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#1
I've been making lists and collecting hordes of bands over the past couple years of all the new releases and new bands. I don't see any reason to listen to most of the bands over the classic stuff, or I can't justify listening to newer releases over something I would genuinely enjoy more.

The times a new band has floored me are far and few between me and it's getting more difficult to hype up these newer releases if I don't personally see any reason to listen to them. I mean, I get a few bands here or there I enjoy, but rarely are there bands that I would stop whatever I'm doing and be forced to listen to it.

Are you biased towards older releases, and why are you?

First exposure? Real life experiences? Hype? Are you more comfortable listening to music you're familiar with?


I was going to listen to another reverb vocaled, murky guitar, blast beating death metal earlier, but I chose None So Vile instead, and I don't even feel guilty.
#2
I listen to new shit when I'm feeling curious or when I have spun my classic record 10 too many times. Either way, I don't purposely listen to new shit with the intentions of "discovering" something; It's a way to kill time. You can always hit Stop and put Blood Fire Death in.

This applies to music in general, not just Metal.

Listening to new shit can also reveal insight into future greatness. I called Iceland exploding with new bands before it actually happened and lo and behold we have Misþyrming, Naðra, Mannveira etc bringing some Black fukking darkness to the table.
A heathen, conceivably
but not,

I hope,
I’m not ashamed to be white
Vi doede ikke... vi har aldri levd
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind
Civilization is unnatural

It is a whim of circumstance
an unenlightened one
Last edited by VampireGoldfish at Mar 2, 2015,
#3
I think I just often end up hearing the same things rather than considering them "influences" or "inspirations"

most of the "new" stuff I get excited about ends up being in some style that I am somewhat new to (ie hardcore or avant garde right now)

but in a similar way to you, there does seem to be a real lack of exciting "new" avenues in metal. often I'll browse various tags on bandcamp for the popular recent stuff and pretty much everything metal is something I find dull and just prefer some older band who has done it over already. I also go to smaller new band gigs or try and catch opening acts at established ones but pretty much always come away underwhelmed, usually from feeling like they are just rehashing something done over and over or doing some "new" trendy thing (ie -core crossover meh, proggy rip offs or djent-ish nonsense)

pretty much all of my "new" metal purchases are just the latest releases from long-standing bands and half the time I'm buying that record out of loyalty (as long as it's acceptable quality)


when I do get that craving for metal, I have some band I'm thinking of and I just go and listen to that band instead of finding some newer group doing some interesting take on it.


hard to say if this is just a thing that happens when you stick with a genre for long enough or if there is some kind of epidemic in metal.
O.K.

“There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want.”
~ Bill Watterson


O__o
#4
I listen to some new stuff frequently, but I have a tendency to either stick to the classics or look for old "hidden gems" if you will.
#5
New stuff is like going to Blockbuster. You are well aware there is a high chance you're in for a turd, but you should have fun with that turd before flushing it. In this day and age of instant internet, listening to new stuff is as harmless as it will ever be.
A heathen, conceivably
but not,

I hope,
I’m not ashamed to be white
Vi doede ikke... vi har aldri levd
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind
Civilization is unnatural

It is a whim of circumstance
an unenlightened one
#6
Quote by VampireGoldfish
New stuff is like going to Blockbuster. You are well aware there is a high chance you're in for a turd, but you should have fun with that turd before flushing it. In this day and age of instant internet, listening to new stuff is as harmless as it will ever be.



it is kind of an effort though? I don't know how others do it, but I find I have to actually make time to "browse" new music. yeah sure it's a lot easier now compared to the past of attending shows or borrowing CDs off someone but it just means that amount of time spent discussing a few bands for a gem is replaced with a solo effort of skimming through a huge list every so often.


like a week or so ago, I browsed various genre tags on bandcamp for a whole sunday evening and ended up with 30 ep/cd downloads/purchases, none of which were metal (one was a little bit metal I guess, some kind of mr bungle rip off group) and that was just because I was just like "meh so-and-so is better at this" for pretty much every metal band I browsed rather than me actively disliking the music on it's own.


now is that a thing about metal or is it just "metal" as a genre, is no longer fresh for me?
O.K.

“There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want.”
~ Bill Watterson


O__o
#7
I am like this with all music in general. If I find a contemporary record that really looks like it would hit all my checkmarks I will snatch it and try but the majority of them I find derivative and rehashed ideas, and end up going back to the old stuff. I can get VG's perspective but at this point to me it often feels like wasting time when I know I could be listening to something that i will get super into as opposed to something i will think is just okay or something I won't care for at all after having finished listening to it. I think part of this is that I always have a huge trove of older music that I still haven't listened to awaiting me and due to my personal preferences I like much more of past music than I do of contemporary stuff so it's really just a safer bet for hearing music I can really dig. another part is that for any genre I would say it starts out with more inspired and original ideas and as the ideas become more widespread and there are more people trying them they in turn get diluted and you hear more of the same stuff being used in newer releases, so with any style I am inclined to find it's roots and start there, progressing chronologically until the point where I think the bad starts to outnumber the good


and as far as metal specifically goes at this point i really have no motivation to listen to anything new. if it's something you guys really stress as a classic that I missed during my metal years I will check it as there's a good chance it will have the same spirit of the classics I love but I really don't see myself ever looking for more metal on my own. My need for it is so minimal at this point that I already have much more than I could require.
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
Last edited by romencer17 at Mar 2, 2015,
#8
i don't bother listening to new bands that do the same old stuff (melodeath is full of this, for example). so, when i want new music, i'm either getting into old classics in genres i never quite got into, or looking for avant-garde stuff.

the last new discovery i truly got excited about was Terra Tenebrosa ("The Purging", 2013).
Quote by archerygenious
Jesus Christ since when is the Pit a ****ing courtroom...

Like melodic, black, death, symphonic, and/or avant-garde metal? Want to collaborate? Message me!
#9
When it comes to metal I can still find bands from the past 5 years that release an album that really sticks with me and I can appreciate, but those releases are, as you said, few and far between. A lot of the time I'll get this feeling that I can just listen to an older band that's done the sound those new bands are trying to achieve and I end up listening to the old guard soon after. Dead Congregation is an example of this: When I hear songs like Serpentskin or Grave Of The Archangels it's badass and I love it, but that feeling of "I want to listen to Diabolical Conquest now" always comes up and that's usually what ends up happening.

Now, I will say that I don't have this feeling with a lot of other music. Hip-hop? Bunch of modern stuff that I think is awesome and I enjoy moreso than the classics. Hardcore? Been listening to a bunch of hardcore and screamo bands that have come out in the past few years that really resonate with me. So on and so forth, and I think the reason there's a difference between other music and metal is that I've spent more time listening to and digging around metal music than I have any other kind of music.
#10
Most of the time when I'm looking for "new" music, I just end up listening to something I haven't heard before whether it is something contemporary, or an album that I missed along the way, but it's mostly albums that were released like twenty years ago that I missed.

My biggest incentive with listening to contemporary metal though is that I want to see where the genre is going and what the general direction seems to be. I'm interested in how the genre is evolving; however, I can understand how we can get caught up thinking about influences, so we just end up tracing a newer band back to the original innovators of that style.

I do feel though I have reached a point where I really just don't care when an album was released. I think of it the same way I think of books. Everyone talks about Melville, Poe, or Dostoevsky; but there are a seemingly endless number of authors who have taken up the mantle since then, and if you look through them, you're likely to find something that resonates with you regardless of its popularity and critical acclaim.
Quote by Senor Kristian
Viking fact no. 1: Viking helmets did not have horn.
Viking fact no. 2: Vikings tobogganed on their shields into battle.
Viking fact no. 3: Vikings drank mead.
Viking fact no. 4: One of your ancestors are likely to have been raped by a viking.
#11
Into Oblivion weaves chromatic melodies into songs structured like mid-era Bathory -- certain in its gradual movement, bringing forth a spirit of reverence towards things of a grand scale.

Some people dismiss it as pretentious and excessive, but they know naught

This album was released in 2010
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NtrhNYnNXzA
lstfm

I'm a Nazi, baby
I'm a Nazi, yes I am
I'm a Nazi schatzi, you know I'll fight for the Fatherland
#12
Wildchild being the voice of reason in a thread? What is this, 2013?

WC is right folks, Creation of a Monolith wrecks dicks into the dirt and has a Det som en gang var album cover.

Virtuoso is correct in his post as well.
A heathen, conceivably
but not,

I hope,
I’m not ashamed to be white
Vi doede ikke... vi har aldri levd
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind
Civilization is unnatural

It is a whim of circumstance
an unenlightened one
Last edited by VampireGoldfish at Mar 3, 2015,
#13
I prefer conflict. But that's beside the point. Good stuff fellas, I'll read your replies sometime this weekend and throw in some stuff later.

But at least five of you are wrong and I'm not going to say who.
#14
Quote by severed-metal
I prefer conflict. But that's beside the point. Good stuff fellas, I'll read your replies sometime this weekend and throw in some stuff later.

But at least five of you are wrong and I'm not going to say who.



O.K.

“There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want.”
~ Bill Watterson


O__o
#15
everything you've heard was new to you at some point. eventually the law of diminishing returns sets in and it gets harder to find good stuff. i've been listening to metal since the early 70s so i know all about that. agree that in many cases much of the new metal does little for me. knowing this i tend to narrow my search into sub catagories that are more promising to me. i tend to go for Power Metal type stuff as cookie monster vocals and death metal type stuff has little to no appeal. occasionally i get rewarded by finding a band that i really like that is new.
#16
Quote by The Wildchild
Into Oblivion weaves chromatic melodies into songs structured like mid-era Bathory -- certain in its gradual movement, bringing forth a spirit of reverence towards things of a grand scale.

Some people dismiss it as pretentious and excessive, but they know naught

This album was released in 2010
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NtrhNYnNXzA

I've met 3 of the dudes in Into Oblivion (a good friend used to be roommates with the guitarist) and those three also are in a band called Cromlech who also rule.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFBMRb9I6Io
Quote by NotFromANUS
"Don't brutal your sister, Timmy!"


last.fm
#17
I have very little motivation to check out new stuff, partially because I still have lots of albums that have only been given a couple listens, so they're still fresh for me.
#18
^ I'm sort of the same, I'm actually still working my way through a lot of the classics with newer stuff tossed in here and there. I also tend to become absorbed completely by an album when I find one I love. When I first heard None So Vile I listened to little else for an entire week. It sometimes makes my progress to new or different stuff very slow.
last.fm
"the waves have now a redder glow..."
#19
I went through a few years of listening to very little of anything new and got pretty disenchanted with the while metal scene in general.

I think it was a combination of not really hearing anything that stood out. There are a few bands lately that have grabbed my attention though.

But I suppose it's only natural that you enjoy the music from your earielr days more. I mean I love Korn, Deftones et all,but theres people who will scoff at those bands and point me towards earlier stuff. Same way as in 10 years people will be doing the same with today's bands.

It's just a big old cycle.
#20
Well, I think a lot of good thoughts went into your responses. I don't believe Jacob was the "voice of reason" because he posted an unrelated response. I don't think modern metal is awful or good, as much as I don't feel the need to explore metal as much as I once did. I did enjoy Into Oblivion and don't understand how they're considered pretentious.

Contrary to belief, there isn't a right or wrong answer. It was to understand why people listen to newer material or if they were content with what they have like I am. It is applicable to all genres like what has already been said, that's right.

I liked the scene mentions though, as I never thought about it like that. The new bands I hear feel more like one-offs but I can see the point being mentioned.

But I mean, it's not really important. Just wondering why people listen to newer music or if they were content with what they already have.
#21
I've had little time to really listen to much new stuff, but I think I check out newer things almost out of habit, if I do. However I find I'm going back to older bands, because the ideas were fresh, bands weren't afraid to experiment and because people wrote music to express a feeling or an atmosphere rather than pay homage to 6 million patches on their face. However I'm an optimist, so I guess I listen to new stuff to give it the benefit of the doubt at least - a chance to prove itself. Occasionally it pays off...

“Who are you then?.."
"- I am part of that power which eternally wills evil and eternally works good.”
KULTURKAMPF
lastFM
#22
Quote by RiffYourFaceOff
^ I'm sort of the same, I'm actually still working my way through a lot of the classics with newer stuff tossed in here and there. I also tend to become absorbed completely by an album when I find one I love. When I first heard None So Vile I listened to little else for an entire week. It sometimes makes my progress to new or different stuff very slow.

For quality pieces of work though, it behooves the listener to spend more than a cursory single listen to absorb the work. Slow and monotonous it may be, but ultimately I find the pay off worth it.
HESSIAN HAREM
FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF THE HESSIAN CULTURE. STAY TRUE.
#23
Listening to a record once and claiming you have "listened" to the album is like saying you saw a movie because it was on TV one time and you caught a few parts here and there in between commercials. I listen to the whole thing, let the air clear for 5-10 minutes and hit fucking repeat or flip that record. I spend a whole week listening to an album or two. Can't imagine doing it any other way. This also comes from my era where you got an album and it was all you had, no downloads or money for other stuff. So you span it like crazy and when you hated it, you truly HATED it!

But this discipline comes with treasures that will never befall many ears.
A heathen, conceivably
but not,

I hope,
I’m not ashamed to be white
Vi doede ikke... vi har aldri levd
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind
Civilization is unnatural

It is a whim of circumstance
an unenlightened one
#24
I listen, but not as much as i used to.

My main itunes library is full of every exceptional song I can find, 80% of them from before 2000, probably mostly 70s and 90s overall
#25
Quote by VampireGoldfish
Listening to a record once and claiming you have "listened" to the album is like saying you saw a movie because it was on TV one time and you caught a few parts here and there in between commercials.


not sure if i necessarily agree with this. I think if you're fully present during the listening experience and are fully immersed in the music without distractions then one listen should certainly be enough to constitute having 'listened' to the album. Sure, you'll keep noticing new things with each listen but I've certainly had times when I was focused and in it as hell for the first listen of an album and I don't see how that is at all like seeing parts of a movie on TV in between commercials. To me the musical equivalent of that would be hearing a few tracks from a record or skipping around back and forth and saying you've heard it.


I do get where you are coming from, though. I think too often these days as long as the album was playing in the same space as the listener then it is considered 'heard' and the person moves to the next one even though they may not have payed any attention to it whatsoever, but i think that's just how the majority of people consume media these days
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
#26
Quote by progbass
For quality pieces of work though, it behooves the listener to spend more than a cursory single listen to absorb the work. Slow and monotonous it may be, but ultimately I find the pay off worth it.


Quote by VampireGoldfish
I listen to the whole thing, let the air clear for 5-10 minutes and hit ****ing repeat or flip that record. I spend a whole week listening to an album or two. Can't imagine doing it any other way.


I definitely agree/identify with both of these points, I absolutely would prefer to be very familiar with a handful of records than have a passing recollection of a hundred.
last.fm
"the waves have now a redder glow..."
#27
Quote by romencer17
not sure if i necessarily agree with this. I think if you're fully present during the listening experience and are fully immersed in the music without distractions then one listen should certainly be enough to constitute having 'listened' to the album.


That first listen will be done and over before you know. Your ears spent more time tuning in than they did listening. My first listen is no way comparable to my 10th listen. My first week of listening to The Serpent & The Sphere was filled with disappointment and lack of enthusiasm. Only through the course of a month or so did I begin to tune in to the albums frequency and it started to make sense.

This has happened countless times. Hell, I'll revisit albums I never liked just to see if I still don't like it.
A heathen, conceivably
but not,

I hope,
I’m not ashamed to be white
Vi doede ikke... vi har aldri levd
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind
Civilization is unnatural

It is a whim of circumstance
an unenlightened one
#28
Quote by VampireGoldfish
Listening to a record once and claiming you have "listened" to the album is like saying you saw a movie because it was on TV one time and you caught a few parts here and there in between commercials. I listen to the whole thing, let the air clear for 5-10 minutes and hit fucking repeat or flip that record. I spend a whole week listening to an album or two. Can't imagine doing it any other way. This also comes from my era where you got an album and it was all you had, no downloads or money for other stuff. So you span it like crazy and when you hated it, you truly HATED it!

But this discipline comes with treasures that will never befall many ears.


Well put. It's a lot easier to find new things, but since there's no commitment there are plenty of cases where people just don't let the record absorb. I've been confined through some circumstances to about a quarter of my normal library, and it may have well been the best thing that happened.

On a further note, some of my favourite albums have come from absolutely hating them on first couple of listens or finding them initially dull. Conversely, I've also fallen out with some records via the same method...

“Who are you then?.."
"- I am part of that power which eternally wills evil and eternally works good.”
KULTURKAMPF
lastFM
#29
I just think it's more about the quality of listening than the quantity. Someone could listen to a record 10 times but that doesn't guarantee that they were paying any attention to it. Likewise, at least in my experience, i can listen to a record for the first time and be completely present for it the entire time without my attention wavering at all and really get it.

i certainly don't deny that further attentive listening won't have you notice even more little things, as it surely will. but I think it's a bit of a stretch to say that one listen can never be enough to be familiar with an album.
Free your mind and your ass will follow
The kingdom of heaven is within
Open up your funky mind and you can fly

Sumdeus
#30
I don't fully disagree with you Rome, I just find one listen to be unsatisfactory regardless of how attentive I am.

Regardless of how good the first shag with a woman is, I always feel the urge for more after some time has passed.
A heathen, conceivably
but not,

I hope,
I’m not ashamed to be white
Vi doede ikke... vi har aldri levd
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind
Civilization is unnatural

It is a whim of circumstance
an unenlightened one
Last edited by VampireGoldfish at Mar 10, 2015,
#31
Quote by VampireGoldfish
This has happened countless times. Hell, I'll revisit albums I never liked just to see if I still don't like it.


This has happened to me an innumerable amount of times, however, I attribute it slightly more to simply being in the right frame of mind for the album a lot of the time. An example I have of it is my first listen of The Red In The Sky Is Ours in which I couldn't care any less about it, but once I revisited it a few months down the line it clicked and I'm still finding neat things about it to this day(Still don't know what the **** that guitar is doing in Night Comes Blood Black, though ).
Last edited by Morphogenesis26 at Mar 10, 2015,
#32
Quote by VampireGoldfish
Listening to a record once and claiming you have "listened" to the album is like saying you saw a movie because it was on TV one time and you caught a few parts here and there in between commercials. I listen to the whole thing, let the air clear for 5-10 minutes and hit fucking repeat or flip that record. I spend a whole week listening to an album or two. Can't imagine doing it any other way. This also comes from my era where you got an album and it was all you had, no downloads or money for other stuff. So you span it like crazy and when you hated it, you truly HATED it!

But this discipline comes with treasures that will never befall many ears.

Part of me wants to just try this for a while to see what it's like.

I listen to the same albums frequently for weeks but I rarely give them a second listen on the same day. I have to love the shit out of the album already to do that. I've done that with like... Aura and I think a Jazz record recently, but beyond that I haven't done it for a while.
#33
I generally have 4-5 albums that go on repeat for a week. Your mileage may vary. Some albums beg to be paired with another; Recently for me a great example of this is A Merging to the Boundless and Hope Dies. They work so well together.
A heathen, conceivably
but not,

I hope,
I’m not ashamed to be white
Vi doede ikke... vi har aldri levd
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind
Civilization is unnatural

It is a whim of circumstance
an unenlightened one
#34
Yeah I'm gunna make an experiment out of this and see how it makes me feel. sometimes I feel like I'm just moving through albums just to say I listened to them, so I like this idea because it's reminding me to take the time and listen to them.
#35
Quote by Ironic Maiden
...sometimes I feel like I'm just moving through albums just to say I listened to them...


That's a bingo!
A heathen, conceivably
but not,

I hope,
I’m not ashamed to be white
Vi doede ikke... vi har aldri levd
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind
Civilization is unnatural

It is a whim of circumstance
an unenlightened one
#36
I remember approaching Obscura like it was a chore; the album was so hard to listen to and it just drains the life of you and it sounds just like dissonant noise at some points

But I stuck with it. I forced myself to listen to the whole thing, start to finish, multiple times. And man do I love it. I like to save it for special occasions, much like Burzum records.

Complex music such as that demands multiple listens, whereas simple minded music can be absorbed quite quickly in comparison.

But, that isn't to saysimple music is bad : Ildjarn wrote remarkably simple music that interacted in complex ways.
HESSIAN HAREM
FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF THE HESSIAN CULTURE. STAY TRUE.
#37
Quote by Ironic Maiden
Yeah I'm gunna make an experiment out of this and see how it makes me feel. sometimes I feel like I'm just moving through albums just to say I listened to them, so I like this idea because it's reminding me to take the time and listen to them.


I'm definitely thinking about doing this too. I often catch myself doing exactly what you described Ironic. Some of the albums I love the most (Any Rome album, NeO albums, etc.) are the albums I listened to ad nausem, and I still discover new things after the nth listen. I have been trying to listen to the same album on my drives everyday in the car (Enslaved recently), but the problem is I have to cut my listening short because I'm driving to work, etc.
Quote by Senor Kristian
Viking fact no. 1: Viking helmets did not have horn.
Viking fact no. 2: Vikings tobogganed on their shields into battle.
Viking fact no. 3: Vikings drank mead.
Viking fact no. 4: One of your ancestors are likely to have been raped by a viking.
#38
Some real life relevance here, I was talking to my chemistry teacher because I noticed he was wearing a King Crimson sweater. So I asked him about it, which then turned into a conversation about the authenticity of bands now compared to the 1970s.

Anyways he was also talking about how he used to listen to albums for hours upon hours. Just listening and enjoying them without distraction and with friends, and then he would sit around more and discuss them. He mentioned you just don't see that thing nowadays.

I couldn't disagree being someone who writes a lot of music off if I didn't like it the first time. Case in point were Autopsy for me. I eventually listened to Mental Funeral all week and learned to enjoy it. I understand where everyone was coming from when they spoke so highly about Mental Funeral.

Anyways, he and I agreed that accessibility is a blessing and a plague. Anyways it was pretty rad to hear about him talk about how much he enjoyed the music because he put in the effort. The same could be said about mostly everything, except for Chemistry, which makes it ironic in a way.
#39
I didn't realize how many times I said anyways. I say it a lot in my day to day life. I cannot be bothered with fixing it from my phone.
#40
I think the idea that you have to put in some kind of effort to enjoy some albums is a very interesting phenomenon. Most people I know consider music to be something you put on to relax or drift away from life in some way or another, yet the people I know who take music very seriously almost always mention this idea of somehow "forcing" yourself to like an album. I guess we don't tend to think about music as something you have to unravel or engage with critically like we would a film or a book, but I think this is very much the case with certain albums. Morph mentioned TRITSIO, and I felt exactly the same way when I first heard that album, but eventually the album clicked after enough time and effort.

I just find it interesting that there are some albums that you just don't understand in someway the first time you listen to them, yet they can still yield rewards if you continue to listen even if you were unimpressed or displeased at first.
Quote by Senor Kristian
Viking fact no. 1: Viking helmets did not have horn.
Viking fact no. 2: Vikings tobogganed on their shields into battle.
Viking fact no. 3: Vikings drank mead.
Viking fact no. 4: One of your ancestors are likely to have been raped by a viking.
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