#1
So as the title says.
How is it possible that minor and major scales can be the same? I have my own way of "categorising scales" to 6. And 5. String scales meaning the root is either on the 6. Or the 5. String.
Now the question itself. For example the first pattern of the C Minor Pentatonic is the same with the 5th pattern of the C Major pentatonic.. How is that possible? How am I to determine whether I'm using the major or the minor pentatonic for example with the previously mentioned scales?

The second pattern of the C major pentatonic is identical with Minor's third pattern?.. Where the fk is the logic?
Posting with a phone so expect mistypings.
#2
Major and minor scales are related to eachother, but what scale you are playing is determined of the key you are playing in, and what chords you are playing over.

The C major scale contains the notes C, D, E, F,G, A and B. These same notes are contained within the A minor scale. The key determines if it is a major or minor scale, these notes played over a progression that resolves to C will mean it is C major, these same notes played over a progression that resolves to Am will mean it is in A minor. The relative major/minor is always a minor third away. If you play in G, Em is the relative minor. If you play in Bm, D is the relative major.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#3
^ Yeah, and also, the box shape for all scales of the same type is the same. You just start it on a different fret.

For example this is A minor pentatonic:

e|---------------------5-8-
B|-----------------5-8-----
G|-------------5-7---------
D|---------5-7-------------
A|-----5-7-----------------
E|-5-8---------------------

It's a movable pattern so if you move all notes one fret higher, you get the A#/Bb minor pentatonic.

e|---------------------6-9-
B|-----------------6-9-----
G|-------------6-8---------
D|---------6-8-------------
A|-----6-8-----------------
E|-6-9---------------------

This works with all scales.

(And I'm pretty sure you may already know this but I just wanted to make it sure.)
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#4
Quote by Sickz
Major and minor scales are related to eachother, but what scale you are playing is determined of the key you are playing in, and what chords you are playing over.

The C major scale contains the notes C, D, E, F,G, A and B. These same notes are contained within the A minor scale. The key determines if it is a major or minor scale, these notes played over a progression that resolves to C will mean it is C major, these same notes played over a progression that resolves to Am will mean it is in A minor. The relative major/minor is always a minor third away. If you play in G, Em is the relative minor. If you play in Bm, D is the relative major.


What.. Can you clarify and explain this with both C minor and major pentatonic? I'm unable to apply this D:
#5
Quote by Billie_J
What.. Can you clarify and explain this with both C minor and major pentatonic? I'm unable to apply this D:


Alright. So pentatonic scales are a "stripped down" version of the full scale, leaving out the second and sixth degree if we are talking minor pentatonic, and leaving out the fourth and seventh if we are talking about major pentatonic.

So immediately we can say C minor pentatonic = C natural minor scale, and C major pentatonic = C major scale.

If we look at a C minor pentatonic scale, it contains the notes C, Eb, F, G and Bb. If we look at the C major pentatonic it contains the notes C, D, E, G and A. Now what happens if you start a minor pentatonic scale with A as the root instead of C? You get the notes A, C, D, E and G. Sounds familiar? It is the same notes found in the C major pentatonic! This is because major and minor scales (as said earlier, pentatonic scales are stripped down versions of major and minor scales) are related to each other. A minor and C major shares the exact same notes and chords, the difference between if you are playing in major or minor depends on which chord you resolve to. (Which chord feel like home in the tune) Play the notes of C major over a progression that resolves to a C major chord, you are playing in major. Play the exact same notes over a progression that resolves to a A minor chord, you are playing in minor.

Since you mentioned patterns i guess you are more used to playing in patterns that thinking about notes and intervals. Think like this, if you play a C minor pentatonic from the root, the second note of the pentatonic scale is the relative major key, where you can play a major pentatonic and still be in the same key. For example. E minor pentatonic, second note is G. E minor and G major are related. Play a D minor pentatonic, second note is F, D minor and F major are related. Using this we can find the Cm pentatonic and Eb major pentatonic is the same, and that A minor pentatonic and C major pentatonic is the same.

If you are having trouble understanding music theory i would suggest you take a look at Justinguitar or musictheory.net for theory lessons, they would be able to help you more than me. Since i am not sure where your current knowledge level is regarding these concepts.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
Last edited by Sickz at Feb 26, 2015,
#6
^ If you don't know what a progression in C major or A minor sounds like, here are some examples. Try playing C major pentatonic over these progressions and see how the sound changes:

C-F-G-C

Am-Dm-Em-Am

The first is in C major and the scale you are using is C major pentatonic. The second is in A minor and the scale you are using is A minor pentatonic. They are the same notes but they get a different function when played over different chords. You may have heard "major sounds happy, minor sounds sad". That's a stupid generalization but it helps you with understanding the difference between major and minor. The same notes can have the "opposite feelings" depending on the context. That's why we call the same collection of notes with different names - A minor and C major sound different.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
+1.

Allow me to open the can of worms and claim major is sadder.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#8
And umm.. Isn't the first pattern of the C Phrygian the same with F Natural Minor scale? If you play the F NM scale from the same position but you only start from F.
Last edited by Billie_J at Feb 27, 2015,
#9
Quote by Billie_J
And umm.. Isn't the first pattern of the C Phrygian the same with F Natural Minor scale? If you play the F NM scale from the same position but you only start from F.

Yes. But the position you are playing doesn't matter. What matters is the tonic. Everything is related to the tonic. C phrygian is a lot closer to C minor than F minor when it comes to sound.

I would first learn about keys, though. Modes will just confuse you if you don't understand keys properly.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#10
This. Don't get on modes until you can comfortably find and play a major/minor scale in every key and know what a key is and how it works, lest you drown in a sea of misinformation.

Right now your focus should be playing the major or minor scale of whatever key you are in, as well as using the derived pentatonic scale for each key.

Ex: Key of A = A major/A major pent.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp