#1
Hi

If I'm in E minor and I play E F# A B D E what would that be called?
Because if I play A minor pentatonic that can have 5 names technically, one for each degree.

A minor, C Major, D minor, E minor, or G Major.

would E F# A B D E be dominant pentatonic, or does it have several names too

I'm writing out pentatonic shapes and I want to write this one as 'major/minor' so it fits in with the rest of the shapes.
#2
It wouldn't be called anything specific, that is just the natural minor scale in Em without playing the third and sixth degree.

A dominant pentatonic scale is a scale that consists of the following intervals: 1, 3, 4, 5 and b7. Having a major third and a minor seventh creates that sound. So an E dominant scale would outline a E7 chord, and the notes would be E G# A B D.

Remember though that the A minor pentatonic does not technically have those names for it. The A, D and E minor pentatonics and the C, G and F major pentatonics fit into the the C major/A minor scale.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#3
No you crazy kids, its just D major/B minor pentatonic starting on E.

You can play that in E minor (up a 5th) for a slightly extended sound. I do it all the time. So does Eric Johnson and John McLaughlin.

Check my thread on pentatonics, it explains all.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#4
Quote by Jet Penguin
No you crazy kids, its just D major/B minor pentatonic starting on E.

You can play that in E minor (up a 5th) for a slightly extended sound. I do it all the time. So does Eric Johnson and John McLaughlin.

Check my thread on pentatonics, it explains all.


Silly me, i got caught on the fact that he said in E minor and didn't bother to think about it as another pentatonic scale. Good thing to have someone slap you on the hand every now and then.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#5
Well if you want to get all classical and technical, we could claim its the second mode of a D major pentatonic scale (which would actually have an E root), but that is both completely insane and unrelated to this particular usage of pentatonics.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#6
Cool
just I looked at a D dominant pentatonic scale on the web and it has the same notes as in E major so I wasn't sure what it was called.

I worked out all 20 positions of the pentatonic scale in the key of E minor, it uses 2 notes per string and is across all 6 strings per scale, ill attach here it shortly.
Last edited by rocklore at Feb 26, 2015,
#7
Pentatonic scaletone forms
( E F# G A B C D E ) ~ E minor

syntax:

- = next string

F# A C D E F# A C D E F# A       2 5-3 5-2 4-2 5-3 5-2 5
F# A B D E F# A B D E F# A       2 5-2 5-2 4-2 4-3 5-2 5

G A B D E G A B D E G A          3 5-2 5-2 5-2 4-3 5-3 5
G A C D E G A C D E G A          3 5-3 5-2 5-2 5-3 5-3 5

A C D E F# A C D E F# A C        5 8-5 7-4 7-5 7-5 7-5 8
A B D E G A B D E G A B          5 7-5 7-5 7-4 7-5 8-5 7
A C D E G A C D E G A C          5 8-5 7-5 7-5 7-5 8-5 8
A B D E F# A B D E F# A B        5 7-5 7-4 7-4 7-5 7-5 7

B D E G A B D E G A B D          7 10-7 10-7 9-7 9-8 10-7 10
B D E F# A B D E F# A B D        7 10-7 9-7 9-7 9-7 10-7 10

C D E F# A C D E F# A C D        8 10-7 9-7 10-7 9-7 10-8 10
C D E G A C D E G A C D          8 10-7 10-7 10-7 9-8 10-8 10

D E F# A C D E F# A C D E        10 12-9 12-10 12-9 11-10 13-10 12
D E G A B D E G A B D E          10 12-10 12-9 12-9 12-10 12-10 12
D E F# A B D E F# A B D E        10 12-9 12-9 12-9 11-10 12-10 12
D E G A C D E G A C D E          10 12-10 12-10 12-9 12-10 13-10 12

E F# A C D E F# A C D E F#       12 14-12 15-12 14-11 14-13 15-12 14
E G A B D E G A B D E G          12 15-12 14-12 14-12 14-12 15-12 15
E F# A B D E F# A B D E F#       12 14-12 14-12 14-11 14-12 15-12 14
E G A C D E G A C D E G          12 15-12 15-12 14-12 14-13 15-12 15
Last edited by rocklore at Feb 26, 2015,
#8
Dude that's horrifically unnecessary. Most of those are the same scale.

Just learn your major and minor pentatonic in all 12 keys and learn how to apply them/impose them over chord changes.

Less work, relevant results.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#9
There all the same scale technically yet there all different too.
The 5 position system does not use the 2nd or 7th, or in the case or major - the 6th and 3rd.

This 20 pos system is useful for:

- joining up different positions, most people skip/jump between the 5 positions in the 5 pos system.
- learning more fingerings - yes that's important
- working out other sequences or patterns such as 3 note per string or 2-3, useful for getting to the high notes


The 5 position system is very basic.
Last edited by rocklore at Feb 27, 2015,
#10
Never said anything about five positions, I just meant learn them everywhere.

Having 20 different scale forms for pentatonic stuff is unnecessary IMO. Especially when they all behave the same way over changes.

And besides, you don't have twenty positions. You have seven. You have twenty subsets spread out over 7 positions

All you are doing with those 20 different formations is plucking two notes out of E Aeolian in different combinations.

Think of how much easier it would be to just learn the E natural minor scale all over the fretboard, and how to apply that to chord changes than it would be to mentally keep track of TWENTY different subsets of the same scale.

By the time you decide on a subset, locate it, and begin playing it the band will be on the next chord and you'll have to start over!

Look, if you find that it's giving you results, more power to you. But it be easier to fully learn major and minor scales and their derived pentatonics; ESPECIALLY since it would give you the exact same results.

Disclaimer: I just woke up so if I sound like a jerk sorry. Not my intention. Just trying to share some advice on getting the most mileage out of your practice time.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#11
Knowing the E minor scale isn't enough because melody uses larger intervals than what scales are made up of. Therefore it's important to know many positions of a scale , In theory it may sound right but in real life, on the guitar. it doesn't work that way.
I know the E major scale, but I still trip up playing pentatonic(s), I find it hard to know where to move to next on the fret-board.
If you change the key the shapes stay the same, they just move up or down the fret-board, I used E minor as an example.

This isn't that complicated and is definitely learn-able, there's only 5 unique shapes the rest are basically the same. The could be anything but just happens to be the same shape which is important to acknowledge.

Here is the 5 unique positions but easier to read:
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Regards, K
Last edited by rocklore at Mar 1, 2015,
#12
Or you could just work wide-interval playing into your practice routine.

I'm not saying its complicated or unlearnable. I just think it's unnecessary labor.

That being said, I see your points. Consider it agreeing to disagree.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp