#1
I'm looking for a great 5 strings bass to play Groove Metal/ Metalcore (Pantera, Lamb of God, Megadeth). I'm looking for a longtime relationship, so I know I will also play classic Rock as well. I like basses with thin neck and active pickups. My budget is 400$-700$ US. I was thinking about a Jackson Ellefson or a JS3V, a G&L Tribute but wich one L or M series, maybe Fender ? Please help...
#3
I'm also biased toward my Schecters, although I don't yet own a Schecter bass, but I play this one all the time at the store I work in, and holy balls it's a wonderful bass for absolutely anything rocking or heavy.

http://schecterguitars.com/bass/stiletto-custom/stiletto-custom-5-194-195-detail
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#4
I own a Ibanez SR255 and really enjoy it... Ibanez have really thin neck... They are great basses.

About Schecter, I never played them but I Will sure try.. Thanks
#6
Five string basses are usually used in metal to compensate for the double bass and the drop-tuned (standard tuned guitars also at times) guitars, mostly the fifth string is for the extra lower end to compensate for the drop-tunings!!!! If I could recommend something, please get an Esp Ltd B-204SM bass, it a four-string, but i usually think five-strings are unnecessary for anything else other that the extra lower punch. Drop-tuning a four string is just the same as having a five-string.
#7
There are no specific 5-string basses for metal. Any one will do.
I have a Carvin LB-75 5-string with active pickups.

It includes a "deep" switch (which I don't use or need) for the neck pickup and a "bright" switch (which I don't use or need) for the bridge pickup. The active controls are more than enough boost and cut.
#8
Genre specific basses always seem rather, I don't know, constrictive. Go for a bass that has the sound you want and feels "playable" in your hands. Then make it work for what you want to do musically.

My two cents/pence on the matter.
#9
Quote by griffindor1944
Drop-tuning a four string is just the same as having a five-string.


Not really. Most fivers have a longer scale length than the four string version of the same thing, and the extra length helps the lower tuned strings sound beefy. There are also additional chord shapes that you only get with a five string. And it lets you get lower without sacrificing your high range. And a lot of players like to have the 5th string there, even when not using it, as a thumb rest. Plus, even when you're not using the extra low range, you can still use the extra string, higher on the fretboard, to hit notes you would otherwise have to move to the low end of the E string for, allowing you to keep your hand higher up, for basslines using those high notes.

Basically, every time anybody says anything along the lines of "X number of strings is pointless, Y is all you need", they are wrong. Always. Maybe they don't have any use for extra range or any of the other benefits, but people like that love to tell you that you don't have any use for it, either. And they are wrong.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
Last edited by the_bi99man at Feb 28, 2015,
#10
Quote by the_bi99man
Most fivers have a longer scale length than the four string version of the same thing, and the extra length helps the lower tuned strings sound beefy.


Actually, of all of this, that may be the one thing I'd take issue with. Most of the fours and fives of the same bass I'm experienced with have had the same scale.

Quote by the_bi99man

There are also additional chord shapes that you only get with a five string. And it lets you get lower without sacrificing your high range. And a lot of players like to have the 5th string there, even when not using it, as a thumb rest. Plus, even when you're not using the extra low range, you can still use the extra string, higher on the fretboard, to hit notes you would otherwise have to move to the low end of the E string for, allowing you to keep your hand higher up, for basslines using those high notes.


Yup.
#11
Quote by dspellman
Actually, of all of this, that may be the one thing I'd take issue with. Most of the fours and fives of the same bass I'm experienced with have had the same scale.


Now that I'm thinking of it, I forgot that Fenders are usually 34" for either 4 or 5 strings. I was thinking of the Schecters we have at my store. They go up to 35" on the 5 and 6 stringers. Feels really nice. A noticeably smoother, less rattly low B than the same gauge at 34".
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#12
Quote by the_bi99man
Not really. Most fivers have a longer scale length than the four string version of the same thing.

Some, but definitely not most.

The argument for scale length can go back and forth all over the place, but in all reality your average 34" scale 4 string can tune down just fine. You just need the proper strings and a good set up. Having a 5th string there is just to increase overall range and help to provide a greater economy of motion.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#13
Quote by Tostitos
Some, but definitely not most.

The argument for scale length can go back and forth all over the place, but in all reality your average 34" scale 4 string can tune down just fine. You just need the proper strings and a good set up. Having a 5th string there is just to increase overall range and help to provide a greater economy of motion.


Precisely. Something that people who get all butthurt and defensive over the existence of extended range instruments don't seem to understand.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#14
I NEED a 5 strings bass for what I'm doing... I just want your opinion on what bass should I choose to play Groove Metal and classic rock. A bass that Will last, a thin neck bass , active pickups. Schecter ? G&L ? Music Man ? Ibanez ? Jackson ? Fender ?

Thanks guys !
#15
Fender jazz.
Gear:
EBMM Bongo HS 4
EBMM Sting Ray 5
Eden D410T
Tech 21 Sansamp RBI
Tech 21 Sansamp RPM
Art 341 Dual Channel EQ
QSC GX5 Power Amp
#19
Schecter makes tons of good, affordable 5 stringers, that will last you damn near forever if you treat them right. And don't let anybody tell you how many strings you need.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#20
I played in a prog metal band using a Ibanez Sr605 and it played and sounded excellent for everything i required of it
#21
Ibanez BTB 405 and 455.

Have the nut recut on the 405 to do the F# B E A D thing.

Save money for speaker reconing as the F# make the coils pop out of the frames.
Ibanez BTB 1006 Fretless and 405 (no Barts)
456 & 455(w/Barts)
Genz Benz NeoX400 112T & NeoX 112T cab.
Digitech BP-8 (x2)
Yamaha PB-1
Boss: SYB-5, PS-2, OD-20, EQ-20, PH-3,BF-3, CE-20, DD-20
Morely A/B