#1
So I have a lot of musical ideas that I want to not only record, but transfer to tableture as well. I was wondering if there was a program out there that not only worked well as a recording/sound editing software but is also able to transcribe what I am playing. I have guitar pro now but I am terrible with timing and every time i write something itll take a crazy long time to just get a minute or so of music down.

I'm hoping that someone with more experience here can help me out here, point me in the right direction. thanks yall
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#2
Nothing like that exists.
Well nothing that works.

You can try MIDIguitar but it works average with mono signals and goes crazy with chords.
The way of doing what you want is getting a hexaphonic pickup and a good interface, say the boss guitar synth system I don't remember the name of.
Name's Luca.

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#3
Transcribe to sheet music? Yes. Garageband and others. Tabs are tougher because there are 4 different places on the fretboard to play E3 and it cannot know which one you used.

http://www.icreatemagazine.com/tips/tutorial-print-sheet-music-for-your-garageband-tracks/
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
Logic does it (Audio to Score function) and I'm sure most other major DAWs do, but I really doubt it works well. It's not the easiest of things for a program to do, for guitar, though because of all the impurities and additional 'noise' in the signal, versus a relative clean and pure note like a piano.

I've only ever used the function in Logic years ago, though, as a work around for triggering drum samples way back before I had Trigger or Logic had decent drum manipulation stuff. Essentially you could convert the kick drum/snare/toms individual tracks to MIDI fairly accurately as long as your mics were gated or relatively bleed-free, and then use that MIDI data to play samples on another track.
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#6
Quote by Cajundaddy
Transcribe to sheet music? Yes. Garageband and others. Tabs are tougher because there are 4 different places on the fretboard to play E3 and it cannot know which one you used.
TS was talking about converting audio to midi and then midi to tab, and this you posted kinda skips the first part
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Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#7
There is nothing like that right now. To be honest, I personally think that tab is sort of for newbies in a way. No offense to anyone that uses tab, but I find that what is making all of this difficult for you, is your lack of expertise on guitar.

For me, I just record it, and I know I'll be able to ear it out again, but if I ever want to write it down and never forget it, then I just write the key down, and the roman numerals. It's really easy.

If it is solo notes, then it is either really easy to ear out, or I'm gonna do my own thing every time anyway.

When I first started out on guitar I used tab. That was before I knew anything about chord names, chord shapes keys or anything like that.

Once you learn that, a lot of stuff gets a lot easier.

I imagine that your timing thing is that you don't know how the theory of rhythm matches up with your perception of rhythm.

It's a bit tough at first, but you'll learn it. It's not that bad. If you want to do anything music on the computer, that's something you will want to learn, otherwise everything will take forever. Programming music is already slow enough, even once you know what you're doing.

But if it was me, I would go through all that trouble. I'd get reaper, record the music, and then write down the chord names, or roman numerals+key, which I think is best.

in reaper you can split your item at every chord change, and rename your item to the chord name.

It's really fast.

There is no computer or software that does this. You are the computer/software that needs to do it. You need to program yourself to possess the ability.

That's a big part of what being a musician is. It will make you much more powerful at doing whatever it is you want to do.


Just make sure to name everything appropriately, or you'll end up with so much stuff that you have to go through, that it will make you want to just forget about all of it.
#8
There have been unsuccessful attempts over the years to create software that can take an audio file and turn it into a midi file but the only one I know that came close was back about 15 years but it could only do single instrument audio like a piano or single horn etc. Midi is still only reliable way to do it that I know of. Sonor/Cakewalk has a the ability to turn any midi tracks into normal music notation with it's "Staff View" which can be printed.

I agree with fingrpikingood that in my opinion tabs are for those who have yet to develop any good ear training and enough technique to figure it out themselves.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Feb 25, 2015,