#1
Hello everyone,

I started to learn playing the bass a couple of years ago, and progressed to a point which you will see in the video. I asked a couple of friends to give me their opinion of my playing skills, and all i got was some negative reviews with no real criticism of my techniques.
Eventually i dropped the whole idea out of frustration, but recently i started to get excited again about the idea of playing the bass more professionally and i wanted some opinions first.

Here is a video of my current progress, I recorded it a while back before i stopped and sold my equipment.
http://youtu.be/yY4OGZKHLx4

I would really appreciate the help.
Thanks in advance, and have a nice day.
Yasser
#2
The things I immediately notice:

- You should alternate your plucking fingers
- Your control over the wah is a bit off, you tend to keep the pedal in a spot where it is too thick sounding and it muffles the notes too far, try to keep the pedal depressed a bit more overall
- Dont let your fingers tuck under the fingerboard like at 1:12
- Perhaps keep your thumb a bit more behind the neck

Overall, Im not sure why anyone would consider this a bad recording, its certainly fine for someone who has played only a couple of years. Your tone isnt bad considering the tune being covered, your timing is not consistently awful, and you made it through the piece without too many errors. Do you have any recordings of non-solo pieces?
#3
1. Try playing it slower. When you master it at a slower tempo then go faster.

2. You need to practice alternating your plucking fingers or try using a pick. You want to be able to do both eventually. It looked like you were trying to use four fingers to pluck at the end of the video which is cool if you want to do that, but its not something I would do.

3. Don't use the string above the one you are playing to rest your thumb on. Try resting your thumb on the pickup.

4. Never let your pinky finger go behind the neck. You should try to keep all your fingers as close to the fretboard as possible. Playing slow is the easiest way to improve that.

5. Practice standing up if you ever plan on playing live.

6. Try playing something easier. The fancy stuff will do nothing but hurt your technique in the beginning. leave the wah alone until you have good technique.

Most importantly keep up the good work and don't give up.

http://www.scottsbasslessons.com

^ Go to that web site and listen to Scott.
#4
^

In response to point 3, using the string above as a rest is a recognised technique known as 'floating thumb.' It naturally mutes the string you're anchored on, plus allows you to move along the string, increasing your tone options. It also means your hand shape isn't changing as much when playing. You aren't stretching to the G string, for example, reducing fatigue. Finally, floating thumb players tend to have their wrist straighter, reducing the incidence of carpal tunnel.
Last edited by Deliriumbassist at Feb 25, 2015,
#5
Thanks a lot for the tips they are very helpful, at least now i know where can i improve.

I've tried resting my thumb on the pickup, but it kills my wrist after 10 minutes of playing.
Also, i get some noise from the vibrating open strings (when i leave the strings i'm not playing not muted), which caused me to rest my thumb the way i do, any advice on that?

Thanks again
#6
Quote by yasserhtd
Thanks a lot for the tips they are very helpful, at least now i know where can i improve.

I've tried resting my thumb on the pickup, but it kills my wrist after 10 minutes of playing.
Also, i get some noise from the vibrating open strings (when i leave the strings i'm not playing not muted), which caused me to rest my thumb the way i do, any advice on that?

Thanks again


You can also mute strings with your left hand. And as for resting your thumb on the pickup, your hand isn't used to that position so it will take some practice before your hand stops aching after ten minutes.
No
#7
Quote by Deliriumbassist
^

In response to point 3, using the string above as a rest is a recognised technique known as 'floating thumb.' It naturally mutes the string you're anchored on, plus allows you to move along the string, increasing your tone options. It also means your hand shape isn't changing as much when playing. You aren't stretching to the G string, for example, reducing fatigue. Finally, floating thumb players tend to have their wrist straighter, reducing the incidence of carpal tunnel.


You're right that's more of a personal preference. Some guys like it and some don't. I find that it makes my right hand slower, but I'm sure using the pickup could also slow other people down.
#8
I recommend resting your thumb on the strings and not the pickup as it has a much lower chance of injury.
#9
Quote by Vlasco
I recommend resting your thumb on the strings and not the pickup as it has a much lower chance of injury.

Do explain.
#11
Anything static has a higher risk alongside it being easier to stress things out with the stretches and the bent wrist. It's not like the risk is so high that you should never ever ever do it, but if someone is already floating their thumb I would never recommend starting to use the pickup. There's no real advantage to it and more potential for hurting things.
#12
Quote by Vlasco
Anything static has a higher risk alongside it being easier to stress things out with the stretches and the bent wrist. It's not like the risk is so high that you should never ever ever do it, but if someone is already floating their thumb I would never recommend starting to use the pickup. There's no real advantage to it and more potential for hurting things.


Quote by Deliriumbassist
As I said, floating thumb promotes a straighter wrist, which reduces incidence of CTS.


There's nothing wrong with learning both techniques. Nothing wrong with stretching either. You can't learn to play an instrument well if you don't streach.

People with CTS will get it from anything they do too much of. It's a silly reason to keep yourself from trying new things. I would understand if you already have problems with CTS, but for people who don't it's like never riding in a car because of the risk involved.

Playing bass is not much different than lifting weights. You break your muscles down when you use them. After you have broken them down you gain muscle when you rest them because you are healing. You get stronger when you put your body through stress and properly rest afterwards.
#13
It was better than I expected. You definitely should not have given up!


Most, if not everything, has already been mentioned, but I would just like to reiterate a few points:
1. Work on your right hand technique. Floating thumb is easy with some practice and lets you have more control over your strings.
2. Work on playing with a more natural posture. Your pushing your head down and arching your back over your bass. Try playing standing up, with a strap, and it will feel a lot different and a lot harder. Use proper posture and there will be little difference from sitting and standing depending on your strap height.
3. Work on smoothing out and neatening up your playing. This can be achieved by working with proper form and posture, but also by practicing slowly and then building up speed.

Other than that, rock on brother.
...it was bright as the sun, but with ten times the heat
#14
Quote by OOD SIGMA
There's nothing wrong with learning both techniques. Nothing wrong with stretching either. You can't learn to play an instrument well if you don't streach.

People with CTS will get it from anything they do too much of. It's a silly reason to keep yourself from trying new things. I would understand if you already have problems with CTS, but for people who don't it's like never riding in a car because of the risk involved.

Playing bass is not much different than lifting weights. You break your muscles down when you use them. After you have broken them down you gain muscle when you rest them because you are healing. You get stronger when you put your body through stress and properly rest afterwards.


Your analogy is awful. The risk involved in driving a car can be lessened by driver experience and correct tutoring/ability. Similar to this- you can play a bass with varying degrees of safety through technique. While anchoring on the pickup is a technique that will allow you to 'drive' the bass, floating thumb will allow people to drive it more safely. Increased flexion due to pickup anchoring can be damaging. Your muscles won't develop properly if they're bring starved of blood, and therefore oxygen. You're also opening the door to nerve interference, or pain. If something hurts when you play, you're doing something wrong and have to actively change your technique. It isn't a 'suck up and play through the pain' situation. Pain is there for a reason.
#15
^ I do the "floating thumb" thing when I'm playing on the 3 highest-pitched strings, but I anchor on the pickup for the low E (since there's no string to anchor on for the low E ).

Is that ok? Does the danger you're mentioning come from always anchoring on the pickup even when playing the higher strings?
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#16
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Your analogy is awful. The risk involved in driving a car can be lessened by driver experience and correct tutoring/ability. Similar to this- you can play a bass with varying degrees of safety through technique. While anchoring on the pickup is a technique that will allow you to 'drive' the bass, floating thumb will allow people to drive it more safely. Increased flexion due to pickup anchoring can be damaging. Your muscles won't develop properly if they're bring starved of blood, and therefore oxygen. You're also opening the door to nerve interference, or pain. If something hurts when you play, you're doing something wrong and have to actively change your technique. It isn't a 'suck up and play through the pain' situation. Pain is there for a reason.


When driving a car there are things you can control and things you can not. I was referring to the things you can not control like CTS or a stroke. It doesn't make you seem any smarter by trying to poke holes in a sound analogy. I'm sorry you're not smart enough to understand it.

Nothing about anchoring your thumb on the pick up will cause muscle starvation.

There is a difference between pain and fatigue. I'm assuming you have CTS because you don't know the difference. Everyone has their limits and I never said people shouldn't listen to their bodies.

By your logic I could say running does more damage to your ankles than walking fast so you shouldn't run.

But in reality there's nothing wrong with running just because it makes me tired. It's even safe to run while I'm tired if I stop at the first sign of pain?

I've never experienced pain from playing bass and I always use the pickup. people are different so what works for some might not work for other people.
#17
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ I do the "floating thumb" thing when I'm playing on the 3 highest-pitched strings, but I anchor on the pickup for the low E (since there's no string to anchor on for the low E ).

Is that ok? Does the danger you're mentioning come from always anchoring on the pickup even when playing the higher strings?


No you need to buy a five string and only use the B string to float.
#18
Maybe this article will explain better. Or are you smarter on the subject and more intelligent than the likes of Pino Palladino, and Randall Kurtz, a bass player and chiropractor?

http://www.notreble.com/buzz/2011/05/10/health-fitness-for-the-working-bassist-part-1-basic-technique/

And evidently you weren't smart enough to understand my rebuke of your analogy- I specifically mentioned lessening of risk. There's always things out of your control.
Last edited by Deliriumbassist at Feb 26, 2015,
#19
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Maybe this article will explain better. Or are you smarter on the subject and more intelligent than the likes of Pino Palladino, and Randall Kurtz, a bass player and chiropractor?

http://www.notreble.com/buzz/2011/05/10/health-fitness-for-the-working-bassist-part-1-basic-technique/

And evidently you weren't smart enough to understand my rebuke of your analogy- I specifically mentioned lessening of risk. There's always things out of your control.


I knew you couldn't have had an original thought.

I understand your aguement or who's every argument you took for your own, but you are applying your argument to people at risk for CTS. Normal people without CTS don't fit into your point. I even agreed with your first post because of how helpful it would be to those with unnatural wrist pain. Why do you want to imply that a great technique shouldn't be used because people with handicaps can't do it without pain? Is it because you are ashamed that you are to weak to do it? CTS is not something you should be ashamed of. It's not your fault for having health issues and it surely doesn't make you weak.

I didn't read your link because I didn't want to waste my time. I understand that floating thumb is a better technique for some, but you are not looking at the whole picture if you think using the pickup is something that is a lesser technique. It just doesn't work for you so you think it's wrong.
#20
The idea is that it is less likely to cause you to develop CTS. Another reason for it is that when you place your thumb on the pickup and don't move it, chances are you're pushing into the pickup with your thumb, especially as you get really into a tune, which develops tension. With a floating thumb, even if you push hard into the string, you're at least moving the thumb around periodically and releasing tension as you do so, if even just for a fraction of a second. Injury prevention is more-or-less all about reducing tension - less tension less risk for injury. It's not a good idea to wait until you have CTS to prevent it.
#21
I use floating thumb, but not in any specific interval. On my 6er, I may use the pickup to anchor for the B and E string, or I may choose to anchor on the B to play on the E string. Same with the following higher strings. Whatever is more comfy for me, or faster if Im only playing one or two quick notes on a higher string.

I didn't even notice this until I looked for the purposes of this thread.


Quote by OOD SIGMA


I didn't read your link because I didn't want to waste my time.


How can you disagree with someone if you are refusing to observe their evidence?
...it was bright as the sun, but with ten times the heat
Last edited by c3powil at Feb 26, 2015,
#22
Quote by OOD SIGMA
No you need to buy a five string and only use the B string to float.


LOL

Quote by Deliriumbassist
Or are you smarter on the subject and more intelligent than the likes of Pino Palladino, and Randall Kurtz, a bass player and chiropractor?


Not sure I want to be listening to a chiropractor

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiropractic

"Chiropractic is a form of alternative medicine[1]"

"Many studies of treatments used by chiropractors have been conducted, with conflicting results.[8] Systematic reviews of this research have not found evidence that chiropractic manipulation is effective, with the possible exception of treatment for back pain.[9] A critical evaluation found that collectively, spinal manipulation was ineffective for any condition.[10]"

Etc.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#23
Quote by c3powil
I use floating thumb, but not in any specific interval. On my 6er, I may use the pickup to anchor for the B and E string, or I may choose to anchor on the B to play on the E string. Same with the following higher strings. Whatever is more comfy for me, or faster if Im only playing one or two quick notes on a higher string.

I didn't even notice this until I looked for the purposes of this thread.


How can you disagree with someone if you are refusing to observe their evidence?

Look at the post before this one. Also, just because it's on the Internet doesn't make it evidence. Also, if he needs someone else to argue his point he should be pretending to know what he's talking about.
#24
You played the right notes but there was no rhythm in it. You want it to have the flow and not just play notes after notes. So pay attention to the rhythm. A couple of wrong notes don't really matter but messing up the rhythm does. I know this piece is a bit more "free" when it comes to rhythm, but it still needs to have the flow. So don't stop playing when you make a mistake. Slow it down so that you can play it with a good flow.

To me your right hand technique looked a bit strange.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#25
Quote by OOD SIGMA
Look at the post before this one. Also, just because it's on the Internet doesn't make it evidence. Also, if he needs someone else to argue his point he should be pretending to know what he's talking about.


I'd take a doctor's advice, or chiropractor's, over any post on this forum.
...it was bright as the sun, but with ten times the heat
#26
Quote by c3powil
I'd take a doctor's advice, or chiropractor's, over any post on this forum.

Good for you...
#27
I'd love to know where the hell you got the idea I have CTS. I don't. I don't fancy developing it, though. It can take 10-20 years before poor technique's damage is manifested. I have never said that you should never pickup anchor. All I've ever maintained is that floating your thumb will reduce the risk of developing problems. Not everyone who purely anchors the pickup will get CTS, RSI or tendinitis. If they don't, great. But technique should be looked at, by everyone, because when it comes to your hands and wrists, safe playing is paramount, or you may find 10-20 years down the line, an unsafe or riskier technique may have caught up with you.
#28
I think that one contributing factor to the floating thumb debate can be the size of one's hands. If you happen to suffer from twelve-year-old-girls-hands "syndrome" as I'm aware that a few regulars here do, then the angles which you're going to subject your wrist to in order to reach the higher strings while achoring on the pickup are going to be more extreme. More strings would also be a factor here.

When I first began playing bass, I used to anchor my thumb on the pickup for the first few months of playing. I still have a little bit of video footage from that time knocking around and angle my wrist had to achieve for me to reach the G string just wasn't healthy, as I have very short fingers. I've been using floating thumb for over 5 years now. It's had several benefits for me. It allows my wrist, fingers, and arms to remain in a much more organic and relaxed position while I play. I also found it easier to build up speed, consistency and accuracy while playing.

Quote by Dave_Mc
^ I do the "floating thumb" thing when I'm playing on the 3 highest-pitched strings, but I anchor on the pickup for the low E (since there's no string to anchor on for the low E ).

Is that ok? Does the danger you're mentioning come from always anchoring on the pickup even when playing the higher strings?


This is how I've always done it... on most of the basses I've owned, the gap between the bottom string and the edge of the pick-up has always been pretty similar to the string-spacing.
Spare a Cow
Eat a Vegan
#29
Quote by Deliriumbassist
I'd love to know where the hell you got the idea I have CTS. I don't. I don't fancy developing it, though. It can take 10-20 years before poor technique's damage is manifested. I have never said that you should never pickup anchor. All I've ever maintained is that floating your thumb will reduce the risk of developing problems. Not everyone who purely anchors the pickup will get CTS, RSI or tendinitis. If they don't, great. But technique should be looked at, by everyone, because when it comes to your hands and wrists, safe playing is paramount, or you may find 10-20 years down the line, an unsafe or riskier technique may have caught up with you.


I've already said floating thumb is probably a great idea for some. I also said pickup anchoring is great for others. I've never said technique shouldn't be looked at by everyone. All I've been saying this whole time is floating thumb is good for some and pickup anchoring is good for others. You may not know this but there are people in this world with large man hands. These large man hands make it difficult to increase speed when floating. The size of your hands and paranoia do not set a standard for which technique people should use.

I assume you have CTS because you are clearly not capable of having a thought process that doesn't revolve around it. Step outside of your box every once in a while. Just because you have CTS doesn't mean the whole world is at risk for it.
#30
Quote by OOD SIGMA

I assume you have CTS because you are clearly not capable of having a thought process that doesn't revolve around it. Step outside of your box every once in a while. Just because you have CTS doesn't mean the whole world is at risk for it.


I wasn't going to post in this thread but this just makes no sense. How would having CTS affect someones thought process? I would suggest that not having CTS would also be a good reason to think about it.

If there is medical evidence for something (which there is) then you can not just brush it off and neglect what it says.

The point about getting an idea from someone else is ridiculous. Just because someone said it before me I can't repeat it? Shall we use gravity and the Earth being round as examples?

You made relevant points about different techniques being used by different people but then ruined it.
For weight lifting you do tear muscle tissue to encourage new and more muscle tissue growth but this is not a good analogy for right hand technique.
#31
Quote by JKing138
I wasn't going to post in this thread but this just makes no sense. How would having CTS affect someones thought process? I would suggest that not having CTS would also be a good reason to think about it.

If there is medical evidence for something (which there is) then you can not just brush it off and neglect what it says.

The point about getting an idea from someone else is ridiculous. Just because someone said it before me I can't repeat it? Shall we use gravity and the Earth being round as examples?

You made relevant points about different techniques being used by different people but then ruined it.
For weight lifting you do tear muscle tissue to encourage new and more muscle tissue growth but this is not a good analogy for right hand technique.


Anything someone experiences affects thought process. That's why people have different thoughts. Even me not having CTS affects the way I think about it because I've never experienced it. Im implying that he try walking in other people's shoes. " I would suggest that not having CTS would also be a good reason to think about it" think about what?

What medical evidence? There is medical evidence that most people don't have CTS. Try explaining yourself better. And I can brush off whatever medical evidence I want especially if it's on the Internet.

It's fine to get an idea from someone, but its sad when you have to provid a link because you are not capable of explaining your point. That's obviously my opinion and not a very important one.

The weight lifting analogy is more scientific than analogy. Just because a muscle is smaller doesn't mean it breaks down any differently than larger muscles.
#32
Quote by OOD SIGMA
Anything someone experiences affects thought process. That's why people have different thoughts. Even me not having CTS affects the way I think about it because I've never experienced it. Im implying that he try walking in other people's shoes. " I would suggest that not having CTS would also be a good reason to think about it" think about what?

What medical evidence? There is medical evidence that most people don't have CTS. Try explaining yourself better. And I can brush off whatever medical evidence I want especially if it's on the Internet.

It's fine to get an idea from someone, but its sad when you have to provid a link because you are not capable of explaining your point. That's obviously my opinion and not a very important one.

The weight lifting analogy is more scientific than analogy. Just because a muscle is smaller doesn't mean it breaks down any differently than larger muscles.



To think about CTS and more specifically, how to avoid getting it. It may not be a common thought but it should still be something to consider.
The medical evidence I am referring to being the causes of CTS, many instructional videos mention the risks through improper technique. It absolutely depends on the individual and his abilities (hand size and stretch) as to the extent of the possible risk. If an individual decides that is how they wish to play, then fair enough, so long as they have been informed.
I was also speaking in generalities for the medical evidence, of course there is not medical evidence that most people don't have CTS. It is not my explanation that is lacking it is rather your will to see any valid point in my explanation.

For the point about providing links. It is possible to know something but not know why. Providing a link shows the source of the information and possibly further information. I acknowledge that there is a lot of bogus information online but there is also many credible websites. I accept that is your opinion though as you mentioned.

You are correct, a small muscle develops in the same way that a large muscle does. So after playing for long periods you would experience fatigue, just as you would after training in the gym. However CTS is linked to the tendons in the hand and not the muscles and any damage to these tendons (through poor technique or otherwise) would cause pain and not fatigue. The pain may not be CTS but pain usually is a sign that something is not right. If you were lifting weights and you felt pain then there is the possibility that you may have torn a muscle or torn a ligament, for example.
#33
Technique-wise not too bad. If you find one finger playing easier for the majority then that's not a problem, James Jamerson only ever used one finger.

The main thing for me would be to relax. It's easy to tense up but it affects your playing making you sound a little choppy and you play harder when tensed so it doesn't sound as even or smooth.

When using a wah, generally, keep it moving even if it's slowly so you don't just get the occasional 'wah' in parts. Check out some videos on wah use, there should be loads for that track on youtube.

Just keep practising, remember it's meant to be fun, don't get too self critical. Playing with other people is a much better way to improve. Find some people and have a few jam sessions, no pressure, just playing.
#34
Quote by JKing138
[ As I've said before, it depends on the person. It seems we agree about that. ][You call that an explanation. It was single sentence statement. BIG difference. ][ Good point about the weight lifting. As I Mentioned earlier, you should stop at the first sign of pain. Regardless of what causes the pain if there is pain something is not working right. ]



I have responded within your quote.

It seems we agree more than we disagree. My only beef is that you consider a very common and useful technique "improper". I understand that people should try to avoid CTS, but many people's fingers (mine included) are long enough to reach every string without bending the wrist at all. I have no problem with other people using floating thumb. My original post advised against it because I have personally been at a disadvantage while using it. That could be bad advice, but it could also be good advice depending on the person. You and dilierumbassist can hate my analogies and opinions all you want, but it doesn't change the fact that some people can anchor on the pickup without complications.
#35
Quote by c3powil
I'd take a doctor's advice, or chiropractor's, over any post on this forum.


I'd take a doctor's advice, but you're aware chiropractic is basically pseudo-science, right? They believe that basically all illness is caused by the spine being out of whack.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiropractic#Controversy

"Throughout its history chiropractic has been the subject of internal and external controversy and criticism.[3][215] According to Daniel D. Palmer, the founder of chiropractic, subluxation is the sole cause of disease and manipulation is the cure for all diseases of the human race.[9][43] A 2003 profession-wide survey[40] found "most chiropractors (whether "straights" or "mixers") still hold views of Innate and of the cause and cure of disease (not just back pain) consistent with those of the Palmers."[216] A critical evaluation stated "Chiropractic is rooted in mystical concepts. This led to an internal conflict within the chiropractic profession, which continues today."[9] Chiropractors, including D.D. Palmer, were jailed for practicing medicine without a license.[9] For most of its existence, chiropractic has battled with mainstream medicine, sustained by antiscientific and pseudoscientific ideas such as subluxation.[39] Collectively, systematic reviews has not demonstrated that spinal manipulation, the main treatment method employed by chiropractors, is effective for any medical condition, with the possible exception of treatment for back pain.[9]" [My bolding]

Sounds legit. You don't need antibiotics, just let me pummel on your back a bit!



A lot of guys on the various forums here have science degrees. I'd certainly take their word over a chiropractor's.

Quote by Ziphoblat

This is how I've always done it... on most of the basses I've owned, the gap between the bottom string and the edge of the pick-up has always been pretty similar to the string-spacing.


Thanks. Yeah it seems the sensible way. When I started out I just anchored on the pickup but then pretty soon I saw people playing (on youtube vids etc.) moving to anchor on the next-lowest string (or maybe I read it in an instructional book) and it seemed like a good idea, as it seemed to help with muting etc. I sort of deliberately tried to cultivate the ability to do it... it took a week or two but now I can do it reasonably well, and I'm not sure I can go back to the old anchoring way I only really anchor now if I have to play, say, one note on a higher string but where the vast majority is on a lower string, where it's inefficient to move my thumb.


Just to clarify, I'm not advocating anchoring or anything like that. As I said, I use the floating thumb method too (I'm no bassist ) as it seems to help with muting, and also seems to put less strain on the wrist etc.

Just I don't have much time for alternative medcines or pseudo-science. Anchoring might be wrong, but if it is it's not because of chiropractic.

EDIT: Just to clarify, in case a chiropractor tries to sue me, all of my posts in this thread are "in my opinion".
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Feb 27, 2015,
#36
Quote by OOD SIGMA
Im implying try walking in other people's shoes.


Always a good idea to walk the mile in another persons shoes
That way, when you do judge or criticize them, you're a mile away... and you have their shoes!

OP, find a good teacher.

FWIW, I've been resting my thumb on the FB and PU since 1969; good, ergonomic technique goes a long way.
#37
Quote by OOD SIGMA
I have responded within your quote.

It seems we agree more than we disagree. My only beef is that you consider a very common and useful technique "improper". I understand that people should try to avoid CTS, but many people's fingers (mine included) are long enough to reach every string without bending the wrist at all. I have no problem with other people using floating thumb. My original post advised against it because I have personally been at a disadvantage while using it. That could be bad advice, but it could also be good advice depending on the person. You and dilierumbassist can hate my analogies and opinions all you want, but it doesn't change the fact that some people can anchor on the pickup without complications.


I anchor on a thumb rest above the pick up, for me the top of the pick up is too close to properly play the E and A strings comfortably. I never said that the anchoring technique was improper, it was a general statement towards improper technique.
For me in the video he appeared tense and this leads to poor technique and possibly injury.
Unfortunately, scientifically or metaphorically, your analogy just doesn't quite hit the mark.
We do seem to agree more then disagree, I have no problem with your opinions, they are yours and you are entitled to them. The way I perceived your posts was that your opinion was the one that mattered over others and was a little aggressive in it's defence.
#38
Quote by JKing138
I anchor on a thumb rest above the pick up, for me the top of the pick up is too close to properly play the E and A strings comfortably. I never said that the anchoring technique was improper, it was a general statement towards improper technique.
For me in the video he appeared tense and this leads to poor technique and possibly injury.
Unfortunately, scientifically or metaphorically, your analogy just doesn't quite hit the mark.
We do seem to agree more then disagree, I have no problem with your opinions, they are yours and you are entitled to them. The way I perceived your posts was that your opinion was the one that mattered over others and was a little aggressive in it's defence.


My analogy was never intended to apply to people bending in positions that are beyond physical limit, but physical limit applies person to person.

I was messing around today and I realized that if I alterd the height of my bass, it can be more or less difficult to use certain techniques. It seems the variables may be endless.

My opinion is the one that matters, but only to me LOL. I never intended to make it seem like my opinion is better than anyone else's. I'm not very good at being graceful online.

I don't think you like the way I delivered my argument , but I'm confident that we have found common ground.