year and iam wondering why are pentatonic scales so important will it be easier to play solos or what. What will be result and be concrete
#2
all scales are importants, but the Minor Pantathonic is probably the most used ever.

You will see traces of it in many solos.

Add the natural minor, major and a couples of arpegios and you have what most solos are built with.
#3
The standard pentatonic scales (major and minor) contain the 5 most harmonically stable notes in any key. Essentially what this means is that you can play notes from them over the appropriate key and in almost all situations any of them will sound good. They're the easiest sets of notes for beginners to get using and sound good because there aren't many notes to think about and they all sound great most of the time.

Also interesting is something like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ne6tB2KiZuk

I don't know exactly how much value there is in a demonstration of the kind of people who would go see Bobby McFerrin live... but it's interesting none the less.
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#4
The minor pentatonic has the interesting property that you can play it over both major and minor chords. Eg, Em pent can sound good over both Em and E major chords. I have found the major pents less widely applicable and more difficult to use effectively, though in some major sounding melodies switching between major and minor pents adds interest and tension. Eg, I play "CC Rider" in A major. and switch between the E major and Em pents when playing the instrumental break.

I also use the pentatonic scale as the skeleton for adding other notes to make other kinds of scales, like blues and diatonics.
#5
The pentatonics helps you to learn faster solos because they have all a part that had been built in. However, quit improvising or build your future solos with the pentatonics as soon as possible. The pentatonics are easy but that don't makes all. The best solos are famous for their licks, backtracks and patterns which are thoughtful. There are so many people who crossed the whole pentatonic scale it's so known, and become so boring. Don't just throw notes from a scale, create or learn tens of licks in order to sound great and soulful.
Last edited by Noxrad at Feb 23, 2015,
#6
I am just learning the the guitar myself and my instructor seems to have presented my curriculum based on the minor pentatonic scale. I am finding it interesting for a number of reasons:
-It is simple. A minor in pattern 3 is in a nice sweet spot on the guitar and you can go up and down without complicated dexterity.
-The boxes. Simple movements up and down the neck can keep you in regions that allow you to maintain a two fret stretch with the first and third finger. These boxes sound good and are easy to play as a beginner
-It seems to be a good building block for learning more complicated theory and scales. The concepts of the pentatonic scale are easier to learn and to see how the whole fretboard is related. I anticipate it will be easier to learn the more complicated stuff having first mastered the pentatonics.