#1
I posted this on imgur and I got advised that the lacquer that i "need" to use will yellow the guitar and I'll end up with a green guitar.
Huh? I don't understand. I thought i could use a clear gloss. Was he trying to tell me that i need to use something specific? i'm confused.


#3
Don't use nitrocellulose lacquer -- it will yellow over time and "green" that color. A lot of Pelham blue guitars ended up Inverness Green that way. Car manufacturers in the early 50's dumped nitrocellulose lacquer for this very reason.



A good polyurethane or acrylic clear will prevent that.
#4
Oh okay. I gotcha.

I was playing around with a few polys and I came up with a combination of water and oil bases that looks pretty good. I'm not planning to use nitro.
Thanks!
#6
Quote by Explorerbuilder
Polys will yellow dramatically as well. The waterbased has a blue tint, so that wont be a problem. But oil based will always yellow.


Not all "polys" are the same. The current batch of polyesters, for example, will never yellow, and are dead clear. There are a kajillion formulations of water-base paint out there, all of which qualify for a "poly" prefix. I've got guitars from the '70's that were cleared with some cross-linked whatever clear, and they're as crispy clear as they day they were painted. Some polywhosis things yellowed. But those aren't used much these days.
#7
Quote by dspellman
Not all "polys" are the same. The current batch of polyesters, for example, will never yellow, and are dead clear. There are a kajillion formulations of water-base paint out there, all of which qualify for a "poly" prefix. I've got guitars from the '70's that were cleared with some cross-linked whatever clear, and they're as crispy clear as they day they were painted. Some polywhosis things yellowed. But those aren't used much these days.

"poly" is a very relative term.
Polyester is good stuff, what htey use in factories.
I was referring to polyurethane, which is what most off the shelf wood finishes are. They already have an amber tint and yellow quickly.
#8


It's working so far. This is with min-wax oil based polyurethane on top of a water based poly of "i forget what brand".
I don't really know what I'm doing but I like the way it's going so far.

So - how do I get the rest of the way to that "wet" look?
#10
I can understand where issues arise if someone is using a form of hardware store polyurethane yacht varnish, but wonder why cellulose lacquer isn't favoured? It is readily available in spray cans and, I assume from car use, is light stable.
Please note: The above comments are based on my experience, and may represent my perception of that experience. This may not be accurate and, subject to the style of music you play, may be irrelevant or wrong.
#12
I sanded the minwax out and went back to the water based poly. It's taking a lot longer. I am not good at this at all. The sanding did lighten the carved edges a bit and the process in general has created some areas that are lighter or darker than the average. I actually like it. It's starting to make me think "sapphire".
#13
I am further along. I've been struggling with this water based poly but I finally created a halfway decent coat. The pictures were taken before it was finished curing so it might still get better than this, but I thought I could ask some general questions anyways.

What to do about an "orange peel" texture? What about dust particles? Can I use a 3-aught scratch pad?
What about buffing? Should I scuff this coat up and apply one more?
I can't tell you how many coats are on it because I've sanded down and wiped on at least . I would say at least 20 or 30 coats.
But it's not super thick because i keep removing the bad coats too.



#15
Quote by John Sims
I can understand where issues arise if someone is using a form of hardware store polyurethane yacht varnish, but wonder why cellulose lacquer isn't favoured? It is readily available in spray cans and, I assume from car use, is light stable.


Nitrocellulose lacquer (if we're thinking of the same cans) is the same for both cars and guitars. It's never been UV stable, and that's part of the reason why it's not used for cars (production cars, anyway) and hasn't been for the last half century or so. It turns yellow, cracks, checks, chalks up, and reveals any imperfections from the surface below it. Used to drive hotrodders crazy; they'd have these gorgeous cars with 30 coats of hand-rubbed lacquer and they'd take off a mirror and find the original color underneath was different from the current color...


Both Fender and Gibson used the same *acrylic* car paints back around the time Firebirds were introduced, and Gibson changed the names of a few of the metallics to "poly" (a bit ironic) to avoid having exactly the same thing as Fender. Most of these acrylic paints were used for the color layer, and Gibson cleared them with nitrocellulose lacquer, which is why you see yellowed top layers that have been worn off to reveal some of the original acrylic color layers underneath.
#16
I handn't related cellulose and nitrocellulose as one and the same...you live and learn.

I also hadn't appreciated there were such significant controls on cellulose sprays in the UK for car finishing. Years ago that's all we used when spraying over repaired rust holes. It was a right pain when it reacted with the original paint...happy days.
Please note: The above comments are based on my experience, and may represent my perception of that experience. This may not be accurate and, subject to the style of music you play, may be irrelevant or wrong.
#17
If you want a perfect gloss on anything, use a urethane based clear spray. Thin coats, 3-5 layers thick. Pay attention to flash time. Flash is the waiting period between coats. Usually 20 minutes or so. Let it cure somewhere with low humidity and mid 60s Fahrenheit. Give it 2 weeks to really set. Take some 1000 grit sand paper and wet sand lightly. Just enough to dull the finish. Use distilled water for wetting the paper. Wash your guitar down in distilled water. Let it dry. Now use an ultra fine polish compound and buff it to a shine.

You will have a super smooth glass like finish.
#18
Quote by highgear
If you want a perfect gloss on anything, use a urethane based clear spray. Thin coats, 3-5 layers thick. Pay attention to flash time. Flash is the waiting period between coats. Usually 20 minutes or so. Let it cure somewhere with low humidity and mid 60s Fahrenheit. Give it 2 weeks to really set. Take some 1000 grit sand paper and wet sand lightly. Just enough to dull the finish. Use distilled water for wetting the paper. Wash your guitar down in distilled water. Let it dry. Now use an ultra fine polish compound and buff it to a shine.

You will have a super smooth glass like finish.


That's do-able. Thanks for the advice.