#1
When using scales over chords c,d,e for example, do I stay in the first scale shape on the 8th fret? Or do I have to move the same position to the root note of the chord that's being played? So 8th, 10th,12th?

Thanks in advance
Last edited by gravyYelp at Feb 25, 2015,
#2
if it's in a key you can pretty much use the scale of the key (e.g. if the chord progression is in E you use the E major scale throughout).
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#3
Thanks for the reply.

Is it possible to use the major scale and use the pentatonic as long as you land on the root notes and use them as anchor points?
#4
The pentatonic basically overlays what is known as the minor scale. the minor scale IS the major scale, just starting on the 6th note of the major scale.

it is possible to use any of the 7 modes of the major scale, and a couple other scales that u can worry about later, over those chords. if for example you are playing Cmajor, D Major, E minor, you could be in the key of G. so if you play the Major scale with root on the G, youre ""IN KEY"" and if you play the Pentatonic starting on the E, your ""IN KEY"" if you play the Mixolydian scale starting on the Low E string starting on the 10th fret ( D NOTE), your ""IN KEY"" the D note, is the 5th note in the G Major scale, and also the D major chord, is the 5th chord in the chord progression in the key of G Major. Generally the progression of chords goes, Major, minor, minor, Major, Major, minor, diminished, Root Major. the progression follows the same pattern as the major scale

so Root. Whole step, Whole Step, Half Step, WHole STep, Whole Step, Whole Step, Half Step.

In the G Major it would be. G Major, A minor, B minor, C Major, D Major, E minor, f# diminished,

these are what people are talking about when they say the 4th, and the 5th, or the 1, or the 2, and the 5, and the 6, etc, theyre refering to the order in which the chord or note would be in the major scale of a given key
#5
Quote by gravyYelp
Thanks for the reply.

Is it possible to use the major scale and use the pentatonic as long as you land on the root notes and use them as anchor points?


do you mean the major or minor pentatonic?
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#6
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#7
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#8
Thanks very much for the replies. Thanks guitarjohn99.

Basically, I'm confused with how scale patterns differ and how to play in key.

I can widdle away in minor pentatonic over a chord progression all day long and solo over changes that sound cool by landing on root notes etc. Pretty standard stuff - I've hit a brick wall with my playing now and would like to properly understand modes and how to use them.

I've read a few lessons online and on this site, I'm just struggling to grasp the concept of modes.

Does anyone have any good tutorials online that might help?

Many thanks
#9
I'm not sure you need modes to understand playing over changes? If you just make sure you hit a chord tone (e.g. if you're playing over a C major chord, you can land on either C, E or G (root, major third and fifth respectively) and sound good) it should sound "right" when improvising.

Musician Talk might be a better forum for music theory-related questions (I don't mean that to be pedantic, I don't care less which forum you post in, just the music theory buffs post in there and might not see your thread in here). But be aware they don't tend to like questions about modes in there. There's a sticky at the top of their forum about modes, might be worth a look.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Feb 28, 2015,
#10
This is a big area. Really you should get a teacher to explain and guide you through all of this. Apart from the theory side of things, you still need to learn how to use the scales well in the context of the chords.
#11
Let me mention that a possible problem with obsessing over which scale to play over which chord is the tendency to sound like you are doing exercises rather than playing music.

I once listened to a young jazz guitarist who had just graduated from Berklee, and that was his problem... He played a nice little scalar run for each change the band made, and it was dreadful.