#1
Hey guys. I'm changing the strings on my Gibson Les Paul. This is my first time doing it with this instrument and I'm using Ernie Ball 46's. When I strung the low E string through, I wound it until it was tuned, but the string itself has not wound itself around the tuning peg; it is very taught, but only made about about half a rotation. It is the exact same with the A and D strings. I haven't cut the excess string yet, so can someone tell me if this is ok or if I need to start over and use a different technique?
#2
You're going to want at least one full rotation or so the string can't slip out at all, unless you have locking tuners.. What I do when restringing is I pull the string completely taught from the bridge to the tuning machines, then I pull the string from the nut back to the first fret. That usually gives me enough slack to get one and a half to two winds around the peg.
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#3
I put my hand straight out over the 5th fret, looking like I'm doing a karate chop on the fretboard, then I pull the string over my hand like that. I find that usually gives enough slack so that the string has a good few wraps once it's pulled taut.
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#4
Only a half turn might have a tendency to slip, but if it's already done it's a little difficult to go back and start over. Try it and see, I think you'll probably have tuning problems. I don't know of any way to fix it except a new string to replace that one.

I cut mine 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 inch longer than the tuner post, that usually gives me 1 1/2 to 2 turns around the post, in 20 years of stringing that way I've only had a couple of high E and B strings slip. Never have any tuning problems.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#5
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=602241

look at the diagram in post 2. that is what i do and i never have tuning problems. wrap and stick it through, easy and fast.
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#6
I don't remember the link, but this is what I do, and I end up with like 3 full wraps on the low strings, and the equivalent on the high strings:
Pull the string semi taught, after securing it in the bridge, three fingers past the tuning peg. Then press your thumbnail into that spot on the string and put a 90 degree bend in the string. That gives the right amount of slack to get 3 to 4 rotations. I use 4 fingers for the high strings. Wind the strings on carefully. No loose bits or overlapping.
Do this, then stretch the strings and retune them repeatedly until they won't stretch anymore.
This is one of those things I wish I knew 20 years ago, but I just recently started doing it this way, and my guitar stays in tune. I would get another E string, or a set, whatever. This is important to learn. You will benefit immensely learning on an instrument that isn't going out of tune as you're playing.
The three fingers gives 3 wraps on E, 4 on A, 5 on D, so on. I just looked, it's perfect.
Last edited by rickyvanh at Feb 25, 2015,
#7
Quote by rickyvanh
I
    don't remember the link, but this is what I do, and I end up with like 3 full wraps on the low strings, and the equivalent on the high strings:
    Pull the string semi taught, after securing it in the bridge, three fingers past the tuning peg. Then press your thumbnail into that spot on the string and put a 90 degree bend in the string. That gives the right amount of slack to get 3 to 4 rotations. I use 4 fingers for the high strings. Wind the strings on carefully. No loose bits or overlapping.
    Do this, then stretch the strings and retune them repeatedly until they won't stretch anymore.
    This is one of those things I wish I knew 20 years ago, but I just recently started doing it this way, and my guitar stays in tune. I would get another E string, or a set, whatever. This is important to learn. You will benefit immensely learning on an instrument that isn't going out of tune as you're playing.
    The three fingers gives 3 wraps on E, 4 on A, 5 on D, so on. I just looked, it's perfect.

    That is the way i put my strings in my guitar. I learned that from a video of a guitar tech on YouTube:

    http://youtu.be/zGLMy6DbpBc
    #8
    Right on Silent Jay, that's the one I got it from. I also invested in an electric winder. This guys method works for me.
    #10
    Ditto on the three fingers and bend method above from rickyvanh above. I saw the same video a few years ago and have done it that way ever since. Never had a problem at all. After 40 years of playing I finally have the one simple and effective way to put strings on that won't slip.
    Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
    #11
    Not only do you want to have two or three extra wraps on the tuner post, but ideally you want to have the string lock itself down. One of the methods of doing this to have at least one of the winds pass over the string after it comes through the hole in the tuner post.