#1
Would it be possible to create a twenty-four tone matrix instead of the twelve? By doubling the amount of notes in the chart?
#2
You can divide an octave into any amount of notes you want. You're thinking of 24-tone equal temperament if I'm understanding this right.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arab_tone_system

Also, musician talk would be the proper board for this
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#3
Yes, you can. Quarter tones are common these days. But the question is why? Creating 24-tone music doesn't bring anything new to the table. Do you have a concept?
#4
I think what is being asked here is if you can do a 24 tone row in the sense that you would use each note in 12TET twice before repeating notes.

My gut answer is no. That'd just be two 12 tone rows.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#5
I mean you could have a 24 pitch matrix for classic serialism, but would have to use quarter tones and subdivide the traditional chomratic pitches. The problem with 24 tones instead of 12 performance wise would probably be related to intonation. You see, pitches are not absoult, the same pitch has a little bit of wiggle room, and if you have a texture that is thick or uses chords, then certain pitches will move up down slightly to "fit"/"lock" into place, even if the chords are atonal. When you cut the notes in half and have 24 pitches instead of 12, you risk having certain notes sound sharper/flatter than you might want and you'll probably loose some clarity. If you could get a machine or a virutouso to play the part then you wont have as many issues though. You would also have to find a way to notate/describe the new pitches.

Now if you are asking if you can use the same pitch twice in one row, so 24 pitches consiting of all the chromatic notes, then no you can't, that defeats the point of serialism (Which is what Jet Penguin said). The point of serialism is to give every pitch equal weight in a composition. I guess you can have two matrixes going on at the same time, like treat each one as its own musical entity and use them in counterpoint or stratify them or something like that, but it wouldn't be considered classical 12-tone serialism.
Last edited by mhillips at Mar 6, 2015,
#6
Yeah, if anything, it seems grossly unnecessary.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#7
Making a matrix in general is usually "grossly unnecessary," but the idea of a tone row using more than twelve tones isn't that crazy. I'm sure it's been done and isn't that different conceptually from a cantus firmus or ground bass in a passacaglia or chaconne really.

In any case it would be serial but not twelve tone. It would depend on a lot of things and how it's structured and stuff, but it doesn't really matter cause TS has abandoned thread anyway.
#8
"It would depend on a lot of things..., but it doesn't really matter cause TS has abandoned thread anyway."

Welcome to MT.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#9
if it's not diagonalizable then you may run into trouble later
i don't know why i feel so dry