#1
I should say first and foremost that I'm a left handed player, so I don't get to play many guitars.

I was thinking about the ideal fretboard feel, and I was imagining a soft wood with a little "give." Has anyone had any experience with a type of fretboard wood, specific board or neck that has some "give" to it? Does this type of thing even exist?

I imagine it wouldn't be great for the instrument if the fretboard wood was able to be indented. Am I imagining something else here--for example, is this how a scalloped fretboard feels?

Ideally, the string isn't supposed to actually touch the wood of the fretboard, right?
#2
Oof, no. Anything soft enough to give when you fret is not going to hold the frets in properly. If you want something to feel scalloped, get extra jumbo frets or scallop the board.

Even stuff like Rosewood can get divots in it if you play super hard and grind your fingers/strings into the board. It's not common but it does happen. Ideally, yes, the strings should never touch the board but that doesn't mean the board doesn't have structural requirements. Anything so soft it compresses under your fingers is not a viable fretboard material.
#3
Quote by Roc8995
Oof, no. Anything soft enough to give when you fret is not going to hold the frets in properly. If you want something to feel scalloped, get extra jumbo frets or scallop the board.

Even stuff like Rosewood can get divots in it if you play super hard and grind your fingers/strings into the board. It's not common but it does happen. Ideally, yes, the strings should never touch the board but that doesn't mean the board doesn't have structural requirements. Anything so soft it compresses under your fingers is not a viable fretboard material.



Ahh, okay thanks Roc, that's kind of what I figured. In your experience, does playing super jumbo frets or a scalloped board give you the feeling I was describing?
#4
Depends on what you mean by "give" - if the strings have too much give you're pulling the notes sharp. Nothing is going to give you the "backstop" of a board but also a feeling of "give" at the same time. But yes, scalloping lets you fret a note and still have some space under it, so your finger touches nothing but the strings, and for vibrato or bends you can dig in more. Is that what you mean by 'give'?

Big enough frets (6100, 6000) do feel scalloped to some extent. It depends on how heavy you are with your fretting hand. I think for most people those big frets are close enough to a scalloped feel. Again, be careful with how much clearance between fret and board you have - if you use light strings or have a strong fretting hand technique you are going to pull notes out of tune.
#5
Hmm. Okay. I have a '13 American Strat, so the frets are probably not very jumbo on those. I use 10's and I think my fretting touch is about average. I'm wondering mostly for legato playing. It seems like more "give" would make it easier to play legato. I feel like when I'm playing on my strat, there's a lot of "push back" if that makes sense. Sorry, it's kind of hard to explain.
#6
Do you mean the drag from hitting the fretboard with your fingertips?

If so, that's exactly what large frets and scalloping are meant to combat. You only touch the strings so there's less drag/friction, especially when bending.
#7
There's no point, and I'd hate it. The string isn't suppose to touch the fretboard, and I'd definitely prefer NOT to have something that would catch my finger (ebony is my favorite). That's the direct opposite of something that would allow you to play fast.
#8
Quote by Roc8995
Do you mean the drag from hitting the fretboard with your fingertips?

If so, that's exactly what large frets and scalloping are meant to combat. You only touch the strings so there's less drag/friction, especially when bending.



Yes, absolutely. Maybe I should look into having jumbo frets put onto my strat.
#9
technique can be altered to avoid touching the board. some times its good to softy fret and times to dig in, but you really shouldn't touch the fretboard.

i play usa teles and ibanez prestiges mostly (very different on paper) but by playing more tactfully it makes the fret size not matter as much. adjust your touch and that will be the best.

Edit for typo, shouldn't replaced should.
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Last edited by trashedlostfdup at Mar 5, 2015,
#10
A refret might be too costly for a squire. For the upgrade expense and a trade in you could find a much better used guitar with jumbo frets.
#11
Quote by trashedlostfdup
technique can be altered to avoid touching the board. some times its good to softy fret and times to dig in, but you really should touch the fretboard.

i play usa teles and ibanez prestiges mostly (very different on paper) but by playing more tactfully it makes the fret size not matter as much. adjust your touch and that will be the best.


agree. my strat is older and has the smaller frets while my BC Rich has jumbo frets. only takes a second when going between them to adjust because i play with a fairly light touch. you don't need a death grip on the neck and you'll be able to play faster and more precisely if you learn to use less pressure when fretting.
#12
Quote by OroborosYinYang
A refret might be too costly for a squire. For the upgrade expense and a trade in you could find a much better used guitar with jumbo frets.


The OP said he had a 2013 American Start not a Squire
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#13
The OP said he had a 2013 American Start not a Squire [/QUOTE

still be expensive. as i recall strats from that year have taller frets than strats previously had. while not jumbo they are reasonably high.
#14
i dont understand why you would want that. try playing guitars with small and large frets. try playing guitars with very large and small neck radius. try different materials. those things all combined can be drastically different.

if you press down too hard, the strings will go slightly out of pitch. a lot of people thing higher frets requires a lighter touch because there is more potential to push down too far. feel is another. some like the feel closer to the fretboard or like to feel some of the fretboard wood when they dig in.

i know many literally saying its against, science, but i do think the material has a very minute tonal difference. i just cant get rosewood boards to "pop" like maple ones. i just cant!
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#15
Quote by Evilnine
The OP said he had a 2013 American Start not a Squire

Shit, no idea why my mind filled that in. I'll just go sit in the corner and think about what I've done....
#16
Quote by ikey_
i dont understand why you would want that. try playing guitars with small and large frets. try playing guitars with very large and small neck radius. try different materials. those things all combined can be drastically different.

if you press down too hard, the strings will go slightly out of pitch. a lot of people thing higher frets requires a lighter touch because there is more potential to push down too far. feel is another. some like the feel closer to the fretboard or like to feel some of the fretboard wood when they dig in.

i know many literally saying its against, science, but i do think the material has a very minute tonal difference. i just cant get rosewood boards to "pop" like maple ones. i just cant!


I wish. I'm a lefty. I guess I could get kind of an idea on personal preference from flipping a righty but it's not really the same, especially considering I'm looking for a professional instrument and the $ involved.
#17
Quote by RyanMW2010
I wish. I'm a lefty. I guess I could get kind of an idea on personal preference from flipping a righty but it's not really the same, especially considering I'm looking for a professional instrument and the $ involved.

don't know how long you've been playing but have you considered going rightie? i'm a leftie to but if you think it's rough now finding leftie guitars try having to do that back in the late 70s. i played leftie on flipped guitars for a little over a year and finally said screw this and started from scratch right handed. took very little time to get back up to speed and honestly made way more progress. just a thought.
#18
Quote by monwobobbo
don't know how long you've been playing but have you considered going rightie? i'm a leftie to but if you think it's rough now finding leftie guitars try having to do that back in the late 70s. i played leftie on flipped guitars for a little over a year and finally said screw this and started from scratch right handed. took very little time to get back up to speed and honestly made way more progress. just a thought.


20 years this year. I still consider it from time to time. I love guitars so much and it hurts me...but I don't know. I'm sure it would take a few years to reach my current level of proficiency if i switched--I'm just not sure how long exactly or if it would end up being worth it.
#19
Quote by RyanMW2010
20 years this year. I still consider it from time to time. I love guitars so much and it hurts me...but I don't know. I'm sure it would take a few years to reach my current level of proficiency if i switched--I'm just not sure how long exactly or if it would end up being worth it.

20 years in is a long time. just a though but maybe pickup a cheap rightie guitar and give a try. don't even bother plugging in just get used to playing the other way. who knows maybe you'll be ableto play with either hand in time. in terms of actual playing probably not much different. in terms of actually being able to play the majority of guitars out there it may be well worth it.
#20
carvin would be a worth looking into. you get to go for your specs, and lefty is an option.
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Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/