#1
I have this little problem, I have been learning guitar for 2 months now and I am currently learning Bruno Mars Treasure, I know everything all the chords and chord sequences but when I play with the backing track it all goes to crap but without the backing track I am fine, I can hit everything right most of the times. Can anyone advise me how I can improve this, I don't want this to impact my learning in the future.
#2
You may be getting distracted by the backing track.
And you probably haven't been practicing with a metronome.

You just need to train your brain.

One, always practice with a metronome. Chances are good you'll find a whole lot of places where you're NOT fine with all the chords and the chord sequences, but without the metronome (or backing track) you get to stop and restart.

Two, you can slow down the backing track. If you're playing to a computer, you can get something called The Amazing Slower Downer (there are others as well) that slows down the backing track while maintaining the pitch. If you have a Korg Pandora (little practice gizmo), there's a slower downer built in.

If you practice with the metronome/slower-downer at a much slower speed than the original, you learn how to steam through the whole thing without mistakes. You don't speed things up UNTIL you can do it slow without mistakes. Then you take it up a bit at a time, moving up another speed level (might take you several days, even a few weeks) only when you can do it completely through without mistakes. You'll hit a couple of plateaus along the way (your brain is building new neural pathways) and then suddenly you'll find faster is easier. I usually take the speed up faster, to about 120% of what it's supposed to be, before I call it "learned." At that point, it's dirt easy to do it at normal speed, and if I DO screw up, it's easy to pick up again quickly.
#3
Maybe the tempo is messing you up... You practicing it at speed? Perhaps work with a metronome first for a while.

Like everything with the guitar - Just keep doing it & don't beat yourself up too much when you fail a bit.

Best 2 pieces of advice I can give you.

#4
Metronome. Or find a friend who plays drums. You're having trouble playing to the beat. When you play by yourself, you're setting the tempo. It will probably sound fine on your own, but throw in the backing track, and you're all over the place.
Also, keep going. You're only 2 months in.
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#5
You've only been playing for two months. Realize that this is going to take time. Trying to play along with songs you like can end up being frustrating - I know. Keep working on the song without the backing track. This will help you work on the chord changes without being rushed by the tempo of the recorded track. When you do introduce the backing track, don't worry about missing chords. Just pick up the next chord and keep going. You will eventually improve your chord changes and get smoother.

Working with a metronome can be good, however you really need to work on getting the tempo set in your head. Metronomes are good for setting a steady beat. They're also bad for setting a steady beat. Songs occasionally change tempo and if you're using a metronome, then it's not going to work so well. Use the metronome to help improve your timing and then ditch it. I'm sure there are some who will scoff at that recommendation, but it's better to rely on your internal metronome, rather than a physical one. If you happen to join a band, chances are you won't use one at all - unless you're in the studio using a click track.

So, give yourself some time and as the others have mentioned, don't beat yourself up. You will make mistakes - but realize that the longer you play, the better you will become.
#6
Everything said so far is great advise. I'll add that the skill of dividing your attention; that is LISTENING and keeping along with music as WELL as playing the chord changes and rhythms, is what is being developed here. You are going beyond just playing chords and strumming and every skill you acquire, including this new one of playing along with music, only comes from repetition.

Use the Amazing Slow Downer or even Windows Media Player if you have a windows OS and keep at it. You WILL get better. Good luck
#7
playing in perfect time requires practice and focus. until you can play the part reliably and almost effortlessly, you're spending your focus on playing correctly, so you're less able to focus on timing. get the part down until you can play it in your sleep, first.
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#8
Quote by KG6_Steven

Working with a metronome can be good, however you really need to work on getting the tempo set in your head. Metronomes are good for setting a steady beat. They're also bad for setting a steady beat. Songs occasionally change tempo and if you're using a metronome, then it's not going to work so well. Use the metronome to help improve your timing and then ditch it. I'm sure there are some who will scoff at that recommendation, but it's better to rely on your internal metronome, rather than a physical one. If you happen to join a band, chances are you won't use one at all - unless you're in the studio using a click track.


That's what I'd have thought. I've never really used a metronome, and I think (citation needed ) my timing is as good as, or better than, most. I've never had anyone complain about my timing, or at least very, very rarely.

I'm not anti-metronome but I think it's more useful for specific things (e.g. remedial timing work, or maybe trying to get up to super-speed for ultra-hardcore-shredding) than as a panacea. I've certainly seen people post things in the forums along the lines of- "If you don't use a metronome, your timing *WILL* suck." I don't agree with that at all. In fact, in certain situations I could actually see it doing more harm than good, as you said- making you a bit robotic rather than having a more musical appreciation of timing, for example, or even becoming a crutch to the extent that you can't play in time without one.
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#9
1) Your first priority should be learning songs by playing along with the actual track!!!!!!! This is why learning by ear is so important and much better than simply looking at chord charts or tabs. Pay close attention to the rhythm and lock in while playing. Practicing on your own without the track is fine once you've put in some time, but you need to begin by learning a song with the actual song so that you learn it properly. If you can't play a song along with the track, you can't play the song. This sometimes means having to listen to the same four bars of a song 100 times to get it right - be patient.

2) metronome - get one and learn to play whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, triplets etc. etc. Timing is vital to being a good player and it doesn't come naturally to everyone. A player with bad rhythm is a terrible player - make rhythm your first priority. I don't think Dave Mc's advice is proper on this subject. I agree that not everyone needs a metronome to have great timing , but if you fall in the category of people who don't have great natural timing - you're playing is seriously going to suffer if you don't take the time really dig into note subdivisions. You don't need to spend all your time practicing with a metronome, but you should put in some time.
#10
^ I said metronomes were useful for remedial timing work, which seems to be what you're saying. We're in complete agreement. I agree that if you have poor timing that you need to get that fixed ASAP (and that having terrible timing makes you a terrible player), and metronomes are probably one of the better ways to do that effectively.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?