#1
I want to learn how to change the key of songs, Im usually going to be going down because I have a deep voice and I need the song to fit. I don't really know any theory I plan on learning some but don't know where to start. Is it possible to just play a song in a Lower tuning? For example if I play a song in drop d could I play it the same in drop c or would I have to change everything? Any tips on transposing or theory would be greatly appreciated thanks!
#2
It would be exactly the same just sound lower. The intervals between the strings are still the same so there would be no difference.
#3
Yes, if you tune your guitar lower playing the same thing would just sound lower. As for transposing, you just have to play every note or chord a semitone down, with the exception that if something uses the low E note or chord you'll have to downtune.
#4
Quote by Ro-may-o
Yes, if you tune your guitar lower playing the same thing would just sound lower. As for transposing, you just have to play every note or chord a semitone down, with the exception that if something uses the low E note or chord you'll have to downtune.

A semitone? If you tune down to drop C and want the pitch to be the same as in drop D, you would need to play the chords a whole step (two frets) higher.

If it was an Eb standard song played in E standard (and you wanted the same pitch), then you would need to play everything a semitone (one fret) lower than the tab says.


But yeah, TS, if you want to transpose a song down, the easiest thing to do would be changing your tuning lower. That way you don't have to change the fingerings. But if you don't want to change the tuning, you just need to move every chord down/up the same amount of frets. For example if your progression was C-F-G-C and you wanted to play it two whole steps lower, you would just move every chord down four frets. If you run out of frets, use another voicing.

For example in this case if the original chord progression was played like this:

e|-0-1-3-3-
B|-1-1-3-1-
G|-0-2-0-0-
D|-2-3-0-2-
A|-3-3-2-3-
E|---1-3---


You couldn't move the chord shapes 4 frets down (without touching the tuning). So what you should do is find another voicing for the chords and move that down 4 frets. Or (an easier way) just move the root of the chord down 4 frets and play the major/minor/whatever chord with the root on that note (in this case all chords are major). When you transpose, the chord quality always stays the same. So C-F-G-C transposed down two whole steps is Ab-Db-Eb-Ab. The chord quality stays the same - major chords stay major and minor chords stay minor. You just change the pitch.

If you don't want to change the voicings and don't want to touch your tuning, use a capo. 4 frets down = 8 frets up. 2 frets down = 10 frets up.
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Feb 24, 2015,
#6
The easy way people do this is with a capo. But it is really easy to do on guitar without one, if you don't only know the cowboy chords. So, if you know your barre chords, it's really easy, even without a capo.

Music theory is easy to get started, if you get started the right way. Easy and powerful. If you stick around here, or subscribe to my YouTube, I'll likely make a real quick and simple video to give you what I think is the best starting point. It will be on piano, but the first guitar lesson I would give anyone would be on piano, if I had the option.