#1
Okok so I got a 2nd hand Apogee Duet and I want to add a mic to it. There's 2 "beginner" mics I'm looking at but haven't really decided which direction I want to go first:

  • SM58 (vocal mic that apparently turns into a SM57 if I take the windscreen off) retailing for about $130
  • Avantone CK-6 @ $195 (a shop giving a good discount from $242)
  • Rode NT-1 (although I heard from a friend they break easily? Dunno if that's true)


Now for me, I use VSTs for my guitar and line in for my upright piano. My reasoning for getting the SM58 is I can mic up my amp (Roland Street Cube) or use it as a vocal so it's versatile in that respect. However Avantone, though can only be used for vocals and possibly piano (for now) is a pretty reputable brand for large condenser mics but of course you all know that.

Obviously in time I will probably get both (SM58 + Condenser Mic) but which do you guys think is more of a priority? Is there any thoughts on the CK-6? Maybe save up for the CK-7 cuz it can change polar patterns (or is that not too necessary)?

(Further note: I don't have room treatment as I live in an apartment though I could consider buying an acoustishield from sE or similar)
Last edited by ThatGuy_17 at Mar 7, 2015,
#3
Mics are just tools for making music. Choose the best one for the job so get very real about what you need a mic to do and that will narrow your choices.

I am a fan of the Rode condenser mics cause they offer a lot of bang for the buck. They are fragile as all large diaphragm condensers are, compared with dynamic mics so they would be used studio only and never see a live gig. Vocals, acoustic piano, strings, acoustic guitar, overhead drums.

Dynamic mics are workhorses that have uses everywhere including studio and live work. An SM58 could be dropped from a 3 story building and probably still work. Extremely rugged. If you have limited funds and need mics to do multi purpose, get these. You can never have too many good quality dynamic mics. Vocals, drum mics, guitar amps,

Remember too that unless you have mad recording skills acquired while working with Quincy Jones, you are not going to make a top selling album in your home project studio. You can make excellent demo recordings and refine your songs and skills over time but when you are ready for the big time effort, take it to a studio that has been there-done that for your best shot at success.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#4
Quote by ThatGuy_17
Now for me, I use VSTs for my guitar and line in for my upright piano.
What kinda upright piano has a line out?
Better yet, what piano do you own exactly?
Quote by ThatGuy_17
My reasoning for getting the SM58 is I can mic up my amp (Roland Street Cube)
Your amp's not good enough to be worth micing, stick to amp sims.
Also possibly get better amp sims.
Quote by ThatGuy_17
However Avantone, though can only be used for vocals and possibly piano (for now) is a pretty reputable brand for large condenser mics
The CV-12 is famous for having been the choice of Tay Swift's engineer for the recording of red, but while it is a good sounding mic the brand doesn't live up to the hype if ya ask me.
Quote by ThatGuy_17
(Further note: I don't have room treatment as I live in an apartment though I could consider buying an acoustishield from sE or similar)
If you want to record a piano and you're planning on using condenser mics you'll want some acoustic treatment at least.

How much money do you wanna spend on the mic and what are all the things you wanna record exactly?
Quote by Cajundaddy
Remember too that unless you have mad recording skills acquired while working with Quincy Jones, you are not going to make a top selling album in your home project studio.
Damien rice did it.
GOTYE did it.

Just a couple off the top of my head.

Though I agree while it's a drastic way of putting it, listen to this guy TS - without experience you'll not be able to make stuff sound that good, whatever the stuff you're thinking about is.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
Last edited by Spambot_2 at Mar 7, 2015,
#5
I'd say Damien Rice has "mad skills" acquired while working with top engineers in pro studios for 15 years. Making a top selling album without a major label is certainly possible. Making your first top selling album in a home project studio without mad skills or vast recording experience is a pipe dream.

Here is a recording that was finished last year without major label/major studio support but definitely had top recording talent in this home studio. I sat in on a few sessions and it was great watching these pros at work:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDkfpexp5ek

Ted Pearce- Songwriter, vocals, friend
Wendy Waldman- Producer (Vanessa Williams, Dirt Band)
Rob Hoffman- Engineer (Quincy Jones, Christina Aguilera)
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Mar 7, 2015,
#6
Quote by Cajundaddy
I'd say Damien Rice has "mad skills" acquired while working with top engineers in pro studios for 15 years. Making a top selling album without a major label is certainly possible. Making a top selling album in a home project studio without mad skills or vast recording experience is a pipe dream.
Are we talking about the same Damien Rice?

"O" was recorded in different houses around Europe with a mid-end 8 (or was it 16?) track recorder and some decent mics, all borrowed, and some advice from a no-name studio engineer he was a friend of.

Again, I agree for the most part but your way of putting it is too drastic,
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#7
Quote by Spambot_2
Are we talking about the same Damien Rice?

"O" was recorded in different houses around Europe with a mid-end 8 (or was it 16?) track recorder and some decent mics, all borrowed, and some advice from a no-name studio engineer he was a friend of.

Again, I agree for the most part but your way of putting it is too drastic,


Yep, Damien Rice = Mad skills. One in 10 million. With mad skills the number of tracks or houses used to record are irrelevant. Les Paul recorded with Mary Ford in the back seat of his car without the use of multitrack. Also mad skills.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#8
I use an SM57 for my guitar amp at church. The SM57 and SM58 are fairly similar - I own both. I normally play electric guitar, so the 57 works great. We're doing a song with an acoustic guitar and a resonator tomorrow, so both guitars will have condenser mics on them. Just keep condensers away from dusty conditions and you'll be fine. They're not nearly as fragile as ribbon mics. Ribbons and condensers can easily be used in live gigs.

If you buy a 57 or 58, it can be used for your cab and vocals. They're not much good for tracking acoustic guitars, though. There are far better mics for that purpose. For what it's worth, the 57 and 58 are workhorse mics. These mics have been around for years and many professional musicians and recording engineers use them.

I'm not a big fan of Behringer, but if you're tight on dosh, they make some inexpensive mics that will get you by.
#9
Quote by Spambot_2
What kinda upright piano has a line out?
Better yet, what piano do you own exactly?

The piano is a yamaha fitted with a silent box underneath so I can play at night without annoying anyone. The silent box has 2 headphone outputs, which I use to connect to the Apogee. If I really need to, I'll go to church and sneakily use their Nord's and Roland RD-700 for better quality piano sounds

Quote by Spambot_2
Your amp's not good enough to be worth micing, stick to amp sims.
Also possibly get better amp sims.

Yea, amp sim wise I'll probably stick to the Garageband one's as I think they're quite decent; will probably need to check out LePou's stuff on the sticky one of these days.

Quote by Spambot_2
The CV-12 is famous for having been the choice of Tay Swift's engineer for the recording of red, but while it is a good sounding mic the brand doesn't live up to the hype if ya ask me.

How much money do you wanna spend on the mic and what are all the things you wanna record exactly?

In that case I'll decide between the CK-6 and NT-1. Both are good but currently, the CK-6 is discounted at $195 while the NT-1 is still $362 but there aren't many reviews on the Avantone. I'll primarily use it for vocals and maybe an acoustic if I need to. Will get the reflexion filter to have the "bare minimum" on the acoustic treatment for the mic.

Budget wise I'm honestly looking at you guys for some expertise. If you recall awhile back I also posted a new thread about getting the Focal CMS 40's awhile back so I'm also saving up for that.

Quote by KG6_Steven
If you buy a 57 or 58, it can be used for your cab and vocals. They're not much good for tracking acoustic guitars, though. There are far better mics for that purpose. For what it's worth, the 57 and 58 are workhorse mics. These mics have been around for years and many professional musicians and recording engineers use them.

I hear what you're saying so I was always going to get one. Just trying to prioritise at the moment but it seems Spambot is saying that amp sims seems to be the way to go as my amp is not the greatest, which I will agree 100%!
Last edited by ThatGuy_17 at Mar 8, 2015,
#10
I have a number of decent condenser mics but I never think of them as rugged in the first place as I don't use them for anything but home studio work. I did buy a few MXL condensers that run under $100.00 each for some live recording situations but I generally use SM58 and SM 57 mics live gig recordings.

In my opinion the Rode NT-1 is a great mic for the price but apparently they are a lot cheaper in the US ($230.00 range) and come with a nice spider cage and pop screen. I own two older original ones that I have had for about 15 years and they never leave the home studio. Even so I can't imagine why anyone would think they "break easily". They are well made and heavy but don't seem fragile at all.

On the low bargain side I like the M-Audio Nova condenser mic. It's a good all around condenser mic. I don't think they make them anymore but they do show up occasionally on EBay for less than $100.00.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.