#1
Hey guys, I have a question for those that know how to physics.
Where the hell do I start acoustic treating my room?
It's an odd shaped room with a window to the right of me and a fitted wardrobe to the left.
Unfortunately nothing can be done to the layout of the room (e.g. remove the cupboard) because I'm a tenant. I also don't have a fortune to spend.

Here's a sketchup model of my room with measurements and locations of major furniture:

Warning: large images










Basically, I just want to reduce the early reflections/echoing I get when miking an acousic guitar/upright bass.
The room also rattles significantly with heavy bass.

A good place to link to suggested items is HERE (thomann)

Thanks in advance!
#4
Quote by jaspervdv
well, I don't know much about acoustic treatment but if you don't have a lot to spend you may want to consider building the stuff yourself?

My friend and I build a small studio with mineral wool pads and basstraps and it works really well.
it only takes a lot of time


Yeah, I'm quite happy doing it myself, the problem being just not knowing what will work best for the shape/layout of my room.
#5
well, there is a website were you can calculate the waves that will bounce around in your room.
and how thick the padding must be to eliminate the annoying standing waves.
but i forgot the name of the site

I saw it in a internet course on creativelive. I cannot tell you more about it, it was actually about recording guitar
#6
Major point would be panels in every corner, for bass trapping, on the walls behind, and in front of, your monitors. A cloud over your desk would also be good. To find reflection points on your side wall, just take a mirror and run it along the wall until you see one of your monitors in it. Put a panel there.

For mixing your amp, you might consider a portable "gobo" panel that you can place behind the mic, but unless you're recording at low volume, or with a condenser mic, you should be getting much effect from the room.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#7
In addition to what other have said, pull your desk and monitors away from the wall. Just get it like a foot or two out, and move the monitors along with it. This makes a GIGANTIC difference in conjunction with the treatment.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#8
Thanks guys! where would you suggest actually putting the bass traps, though? Both the door and window corners have what looks like too little room to put traps before they cover the window or door.
Also, the wardrobe door? I don't usually use it since it's just old storage (there's been a shelf in front of it for the past few months). Should I just find a non-glue way of hanging it so it can be removed to open the door occasionally?

Here's the door/wall gap. (another large image)
Taken while decorating, so please excuse the dirtiness of the frame and the hanging switch
#9
Haven't got too much to add to this at the moment, unfortunately, but aside from the great advice (especially the mirror tip from Derek - one I've never thought of using but makes so much sense!) I just wanted to say congratulations TS for actually providing really good information in your OP, with enough detail for us to help right from the first post If only more questioning users were like yourself.


Anyway, it depends how much of an issue bass buildup is to you at the moment and on the size of your monitors' woofers etc. but I would imagine there is not a fat lot you can do about the room rattling with low end as, to me, that suggests something to do with the structure of the room itself being a bit susceptible to those frequencies (unless you can try and follow the rattle when playing a low sine wave at the frequency that excites it the most, and discover if it's actually just an item of furniture in the room). Even if it is structural, if you try the sine wave tip you may be able to figure out where the majority of the problem is coming from - if it's a resonant frequency affecting something in the walls or ceiling etc. you may be able to compensate for it by Helmholtz resonators tuned around that frequency placed in the two corners behind the monitors (though experiment if you do try them, and maybe put them in the opposing corners if you can find some that will fit).
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#10
Wow lots of good info here. My only suggestion is to use a handheld RTA and find your hot frequencies in the room. Even a phone app with a decent condenser mic will work. Once you identify the modes you can build bass traps to 1/4 wave where most of the energy is to get the greatest control over these standing waves. You will never eliminate them but 6-9db attenuation will make a big difference in your mix.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Mar 3, 2015,
#11
Maybe put some emphasis on your monitoring position, by adding acoustic foam to the sides at Kevel with your ear.
Believe it or not but curtains, duvets and such help with taming verb.
For vocals you could get iso screen, seems to fix most room problems when tracking:
http://images.whybuynew.co.uk/1/1346932125_03.jpg

Write to Sound on sound.com - they do studio visits, might get them to tackle the issue for you.
#12
So, do you guys think that THIS would be a good starting point to reduce some of the echoing?
Also, I am planning to fit some curtains. Probably beige/grey blackout curtains to be as deadening as possible.


Quote by DisarmGoliath
I just wanted to say congratulations TS for actually providing really good information in your OP, with enough detail for us to help right from the first post If only more questioning users were like yourself.

Thanks! I like to research at least briefly before I ask questions and the 3D model I had from when I was furnishing and decorating my room, so it only seemed natural to include it along with as many dimensions as possible
Last edited by CorrosionMedia at Mar 3, 2015,
#13
Quote by CorrosionMedia
So, do you guys think that THIS would be a good starting point to reduce some of the echoing?
Also, I am planning to fit some curtains. Probably beige/grey blackout curtains to be as deadening as possible.


Thanks! I like to research at least briefly before I ask questions and the 3D model I had from when I was furnishing and decorating my room, so it only seemed natural to include it along with as many dimensions as possible


I have some Auralex foam in my studio and it is the least effective but better than nothing approach. GIK panels and bass traps absorb about 3x as much problem (below 300hz) frequencies and do most of the heavy lifting in my corners.
http://www.gikacoustics.com/comparing-foam-to-gik-244-bass-traps/
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#14
Quote by Cajundaddy
I have some Auralex foam in my studio and it is the least effective but better than nothing approach. GIK panels and bass traps absorb about 3x as much problem (below 300hz) frequencies and do most of the heavy lifting in my corners.
http://www.gikacoustics.com/comparing-foam-to-gik-244-bass-traps/


That GIK stuff seems to be REALLY high quality. It's just a shame that one or two panels or a single bass trap would take up my entire budget!

Basically, at the moment, I just want to reduce some of the echoing and boxiness I get when recording acoustic guitars with a condenser.
Here's a quick and dirty dry demo of some acoustic playing with my current setup:
http://corrosionmedia.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/acc1.mp3
The mic as at approximately the 12th fret around 1' away.
#15
The acoustic guitar doesn't seem bad, you usually have to compress and eq so I'd say it is about normal. Maybe you can try recording with the back of mic facing a duvet so you don't get wall reflections from the back but the part was workable.
Here's what I got with quick eq and compression treatment:

https://soundcloud.com/descentintomadness/acc-test/s-aL2kI
#16
If money is tight you could probably build 2 bass traps and 6 first reflection panels for about $100 and a little elbow grease. Lots of how-tos on youtube. They result in a lot more broad spectrum coverage than Auralex foam. A pair of moveable panels is also useful for acoustic guitar and vocals.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqZPhfxSaTk
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Mar 3, 2015,
#17
That's a really unfortunately placed window. I wish there were a way you could reposition things in the room more effectively, but I can't think of any obvious solution.

Poor symmetry is going to make mixing hard, but it won't be a problem for tracking your acoustic or upright. The room is pretty small, but you should still be able to get a pretty good sound. I'd suggest you stay away from Auralex and build the panels yourself, though. It's not too hard, and they'll work much better. Auralex panels only control high frequency reflections well, and aren't really full broadband traps.