#1
Hello,

im looking for someone to teach me some melodic guitar chords that are more melodic in nature. By this I mean going beyond the standard basic chords near the nut, and beyond barre chords.

I guess I'm talking about chords that add some variance or color to normal chords, such as minors and sevenths, and ninths, augmented, minor-7ths, diminished, etc.

Also being able to move the basic near-the-nut chords up the neck in a CAGED like way is another thing that might help in terms of adding melody to chords.

im thinking along the lines of the Blake Mills, Beatles, Elliott smith, Jon Brion, etc.

Any leads greatly appreciated.
#2
Sounds like you're looking for some jazz chords. We also tend to refer to those chords as altered and extended chords. Understanding chord theory would also be a plus in this endeavor.
#3
There are 4 types of chords. 7, 9, 11 and 13. Anything else is just a triad, and there are 4 types of triads, major, minor, diminished and augmented.

Chords are built using a triad stacked on top of a root note.

To build chords you need to first establish a key.

Once you have a key you can build your chords
7 chords = root plus the III
9 chords = root plus the V
11 chords = root plus the VII
and 13 chords = root plus the IX

What I mean by that is a Cmajor7 chord is simply a C root note with an Em triad on to of it. A Cmajor13 chord is C plus a Dm chord.

Now on the guitar we need to play these chords over different strings, so we need a shape that can be universal.

For 7 chords we use the 1st inversion of the stacked triad, for 9 we use no inversion, for 11 we use the 2nd inveresion and for 13 we use the 1st inversion.

What I mean by that is a Cmaj7 is a C plus the Em triad, but the EM is inverted once, spelling GBE instead of EGB, so the whole chord spells CGBE.

There is the formula for every chord built upon the notes present in the major scale. Now, remember what key you are in. Some chords naturally have a flat 9, or a #11. Just remember the key you are in.

You also need to know about tritone substitution, borrowing chords form neighboring keys on the circle of 4ths, and Augmented 6 chords. Basically, a tritone substitution is substituing a dominant 7 chord for another dominant 7 chord a tritone, or flat 5 away. IE G7 and C#7. They share 2/4 notes so its all good in the hood.

Another trick is to use chords from neighboring keys, which is basically what augmented 6 chords do in theory. If you are in Fmajor, go ahead and throw in an Ebmaj7 because in the key of Bb major its ok, and that is a 4th away. IE moonlight sonata uses the neapolitan 6 chord which is Bbfirst inversion, but theory aside it works because it comes from the key of F, one 4th away from C/Am (note the actual key is C#minor but everything makes more sense in the key of C)
#4
^ that is a great post take notes of that TS!

My advice is fairly similar, but use the CAGED system to learn the 5 positions of each of the standard chords, then go to Maj7, Min7 etc etc, then all the 9's, 11's, 13's, 6's.

And understand the use of Sus chords and slash chords too.

After that you can look at chord synonyms which is an interesting way of looking at chords and getting nice progressions.
Bands:
Native State
A Titan, A Deity
Rash L.A

Gear:
PRS P245 Semi Hollow
Suhr Modern Guthrie Spec
Mayones Regius 7 Buckeye Burl
LSL CVS Studio Strat
Fender American Standard Tele
Faith Hi Gloss Venus

Mesa Lonestar Special
Bugera 333
Zilla 2x12 Fatboy
Line 6 PodHD500
#5
Quote by johnbarnesiii
Hello,

im looking for someone to teach me some melodic guitar chords that are more melodic in nature. By this I mean going beyond the standard basic chords near the nut, and beyond barre chords.

I guess I'm talking about chords that add some variance or color to normal chords, such as minors and sevenths, and ninths, augmented, minor-7ths, diminished, etc.

Also being able to move the basic near-the-nut chords up the neck in a CAGED like way is another thing that might help in terms of adding melody to chords.

im thinking along the lines of the Blake Mills, Beatles, Elliott smith, Jon Brion, etc.

Any leads greatly appreciated.


What you're looking for is not chords at all. It is melody, and harmony. You want to learn about the key, and how harmony and melody fits into that.

What makes the chords sound melodic, is that there are basic ordinary boring chords, and a melody layered on top, but they are played together.

It's a little complicated, but what you're looking for is not some elusive secret chords you don't know. It's the network of how stuff works together. A chord on its own isn't much of anything musical. It gets its musicality from the environment it is in. In the key of C a G9 might sound nice, but in Gb it will probably sound like ass.
#6
Quote by Shredx
^ that is a great post take notes of that TS!

My advice is fairly similar, but use the CAGED system to learn the 5 positions of each of the standard chords, then go to Maj7, Min7 etc etc, then all the 9's, 11's, 13's, 6's.

And understand the use of Sus chords and slash chords too.

After that you can look at chord synonyms which is an interesting way of looking at chords and getting nice progressions.

I highly recommend not using the caged system and tuning your guitar to perfect 4ths. It will make everything make more sense. Trust me
#7
Thanks guys for the great info. Now my next question, where to find a teacher in Los Angeles who can teach me this stuff Any leads appreciated.
#8
Quote by johnbarnesiii
Thanks guys for the great info. Now my next question, where to find a teacher in Los Angeles who can teach me this stuff Any leads appreciated.

Just be happy you dont like in mid california like I do. I can teach skype lessons possibly