#1
Last week I made an impulse buy!

After a couple weeks in and out of my local music store for guitar lessons, and eye balling the Sherwood Green CV-50 Squier Strat that they had in; and after playing it a number of times (being generally surprised by how nice this thing looked and felt)...I pulled the trigger and bought it. I have an Epiphone LP-100 and a PRS Singlecut SE, so this was a different animal and I am just getting used to the differences in feel and sound.

I am happy with everything and recognize that it is a budget guitar with an old school flare (which may have some performance nuances). But a couple things keep popping up that I may want to address.

First, I don't know how, when to use the tremolo, and don't want to complicate my learning curve by adding a new technique. So I really don't anticipate using it. Should I enhance the tuning stability by disabling the tremolo?

Secondly, I notice that the saddles are flat across and the strings float between the height adjustment set screws. In some cases, they get stuck in the screw hole. Is this bad? Undesirable? Should I be concerned?

With these two issue combined, I considered that I might want to replace the bridge with something different. Am I over thinking this? Should I just shut up and play?
#2
Yeah man, if it's intonated well you're over thinking it.

If your worried about technique, spin the screws tight and lock the bridge down. One day when your comfortable you'll loosen it up and rock the floating bridge. Besides, with a locked bridge you can still dive, and it's easier to tune.
1981 Gibson Les Paul Custom (Black Beauty)
1980 Marshall JMP 2204
#3
So..."locking it up" was one of the options that I was thinking. When you say spin the screws tight, are you referring to the 6 screws on the top side? Will that help with tuning stability? I haven't checked intonation yet, and have only played it for a limited amount of time. The strings may still may be stretch a bit. I have noticed that it has fallen out of tune while playing a bit, but I don't want to over react to that on such a new guitar.
#4
If you want to do that, you screw in the long spring tension-adjusting screws found in the trem spring cavity on the back of the guitar until spring tension pulls the trem bridge hard against the guitar. There shouldn't be any need to alter the trem screws themselves.

I prefer to put a block of wood between the trem block and the back of the trem block cavity, and remove the trem springs and claw completely. There may be an earthing wire connected to the spring claw. If there is, just reconnect it to the trem block. It won't solder, so I just wedge it into one of the spring-mounting holes with a screw or dowel
#5
Quote by Tony Done
If you want to do that, you screw in the long spring tension-adjusting screws found in the trem spring cavity on the back of the guitar until spring tension pulls the trem bridge hard against the guitar. There shouldn't be any need to alter the trem screws themselves.

I prefer to put a block of wood between the trem block and the back of the trem block cavity, and remove the trem springs and claw completely. There may be an earthing wire connected to the spring claw. If there is, just reconnect it to the trem block. It won't solder, so I just wedge it into one of the spring-mounting holes with a screw or dowel


This is the method I was considering. Also, since I posted this, I watched a You tube video where the reviewer of the CV guitar pointed out that the Trem-Bridge on these guitars is not really any good for tremolo and is more for looks or the vintage appeal. If that is indeed the case with these bridges, I would not feel bad about blocking it or upgrading it.
#6
When buying strats the presence or absence of a Fender-style trem isn't a weighting factor in the choice for me, because I always hardtail them anyway. I prefer the wood block method because, although some claim that the springs contribute to tone through their vibrations, I think that they might have a damping effect on sustain.
#7
Are the saddles anything to be concerned about? It just caught me as odd that the high E and B seem to be able to get caught in the bevel around the screw hole rather easily.
#8
You could also adjust the tremolo right and keep the arm in a safe place.

If it has 6 screws in the tremolo leave the 4 in the middle loose and the 2 out screws tight.

Use Fender bullet strings your preference. They fit the tremolo blok compared to ball end strings and keep the tuning.

The springs in the back goes straight! I use 2 to outer and 1 in the middle. All going straight to trem claw not crossed!

Lastly change the string guide/tree on the headstock to US standard.

That is the Secrets behind my Strat and why it stays in tune very well. It is all in the setup. Learn and apply.
Last edited by anders.jorgense at Feb 26, 2015,
#9
More good knowledge.

I blocked it last night, and lubed the nut with a little pencil.

The tremolo was clearly not set up very well to begin with, but I really do prefer removing that variable until I feel the need to use it. The trees might be the only thing I buy for this guitar, which I am really enjoying playing.