#1
So i've been on and off when it comes to guitar playing for about three years now. I played a little, put it down, played a little, put it down, played a little, and then put it down for a very long time (when I say play I mean do simple parts of an intro to a song, nothing too special). But anyways, I've noticed something, and that's that I really suck. I have all the supplies I need (a Peavey 6505+, an ESP LTD MH 1000, another Yamaha acoustic, etc) but seeing that I can't even play a simple riff like Electric Eye by Judas Priest really puts me down and makes me not want to touch it. I know that all beginners suck when they first play, but I suck really bad, and that just makes me lose motivation I have Learn and Master Guitar by Gibson, but sometimes it just bores the living hell out of me. I barely got done with only one DVD out of the whole thing. Once I get bored i'll usually try to hop on the guitar and play something simple from a song I like, but i'll see that I can't even do that and it will just put me down, big time. I mean, i'm not trying to play a Megadeth song where it's very complicated, but you know what I mean.

With that said, when you were a beginner and sucked just as much as me, what did you do to keep playing and motivate yourself to where you are now? I'm really struggling. I really really want to learn, but I guess i'm just very impatient to where I want to be able to play a full Slayer song by the next month (which definitely won't happen).

tl;dr: I suck badly, how do I motivate myself to keep practicing and not give up?
Last edited by Granata at Feb 26, 2015,
#2
Keep at it. Find a teacher or some sort of mentor. Books, DVDs, and YouTube only go so far. Real people can motivate you and give you feedback on your playing. Maybe there's a technique issue there.
Keep trying that one song you really want to play, little by little. You will nail it one day. That's all it will take.
You have to make it fun somehow. You can practice your ass off for 2 hours a day, but if you aren't having fun, it's a waste of time.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#3
Quote by ryanbwags
Keep at it. Find a teacher or some sort of mentor. Books, DVDs, and YouTube only go so far. Real people can motivate you and give you feedback on your playing. Maybe there's a technique issue there.
Keep trying that one song you really want to play, little by little. You will nail it one day. That's all it will take.
You have to make it fun somehow. You can practice your ass off for 2 hours a day, but if you aren't having fun, it's a waste of time.


That's the problem, the DVDs bore me, and I suck. A teacher is out of the question now because I'm A) a college student and B) broke.

Such a shame that I have over 2.5k worth of guitar related stuff and I can't seem to play it.
#4
Honestly it just might not be for you and that is not a bad thing. From experience while I did (and still do!) get frustrated when I couldn't play stuff that I deemed was easy I still enjoyed playing and practicing the song. I guess the only thing motivating me was just that I enjoyed playing and that was enough to keep me going.

I would like to note that when I say "not for you" I don't mean that you can never learn to play guitar well. I mean that you might never enjoy playing the guitar enough to warrant time spent practicing it.
And everything that once was
infinitely far
and unsayable is now
unsayable
and right here in the room.


- Franz Wright
Last edited by NougatOfficial at Feb 26, 2015,
#5
I don't know what else to tell you, man. Find someone to jam with who won't charge you to help you out (a mentor).
That, or find a part time job. Being a student doesn't mean you have to be broke, too. I've been there.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#6
Like he says above, It may just not be your thing. Maybe you should have started smaller gearwise?
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#7
I think a lot of it comes from self motivation, when I got pissed off with it I would be pissed off at myself because I couldn't play it. This would make me keep on practising it over and over again until I got it right. I didn't want to practise, but I didn't want to play it badly either, so the former won out. And once you've cracked the barrier and can play some stuff then it will motivate you to play harder things.

When I started I really wanted to play Pinball Wizard, that was my aim as a guitarist, once I could play that I was happy, but I wasn't able to play that properly until after two years, in those two years I was practising very simple songs and something that I think really helped was looking at grade books, Rockschool were the ones I used, and they had scales and songs for that grade to play along to and learn. I didn't think "oh, I'm practising this technique" or anything I just learnt with the help of a guitar teacher who was a friend of mine and I slowly got there.

If you feel you are passionate about learning to play the guitar then you will find the way, it just takes some people longer to find it than others.
#8
This sounds quite similar to my learning experience, although I never spent quite as much on gear! My most expensive item is my American Strat.

I've had guitars for quite a few years, tried lessons, DVDs, books, but just could never play anything that I really wanted to, and would quite regularly hit a brick wall in terms of progress/motivation.
Just before Christmas, I just so happened to read a random topic about guitars on a mountainbiking forum, and quite a few people recommend Justin Guitar. A quick google, and I've now progressed more in the past 2 months, than I have in the past 10 years!

I've just completed Justin's beginner course, and it's a well balanced mix to get you learning guitar in a structured way. It's the first time I've been truly motivated to pick up my guitar everyday, and I've now gone over 2 months without a single day of not playing my guitar.
Each stage introduces something new, and are backed up with varied song suggestions to apply what you learn, which I think is probably what has motivated me the most.

And the best bit, it's all free!
Yes you can donate, and/or you can buy various books/dvds Justin has produced, which help to support the various courses. I personally bought the Beginner Songbook, as I'm not really one for making endless notes from videos, and it's a brilliant companion to the course.
#9
The only thing that can really motivate you is enjoying playing the guitar. When I sucked, I didn't care. I just played Metallica riffs and was happy with that - I liked the badass riffs I could play and liked the sound of the guitar and that kept me motivated. Today I don't play that much any more. I don't suck but I'm not that great either. Guitar is more like a tool for me - I use it to figure out stuff and record my ideas. Sometimes I just noodle around for fun. And of course play with other people (though most of the time I play the bass in a band). Playing with other people is the meaning of playing an instrument IMO. It's the thing I enjoy most.

Maybe learn some easier songs, start writing your own songs, jam with your friends, try different styles of music, learn a new technique... Learn stuff by ear.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#10
All good suggestions above.

I've also been playing about three years. Try to look at what you can do now that you couldn't a month ago. Recognize that you've made progress, however slow it may seem.

With all of the different things I've learned over the years, it seems that I've reached a point where things started to click, and the learning process seemed to accelerate. I think it's that way for a lot of people.

Set goals for yourself, but not unreasonable ones. Understand that, with some work, you will be able to play Electric Eye, and you'll even move up from there.

One thing I'd suggest is that you not do it for a bit and put it down, then pick up days or weeks or months later. Set aside a certain amount of time each day or every other day for practice. That way, you won't be slipping backwards by taking time off.

I'm still a beginner, so I'm not speaking as an accomplished guitarist. I'm just speaking from my experiences with learning many things.
#11
You either like to play/practice guitar or you don't. It's supposed to be fun.

If you don't like it or it's too frustrating for you then quit.

There are plenty of other things to do in life.
#12
You just need to find a way to enjoy the guitar. You clearly want to play the guitar because otherwise you wouldn't ask this question. I'm sure when you started, you enjoyed it a lot. You just need to find a way to enjoy it again. Maybe you need to change your practicing habits. For example if you don't like technical exercises, just learn songs. You can learn the same things in context or out of context. For some people it gets easier when they can focus 100% on the technique and for some other people that kind of stuff just gets boring.

As I said, I think joining a band or just finding people to jam with would be the best thing to do. Also, write your own music. That kind of gives your playing skills some meaning.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#13
think about all the hot chicks you're gonna get.


but seriously, just try to learn something a little above your skill level, and once you master that, try again. reaching for higher goals did the trick for me. probably that little bit of competitiveness in me
Quote by element4433
One time I watched a dog lick his own dick for twenty minutes.

Quote by Roc8995
No.


Well, technically it could be done, but only in the same way that you could change a cat into a hamburger. It's an unpleasant process, and nobody is happy with the result.
#14
Quote by Virgman
You either like to play/practice guitar or you don't. It's supposed to be fun.

If you don't like it or it's too frustrating for you then quit.

There are plenty of other things to do in life.


This thread is called "How does a beginner motivate himself to not give up?", not "Someone help me give up faster." Either contribute, or don't even bother posting in here.

Quote by ryanbwags
I don't know what else to tell you, man. Find someone to jam with who won't charge you to help you out (a mentor).
That, or find a part time job. Being a student doesn't mean you have to be broke, too. I've been there.


Like I said, a teacher is out of the question for now.

Quote by m_c
This sounds quite similar to my learning experience, although I never spent quite as much on gear! My most expensive item is my American Strat.

I've had guitars for quite a few years, tried lessons, DVDs, books, but just could never play anything that I really wanted to, and would quite regularly hit a brick wall in terms of progress/motivation.
Just before Christmas, I just so happened to read a random topic about guitars on a mountainbiking forum, and quite a few people recommend Justin Guitar. A quick google, and I've now progressed more in the past 2 months, than I have in the past 10 years!

I've just completed Justin's beginner course, and it's a well balanced mix to get you learning guitar in a structured way. It's the first time I've been truly motivated to pick up my guitar everyday, and I've now gone over 2 months without a single day of not playing my guitar.
Each stage introduces something new, and are backed up with varied song suggestions to apply what you learn, which I think is probably what has motivated me the most.

And the best bit, it's all free!
Yes you can donate, and/or you can buy various books/dvds Justin has produced, which help to support the various courses. I personally bought the Beginner Songbook, as I'm not really one for making endless notes from videos, and it's a brilliant companion to the course.


Justin was great. I watched all his beginner videos, but he honestly didn't help much. By the time I finished his beginner course I got sick and tired of chords. All I did was chords, chords, chords. Kinda got fed up with it at one point.

Quote by MaggaraMarine
The only thing that can really motivate you is enjoying playing the guitar. When I sucked, I didn't care. I just played Metallica riffs and was happy with that - I liked the badass riffs I could play and liked the sound of the guitar and that kept me motivated. Today I don't play that much any more. I don't suck but I'm not that great either. Guitar is more like a tool for me - I use it to figure out stuff and record my ideas. Sometimes I just noodle around for fun. And of course play with other people (though most of the time I play the bass in a band). Playing with other people is the meaning of playing an instrument IMO. It's the thing I enjoy most.

Maybe learn some easier songs, start writing your own songs, jam with your friends, try different styles of music, learn a new technique... Learn stuff by ear.


Metallica is great. Only thing I am proud of is that I can play the riff to For Whom The Bell Tolls and a much slower version of that lead part that Kirk does. What sucks is that I don't have anyone to jam to. I have two friends (one plays acoustic and the other drums) who get so damn cocky at times. The acoustic dude only plays chords, which isn't really anything to get cocky about. The drummer has been forcing the acoustic guy and I to learn this stupid song from like the 40s since last August. I gave up on them a long time ago, both friendship and musical wise.

Quote by Monkeyleg
All good suggestions above.

I've also been playing about three years. Try to look at what you can do now that you couldn't a month ago. Recognize that you've made progress, however slow it may seem.

With all of the different things I've learned over the years, it seems that I've reached a point where things started to click, and the learning process seemed to accelerate. I think it's that way for a lot of people.

Set goals for yourself, but not unreasonable ones. Understand that, with some work, you will be able to play Electric Eye, and you'll even move up from there.

One thing I'd suggest is that you not do it for a bit and put it down, then pick up days or weeks or months later. Set aside a certain amount of time each day or every other day for practice. That way, you won't be slipping backwards by taking time off.

I'm still a beginner, so I'm not speaking as an accomplished guitarist. I'm just speaking from my experiences with learning many things.


I have noticed that I pick up on this quickly. I can look at tabs for ten minutes and then play it out of memory without looking at it again, so yes, I can sight read tabs pretty well (I want to move on to reading music notation in the future), but what really upsets me is my lack of speed. Should I focus on getting a lead part mastered and then take it slowly day by day? Is that what will help me get faster and faster? Like I said, heavy metal/metalcore is what I live for. Being fast and clean will be key to me enjoying guitar.

Quote by MaggaraMarine
You just need to find a way to enjoy the guitar. You clearly want to play the guitar because otherwise you wouldn't ask this question. I'm sure when you started, you enjoyed it a lot. You just need to find a way to enjoy it again. Maybe you need to change your practicing habits. For example if you don't like technical exercises, just learn songs. You can learn the same things in context or out of context. For some people it gets easier when they can focus 100% on the technique and for some other people that kind of stuff just gets boring.

As I said, I think joining a band or just finding people to jam with would be the best thing to do. Also, write your own music. That kind of gives your playing skills some meaning.


Ha, writing music is far from where i'm at in terms of skill. I'm more of a solo guy, so not having people to jam with isn't so bad for now. Like I said, I just need help understanding patience, I guess. I know I won't be a Dave Mustaine overnight, but you know.

Quote by rocknroll93
think about all the hot chicks you're gonna get.

but seriously, just try to learn something a little above your skill level, and once you master that, try again. reaching for higher goals did the trick for me. probably that little bit of competitiveness in me


Chicks and free booze are just a bonus; i'm mainly in it for the feeling that i'll have by being able to put down my feelings into music. That's what i'm in for the long run.

Anyone else have some other advice? I started watching the Learn and Master Guitar by Gibson DVDs again earlier today. Very boring, but what can you do.
#15
Quote by Granata

Justin was great. I watched all his beginner videos, but he honestly didn't help much. By the time I finished his beginner course I got sick and tired of chords. All I did was chords, chords, chords. Kinda got fed up with it at one point.

Guitar playing is a lot about chords. I think you just need to find songs you like and learn to play them - it does get boring if you don't enjoy the songs you are playing. All songs have chords in them. Chords also get more interesting if you have somebody to sing/play the melody (or you sing the melody yourself). Chords don't really sound good on their own.

Metallica is great. Only thing I am proud of is that I can play the riff to For Whom The Bell Tolls and a much slower version of that lead part that Kirk does. What sucks is that I don't have anyone to jam to. I have two friends (one plays acoustic and the other drums) who get so damn cocky at times. The acoustic dude only plays chords, which isn't really anything to get cocky about. The drummer has been forcing the acoustic guy and I to learn this stupid song from like the 40s since last August. I gave up on them a long time ago, both friendship and musical wise.

If you want to play in a band, you pretty much need to make compromises. Three people rarely have exactly the same music taste. I think it's also good to learn to play a bit of different styles.

I learned a lot of Metallica when I started because that was my favorite band at the moment. I learned most stuff by ear. It was just the riffs, not leads, but I enjoyed it.

I have noticed that I pick up on this quickly. I can look at tabs for ten minutes and then play it out of memory without looking at it again, so yes, I can sight read tabs pretty well (I want to move on to reading music notation in the future), but what really upsets me is my lack of speed. Should I focus on getting a lead part mastered and then take it slowly day by day? Is that what will help me get faster and faster? Like I said, heavy metal/metalcore is what I live for. Being fast and clean will be key to me enjoying guitar.

Speed comes over time. You can't force it. It's a lot about muscle memory. You just need to know the part really well (play it at slower speed). You need to know exactly what to play when. If you force it, you may develop bad technique.

Ha, writing music is far from where i'm at in terms of skill. I'm more of a solo guy, so not having people to jam with isn't so bad for now. Like I said, I just need help understanding patience, I guess. I know I won't be a Dave Mustaine overnight, but you know.


Chicks and free booze are just a bonus; i'm mainly in it for the feeling that i'll have by being able to put down my feelings into music. That's what i'm in for the long run.

You can always write your own stuff. It doesn't need to be hard to play to sound good. Writing music is always a good idea. And your songs don't need to be that great. They don't need to be released. Just write for fun. Actually to me it sounds like you should write songs, because you said you want to express your feelings through music. That's why people usually write songs - they feel something.

As I said, it doesn't need to be technical. Just write something. The complex/technical songs that you know can be simplified to just chords and melody. You can always rearrange your song ideas and make them more interesting.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#16
Quote by Granata
This thread is called "How does a beginner motivate himself to not give up?", not "Someone help me give up faster." Either contribute, or don't even bother posting in here.



"So i've been on and off when it comes to guitar playing for about three years now. I played a little, put it down, played a little, put it down, played a little, and then put it down for a very long time"

After 3 years you are not a beginner anymore.

The answer is "just don't give up and quit". Relax and enjoy the journey. Patience is the big play.

Where are you in a hurry to get?

Are you in a hurry to be a rockstar or the next Yngwie? Forget about it. Talent will out if you have it. Not many do.

You've been playing for 3 years. How many total hours in that time? Be honest.

Over the next two years practice 2-3 hours a day/7 days a week. This is actual time spent practicing not goofing off/wasting time.

Keep a notebook. Set goals.

Learn a list of songs that you can play from memory. If you like AC/DC learn their songs or a song from each artist you really like or want to emulate.

From an interview with Lou Holtz - National Champion football coach:

Q: "Coach, how do you motivate your players?"

A: "I don't motivate players, I recruit players that are motivated."


Bingo!

If you cannot internally motivate yourself to do the above things then you are just not motivated with the guitar. This is not a crime or personal defect. It's just not your "thing". If it was your "thing" you wouldn't be asking us how to make you do it. You'd be doing it. Find something you are motivated to do and do it well. In the case of your guitar playing, relax and just enjoy it for what it is.
Last edited by Virgman at Feb 28, 2015,
#17
Well your problem is in your mindset of how you look at it.

You expect to suck so you do. You are telling everyone you suck so we believe you do. No need to post a video.

However you got to see the learning process as a challenge you can win period! Yes this coming from a 40 year old guy now learning Yngwie tunes.

Back in 1991 with my first electric Applause Strat copy and no amp I did not have a teacher but I learned about tab books and got what I desired to play and learn. Black album and Kill'em'all.

Like you I could easily follow most of the rhytm and make the tab sound right. Playing it over and over because I loved it made it a firm habit in my guitar skills at the time.

I never really practised just played.

To progress practise your favorite stuff along with a metronome until it is a planted habit and feels natural without one. Pretty soon you start to sound good as it will clean up your style and once it is a habit it is there!

But see it as a challenge and love it. From the gear to what comes out really.
#18
I have noticed that I pick up on this quickly. I can look at tabs for ten minutes and then play it out of memory without looking at it again, so yes, I can sight read tabs pretty well (I want to move on to reading music notation in the future), but what really upsets me is my lack of speed. Should I focus on getting a lead part mastered and then take it slowly day by day? Is that what will help me get faster and faster? Like I said, heavy metal/metalcore is what I live for. Being fast and clean will be key to me enjoying guitar.

As for basic technique get a hold on books by Troy Stetina like Speed Mechanics and Heavy metal lead guitar volume 1+2 or the The story dvd. That is the fast playing bible area in terms of teaching. Get serious with a metronome and you will improve and learn.

It covers all you need to know to play the faster/heavy lead styles you are into.

As far as mastering something.

Master what you desire on any given day!

Some days you do not feel like doing it but go to something else instead and then brush up later on it when the interest is back.
Last edited by anders.jorgense at Feb 28, 2015,
#19
Thanks for the replies, guys. Much more improvement in tips. I just feel like learning songs wouldn't help much as I am a beginner right now and don't know the right technique to use when strumming, picking, etc. Should I just take a look at the DVD till the end and in between try to play some songs that I like just to keep myself motivated? Will that work when it comes to actually learning and having fun along the way? Also, how long should I practice a day? 2 hours a day, 7 days a week like the above person mentioned? I just don't want to go above and beyond or else my brain won't process what i've learned.
Last edited by Granata at Feb 28, 2015,
#20
Whatever you want! It is your playing. There are no set rules when you play on you own!

So what motivates you and its different for all of us.

When you get older then chords is the thing or something. There is a time and space for everything but you decide what you want to learn.

Watching a DVD you will know how it ends and the content but learn and apply on your own time.

If you take Intense Rock I with Paul Gilbert which is on youtube learn and master on thing at the time is the thing. Intense Rock is just a good example. Troy Stetina explains it way better in Speed Mechanics.

As for time.

Find what works for you in order to get it down so it feels natural!

Once a guitar skill is a habit you can move on. A habit forms it self with repeats so a metronome helps you get it down accurate and clean.

Lastly always practise your weak spots whatever they are. Pick what comes first to mind as being weak.
Last edited by anders.jorgense at Feb 28, 2015,
#21
Quote by anders.jorgense
Whatever you want! It is your playing. There are no set rules when you play on you own!

So what motivates you and its different for all of us.

When you get older then chords is the thing or something. There is a time and space for everything but you decide what you want to learn.

Watching a DVD you will know how it ends and the content but learn and apply on your own time.

If you take Intense Rock I with Paul Gilbert which is on youtube learn and master on thing at the time is the thing. Intense Rock is just a good example. Troy Stetina explains is way better in Speed Mechanics.


The Speed Mechanics is a DVD? Have a link? If I get done with this current learn and master series by gibson i'll give that one a shot too.

And yes, it's my playing, but I just want to make sure that I learn proper technique along the way. I don't want to try and learn a song and have everything done wrong, you know? And how long should I practice a day? 2 hours a day, 7 days a week like the above person mentioned? I just don't want to go above and beyond or else my brain won't process what i've learned.

And one last thing: When I master speed at a certain solo of a song for example, will I naturally be fast at every other solo I hear? Or will I have to re-gain the speed on those too with time?
#22
SM is a book! An old classic from the early '90s and a must for fast players.

http://www.amazon.com/Speed-Mechanics-Lead-Guitar-Stetina/dp/0793509629

As an update Troy has done a dvd called Troy Stetina: The Sound and The Story

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwbgvd3-jPQ

Also earlier than SM the heavy metal lead guitar volume 1 + 2 + a lot of other guitar instruction.

SM is the proper technique along the way and if you stick with it along with learning songs of your own choice then it is the best you can do the earlier you get into it. I got my book in 1993 and 20 years later I am at ex 50 and finally playing with a upstroke and it feels natural.

You can do as much as you can take. I don't know how much guitar practise you need on a daily basis before you switch of the amp and put the guitar down. Just make sure you repeat the stuff daily so it goes down as a habit.

I find sometimes 30 minutes or less of something like picking or strumming to a metronome does enough for me to get it down.

Some months ago I had this picking pattern that was a weak spot. It was pretty simple but I never sat down with to a metronome and some little 15 -30 minutes with daily repeats made it a habit and now I pick it naturally and it sounds clean and accurate not as a beginner.

Learn a song wrong? Well if that happens you got a weak spot and then correct it once you know the "right way". Sometimes you can't tell what the artist played or how. You just have to put your spin on it and stick with the vibe of the song.

When I learned smoke on the water riff my then teacher showed me it on the low E. Actually it is in G and 5ths but I corrected it for next time I play it.

Yes if you have developed the skills and they sit as a natural habit in your guitar skills. Then you can play up to tempo where you are at.

As for regain speed it is more of a warmup and then you are there if your fingers are to stiff or cold or something. I do like some of the legato ex in the SM book and the speed is always there just accurate gets right 100% on the notes.
#23
Quote by Virgman
"So i've been on and off when it comes to guitar playing for about three years now. I played a little, put it down, played a little, put it down, played a little, and then put it down for a very long time"

After 3 years you are not a beginner anymore.

The answer is "just don't give up and quit". Relax and enjoy the journey. Patience is the big play.

Where are you in a hurry to get?

Are you in a hurry to be a rockstar or the next Yngwie? Forget about it. Talent will out if you have it. Not many do.

You've been playing for 3 years. How many total hours in that time? Be honest.

Over the next two years practice 2-3 hours a day/7 days a week. This is actual time spent practicing not goofing off/wasting time.

Keep a notebook. Set goals.

Learn a list of songs that you can play from memory. If you like AC/DC learn their songs or a song from each artist you really like or want to emulate.

From an interview with Lou Holtz - National Champion football coach:

Q: "Coach, how do you motivate your players?"

A: "I don't motivate players, I recruit players that are motivated."


Bingo!

If you cannot internally motivate yourself to do the above things then you are just not motivated with the guitar. This is not a crime or personal defect. It's just not your "thing". If it was your "thing" you wouldn't be asking us how to make you do it. You'd be doing it. Find something you are motivated to do and do it well. In the case of your guitar playing, relax and just enjoy it for what it is.

I agree and disagree.

You are treating guitar a bit like it's a sport or a competition.

People play for different reasons. Becoming decent at guitar isn't that hard. You don't need to practice 3 hours every day to become decent. If you want to "master" the instrument, then you need to practice a lot. But as I said, people play for different reasons. For somebody it's just a hobby. For me guitar is just a tool that I use to express myself. I don't practice a lot (I wouldn't really call it practicing - I just noodle around and play some songs). But I don't think I'm bad at playing the guitar. I can record my song ideas and play rhythmically accurately. I could play the guitar in a band. It didn't take that much practice - I played when I felt like playing and that's pretty much it (though I also play other instruments, which of course helps a lot).

If you want to continue the sports analogy, some people are just hobbyists. They play football for fun with their friends. They can become decent at it that way. They may not be motivated to practice every day, but that doesn't matter. They can still play football and they enjoy it. And I know that's what you also said in your post - just enjoy playing the guitar. Not everybody is the next Yngvie.


Also, sometimes you just lose motivation and need to find it again. TS wants to find the motivation, so he is actually motivated - he wants to play the guitar. He just needs to find a way that works for him. Not everybody finds it right away. A good teacher would help, but TS said he can't afford it.


I agree that TS should set some goals. What do you want to achieve? Do you want to be able to shred like Yngvie or just play songs that you like, maybe play in a band, maybe write your own stuff...

My own long time goal as a musician is to be able to write songs and to be able to play what I hear in my head. I also want to play in a band. And of course teach music theory - that's my future job and that's what I'm studying at the moment.


I actually agree with most of your points. What I didn't like was the sports analogy.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Feb 28, 2015,
#24
Quote by MaggaraMarine
I agree and disagree.

You are treating guitar a bit like it's a sport or a competition.

People play for different reasons. Becoming decent at guitar isn't that hard. You don't need to practice 3 hours every day to become decent. If you want to "master" the instrument, then you need to practice a lot. But as I said, people play for different reasons. For somebody it's just a hobby. For me guitar is just a tool that I use to express myself. I don't practice a lot (I wouldn't really call it practicing - I just noodle around and play some songs). But I don't think I'm bad at playing the guitar. I can record my song ideas and play rhythmically accurately. I could play the guitar in a band. It didn't take that much practice - I played when I felt like playing and that's pretty much it (though I also play other instruments, which of course helps a lot).

If you want to continue the sports analogy, some people are just hobbyists. They play football for fun with their friends. They can become decent at it that way. They may not be motivated to practice every day, but that doesn't matter. They can still play football and they enjoy it. And I know that's what you also said in your post - just enjoy playing the guitar. Not everybody is the next Yngvie.


Also, sometimes you just lose motivation and need to find it again. TS wants to find the motivation, so he is actually motivated - he wants to play the guitar. He just needs to find a way that works for him. Not everybody finds it right away. A good teacher would help, but TS said he can't afford it.


I agree that TS should set some goals. What do you want to achieve? Do you want to be able to shred like Yngvie or just play songs that you like, maybe play in a band, maybe write your own stuff...

My own long time goal as a musician is to be able to write songs and to be able to play what I hear in my head. I also want to play in a band. And of course teach music theory - that's my future job and that's what I'm studying at the moment.

I actually agree with most of your points. What I didn't like was the sports analogy.


First off, who's this Yngvie? Is he the next Slash or something?

And yes, I would love to put all my effort into guitar. Over the past few days I just watched some documentaries of some great musicians over the past few days and it was enough to spark that light that I need to play. With that said, I want to take it above it just being a hobby, and actually try to master it. I know that it won't take years to master, but decades, but hey, i'm going to give it a shot and hopefully i'll stick to it. Do you guys recommend 3 hours a day? Like I said, I don't want to overdo it to where I cram and won't remember anything. In the future when i'm free a little more from college i'll definitely invest in a teacher, but for now, it's just me and my DVDs.

ANy other tips before I get on my way? A lot of you have been really helpful
#25
First off, who's this Yngvie? Is he the next Slash or something?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eK0rvReE-4c

Not really my style of music, but he's a great guitarist.


But yeah, the more you practice, the better you will get. But if 3 hours doesn't feel good, practice less. Sometimes too much practice will bore you. I think quality is more important than quantity - but of course you get the best results by combining them. If you enjoy it, of course play as much as you want - you may want to play more than 3 hours a day and that's fine too. People like Jimi Hendrix and Eddie Van Halen played the guitar all the time because they enjoyed it so much. I bet for them practicing was just fun - it wasn't a thing they had to do, they did it because they loved it.

If you want to practice many hours a day, it is good to know what to practice. To practice efficiently, you need to focus on what you are practicing. You may want to have some kind of a practice routine.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#26
Yngwie is a Swedish guy who got obsessed in the '70s with Deep Purple/Rainbow and then violin music.

He then got obsessed with that and even in his teens a very relentless attitude and style. He did not go very far in Sweden but he send of a demo to Mike Varney in the US who brought him to America in the early 1980's.

Everyone was impressed and the bands Steeler and Alcatrazz were soon outgrown. He got a solo deal in 1984 and made his first Rising Force album by Yngwie J Malmsteen which is kind of the bench mark for his style of music.

Yngwie is a one of like any other guitar hero but an important one.

To the untrained ear he sounds like to much and to fast but he was the pioneer which every guitar picked up on in '80s and forward.

Far beyond the sun is his signature song form the first solo album.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7PC08BTxhI
#27
Quote by Granata
First off, who's this Yngvie? Is he the next Slash or something?

And yes, I would love to put all my effort into guitar. Over the past few days I just watched some documentaries of some great musicians over the past few days and it was enough to spark that light that I need to play. With that said, I want to take it above it just being a hobby, and actually try to master it. I know that it won't take years to master, but decades, but hey, i'm going to give it a shot and hopefully i'll stick to it. Do you guys recommend 3 hours a day? Like I said, I don't want to overdo it to where I cram and won't remember anything. In the future when i'm free a little more from college i'll definitely invest in a teacher, but for now, it's just me and my DVDs.

ANy other tips before I get on my way? A lot of you have been really helpful


Think it feel it do it!

If 3 hours every day do not seem like a hindrence but fun then by all means DO IT!

The more you do the more you get out of it. But keep it productive! Make sure that you learn and apply every day!
#28
Thanks for the advice guys On my way and started watching the DVDs again, and when I get bored i'll just try and learn some parts of some favorite songs of mine. Just got down the main riff that Slash does in Sweet Child of Mine in less than 30 minutes. As a beginner, i'm pretty proud of myself. I can't go as fast as Slash without messing up here and there, but it sounds pretty clean overall.

How long will it take for my fingers to build a callus? Sucks that after an hour they get really sore and start hurting.

ANd just to be clear, when I said that i've been on and off the guitar for three years, that means that I played it for a day for a couple of hours, didn't touch it for months, played it for an hour on one day, didn't touch it for another five months, etc.
Last edited by Granata at Mar 2, 2015,
#29
Morale and motivation are very important. I agree with Ryan, find yourself a good teacher - ideally for face-to-face lessons. They will give you a short-term reason to keep going when morale takes a little knock. They should also help you progress far fast than on your own. This in itself is good for morale. Ultimately, we all need to feel that we are making good progress.
#30
Quote by Granata
Thanks for the advice guys On my way and started watching the DVDs again, and when I get bored i'll just try and learn some parts of some favorite songs of mine. Just got down the main riff that Slash does in Sweet Child of Mine in less than 30 minutes. As a beginner, i'm pretty proud of myself. I can't go as fast as Slash without messing up here and there, but it sounds pretty clean overall.

How long will it take for my fingers to build a callus? Sucks that after an hour they get really sore and start hurting.

ANd just to be clear, when I said that i've been on and off the guitar for three years, that means that I played it for a day for a couple of hours, didn't touch it for months, played it for an hour on one day, didn't touch it for another five months, etc.


The time is takes.

Well done on the Sweet child riff. Now get a metronome and play it along with it until it feels natural without it.

Your fingers will develop quickly the more time you put into it and if it hurts just stop until it stops hurting. Then back on the horse!
#31
I'll add my tuppence worth. My wife bought me a guitar 4 years ago, I spent about 2 months trying to learn all manner of songs, with loads of different chords and got nowhere, so dumped it in a cupboard.
Then in january I was at a mates, he got his guitar out, and started jamming, and I grabbed another one and started messing withhim, and bloody loved it. So I hit on a new strategy. I was going to perfect transitions between G, C D and Em, in any order. So I then realised there is a shedload of tunes with those chords. So in little over a month I now have a repetroire of about 7 songs I can now safely say, "I can play that". As a result I've added Am and A, and now working on F and Dm, to add to song list. Could be an idea for you, start small, work hard at it, then go big? I'm offshore right now, slipping off every couple of hours to have a wee mess about. Most difficult thing I'm finding is picking up strum patterns for songs, as I don't have Youtube access here due to slow internet. Damn annoying as I can't suss Demons by Imagination Dragons. Anyway, keep at it man.
#32
Your guitar playing goals...

Do you have any specific guitar playing goals written on paper?

Goals such as:

* Being able to create a melody in your mind and play it instantly on the guitar
* Recording your own professional sounding CD
* Getting your music played on the radio
* Performing in front of hundreds of people live and making them scream your name
* Playing guitar at 1000 notes per minute

These goals are absolutely realistic for you, and every single person who REALLY wants to achieve them. If you have a deep desire, a fire within you, and a total 100% commitment to your goals, you can do it. You can do anything you put your mind to.

However, there is a lot of work involved. You WILL need a guitar teacher, a music coach, a mentor to walk you through the process until you get there. Someone who's already achieved these goals, and can help you achieve them too.

Not a professor at a university. He doesn't know how to do these things, or he would be out doing them himself.
Not a local guitar teacher who teaches how to play ACDC songs.
I mean a REAL rockstar who is offering to share all the secrets involved with 'making it' in the music industry. They are difficult to find, but they exist. Someone who has worked very, very hard to survive in the music industry, and can explain exactly why he is successful, and why there are so many who are unsuccessful no matter how hard they try.

Now...

These goals you have...

How would it feel for you if you do NOT accomplish them?

How would you feel if you just give up along the way. If you look back at your life when you are older and think "Wow.. if only I had tried to actually become somebody in my life."

How would that feel for you?

I can tell you I've made this my life goal, to become a pro. I've invested thousands of dollars into my music training and I've learned how to survive as a musician. I actually make a LOT of money teaching guitar, more than I've ever made in my life in any other career.

What about your dreams?

Are you 100% committed to becoming a great guitar player?

Or are you just going to give up because it's hard, or frustrating, or because studying scales and music theory is 'boring'?

Your choice.
#33
You might think about giving the Gibson material another shot.
I started it 2 years ago and I've learned a great deal. I now can
Read music, play songs with single notes and chords and play
along with CD's.
The first 2 sessions (1st DVD) are kinda dry as they cover the
Most basic information. When you get into sessions 3&4 you
will really start to feel it coming together.
We have a forum dedicated to the course with literally
thousands of fellow students who are more than happy to give
instructions, encouragement or advice. There's also a 1 hour live
lesson with Steve Krenz (teacher on the DVD's) on Tuesday nights at
8:00 pm EST, on Ustream.
Here's the URL for the forum, check it out you'll get some good advice from
people who've been where you are and I'm one of them.
http://community.learnandmaster.com/index.php?/forum/1-gibsons-learn-master-guitar/r/">http://community.learnandmaster.com/index.php?/forum/1-gibsons-learn-master-guitahttp://community.learnandmaster.com/index.php?/forum/1-gibsons-learn-master-guitar/r/

I wish you success ☺
Paully
Be excellent to each other ☺
Paully
Last edited by Paully1 at Mar 7, 2015,
#34
Once you make some personal breakthroughs your self-esteem will increase and you'll find you're willing to learn more complicated pieces.

The hardest bit is the very beginning because it's always going to be somewhat of a chore. But once you can play along to even one song that will give you something fun to play with in between practice and levelling up.

My other tip is to take bite size chunks rather than biting off more than you can chew. It's great to have a goal but you're never going to be able to play something perfect right off the bat (especially at your level). I find sometimes I'll set myself a goal - this week I'm going to learn the verse of song X. Then I'll move onto the chorus and so forth. Works for me at least.

Bear in mind I'm no expert. I've been strumming cowboy chords for years (and not all that well) but for the last 9 months I made a concerted effort to actually put the time in and get good. I would never have guessed I'd be where I am now. Still a huge road ahead but it's good to reflect on personal achievements.
#35
Keep comeing to this site and watch u tube videos of people and kids playing guiatr
#36
learning guitar is hard and takes a long time. just remember that next time you are thinking "this is hard and takes ****ing forever". no shit its hard you dumbass

what motivated me to pick up guitar again last week (i done the "try it for 1 week" thing over the past 10 years) was suddenly thinking about playing infront of a crowd like an anime vocaloid hero (yeah i dont know real musicians lol). that feeling of expressing yourself in something you love with great power. you only live once and if i ever want to do that i need to start now (age 30 but maybe die soon lol)

by the way i think a lot of people learnt when they were young over many years, from the age of 15 to 20 thats 5 years so when you see 20 year olds decent at guitar remember they had a good 5 years of playing already. if i am 30 i guess i cant expect to be good in 2 months time like i expect to be good like a 20 year old just because i'm older than him XD

i think if you replace computer games with guitar then its easy. but if you still play computer games then dont bother lol. (i quit dota. i probably could have learnt guitar 5x over in the time i played dota over the last 2 years)

technically i've found the last few days (my first few days) that doing the most basic thing is way more of a challenge on guitar than it is on a piano. you need to practice not just a phrase of 20 notes or even break it down to a phrase of 10 notes, but you need to practice the most basic transition between each 2 or 3 notes over and over and over again. its ****ed up! BUT if you do try the same 3 notes over and over and over again you will find after 20 minutes you are starting to do them a little bit faster at last. it does work its just bloody hard as hell to make progress compared to most other things you're used to

you can fluently memorise a line or 5 lines of japanese alphabet characters in a day but playing 3 or 5 notes fluently on the guitar , its been a week (probably 4 hrs/day) and such little progress lol

fyi my fingers are a lot tougher already after 6 days but i played like a maniac really and also avoided chords (just try guitar solo) which meant i could moderate damage to my fingers a lot better, no sliding or pressing like a ****** trying to hit chords etc. also took a day off coz they wudnt heal otherwise (i know a lot about gym/bodybuilding so im familiar with how to moderate rest + work)

now they are a bit tougher i can start to work on the open chords and transitions without getting too frustrated one would hope. it aches the shit out of my neck standing up with this guitar hanging tho which is a bit unexpected annoyance

EDIT: wait what it doesnt go around your neck wtf? i literally would have been standing here with aching neck the rest of my life if i didnt write all this bullshit to myself in forums

its really a good thing im not one of those guys who had to learn from the radio
Last edited by percydw at Mar 13, 2015,
#37
Quote by percydw
learning guitar is hard and takes a long time. just remember that next time you are thinking "this is hard and takes ****ing forever". no shit its hard you dumbass

what motivated me to pick up guitar again last week (i done the "try it for 1 week" thing over the past 10 years) was suddenly thinking about playing infront of a crowd like an anime vocaloid hero (yeah i dont know real musicians lol). that feeling of expressing yourself in something you love with great power. you only live once and if i ever want to do that i need to start now (age 30 but maybe die soon lol)

by the way i think a lot of people learnt when they were young over many years, from the age of 15 to 20 thats 5 years so when you see 20 year olds decent at guitar remember they had a good 5 years of playing already. if i am 30 i guess i cant expect to be good in 2 months time like i expect to be good like a 20 year old just because i'm older than him XD

i think if you replace computer games with guitar then its easy. but if you still play computer games then dont bother lol. (i quit dota. i probably could have learnt guitar 5x over in the time i played dota over the last 2 years)

technically i've found the last few days (my first few days) that doing the most basic thing is way more of a challenge on guitar than it is on a piano. you need to practice not just a phrase of 20 notes or even break it down to a phrase of 10 notes, but you need to practice the most basic transition between each 2 or 3 notes over and over and over again. its ****ed up! BUT if you do try the same 3 notes over and over and over again you will find after 20 minutes you are starting to do them a little bit faster at last. it does work its just bloody hard as hell to make progress compared to most other things you're used to

you can fluently memorise a line or 5 lines of japanese alphabet characters in a day but playing 3 or 5 notes fluently on the guitar , its been a week (probably 4 hrs/day) and such little progress lol

fyi my fingers are a lot tougher already after 6 days but i played like a maniac really and also avoided chords (just try guitar solo) which meant i could moderate damage to my fingers a lot better, no sliding or pressing like a ****** trying to hit chords etc. also took a day off coz they wudnt heal otherwise (i know a lot about gym/bodybuilding so im familiar with how to moderate rest + work)

now they are a bit tougher i can start to work on the open chords and transitions without getting too frustrated one would hope. it aches the shit out of my neck standing up with this guitar hanging tho which is a bit unexpected annoyance

EDIT: wait what it doesnt go around your neck wtf? i literally would have been standing here with aching neck the rest of my life if i didnt write all this bullshit to myself in forums

its really a good thing im not one of those guys who had to learn from the radio



Maybe you need this course.


http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-000-BeginnersCourse.php

^^^ Course above.