#1
Hey guys, I have a 2i4 running into my iPad and I monitor with ATH M50x's. I run Audiobus with an amp sim (Bias) and into Garage Band to record. I play guitar.

1) What are some of the things I'm missing out from PC recording? I just don't have a need to drop a few hundred on software yet so for now I'm keeping it small.

2) In "behind the scenes" studio videos, I NEVER see any guitarists micing up their amps. Is there a certain popular amp sim they all use? I have yet to find an amp sim that sounds as good as a lot of guitar parts I hear. I listen to a lot of rock/punk like A Day To Remember, Three Days Grace, Breaking Benjamin, Four Year Strong etc.

3) Is there any easy way to double track besides slightly shifting a duplicate's start point? I find it difficult to play complicated rhythm spot on with each other and it has a delay effect.
#2
1. extensive audio editing, third party audio plugins, comprehensive midi functions, high quality virtual instruments, more processing power for potentially better fx processors, a hell of a lot more functions, more comprehensive audio routing, easy audio transfers between computers, ease of backupping stuff...

2. that's because guitarists usually don't play in the same room the amp is in.
That is to reduce noise picked up by the mic, EM interference between the amp and the p/ups, feedback, for ease of monitoring, for ease of turning stuff up without hurting ears and so on.

Also nowadays they're usually recorded clean for the recording to be reamped later.

They don't really use amp sims in big studios, for two reasons.
The first is marketing - guitarists usually shiver at the idea of paying for a studio recording and then knowing their sound is passing through an amp sim.
The second one is strictly practical - real amps potentially sound better, and in studios they usually have the gear and facilities and experience to make them sound better.

What you're missing from your playing is mixing - guitar parts in modern recordings are double tracked, reamped 10 times to find the most appropriate sound possible for the application, and then they're mixed with the rest.
You on the other hand are playing through a mono setup I'm guessing, and that's the end of the story.

Bias doesn't sound much good if ya ask me though, so you may have better luck with a good sounding amp sim.
What sims have you tried?

3. slightly shifting a duplicate's start point is not double tracking.
By definition, double tracking means tracking (aka recording) something two times.
The solution to that is practicing, no more no less.

What do you mean it has a delay effect though?
Name's Luca.

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#3
Quote by Spambot_2

They don't really use amp sims in big studios, for two reasons.


they do,
Motionless in white used pod farm for their guitar sound.
Don't ask me why, but the producer that recorded an album told that he didn't use real amps for it because the pod farm sound worked perfectly

I can't really answer question 1

2) With amplitube it is possible to recreate those sounds. But It takes a lot of time tweaking.

3)that is not they way that you should double track.

You should practice your parts and practice them with a metronome.
#4
Quote by jaspervdv
they do,
Motionless in white used pod farm for their guitar sound.
Don't ask me why, but the producer that recorded an album told that he didn't use real amps for it because the pod farm sound worked perfectly

I can't really answer question 1

2) With amplitube it is possible to recreate those sounds. But It takes a lot of time tweaking.

3)that is not they way that you should double track.

You should practice your parts and practice them with a metronome.

Joey Sturgis used Pod Farm as well on numerous albums. And I think Cameron Mizell might have used some Lepou sims on The Hollow album by Memphis May Fire. Is it possible? Yes. Do most have the knowledge on how to get the most out of an amp sim? Not really.
#5
Quote by Spambot_2
They don't really use amp sims in big studios, for two reasons.
The first is marketing - guitarists usually shiver at the idea of paying for a studio recording and then knowing their sound is passing through an amp sim.
The second one is strictly practical - real amps potentially sound better, and in studios they usually have the gear and facilities and experience to make them sound better.


Can you cite some sources for that information? You also state that real amps potentially sound better. I would have agreed with you a few years ago, but some of the modeling amps they're making now sound nearly spot on. The average consumer buying a CD from the local music store will never know the difference. Personally, I think there are several benefits to using modeling amps.

Have a look at the Kemper Profiling Amp. Of course, it's not the only option out there.
#6
Quote by Spambot_2
1. extensive audio editing, third party audio plugins, comprehensive midi functions, high quality virtual instruments, more processing power for potentially better fx processors, a hell of a lot more functions, more comprehensive audio routing, easy audio transfers between computers, ease of backupping stuff...

2. that's because guitarists usually don't play in the same room the amp is in.
That is to reduce noise picked up by the mic, EM interference between the amp and the p/ups, feedback, for ease of monitoring, for ease of turning stuff up without hurting ears and so on.

Also nowadays they're usually recorded clean for the recording to be reamped later.

They don't really use amp sims in big studios, for two reasons.
The first is marketing - guitarists usually shiver at the idea of paying for a studio recording and then knowing their sound is passing through an amp sim.
The second one is strictly practical - real amps potentially sound better, and in studios they usually have the gear and facilities and experience to make them sound better.

What you're missing from your playing is mixing - guitar parts in modern recordings are double tracked, reamped 10 times to find the most appropriate sound possible for the application, and then they're mixed with the rest.
You on the other hand are playing through a mono setup I'm guessing, and that's the end of the story.

Bias doesn't sound much good if ya ask me though, so you may have better luck with a good sounding amp sim.
What sims have you tried?

3. slightly shifting a duplicate's start point is not double tracking.
By definition, double tracking means tracking (aka recording) something two times.
The solution to that is practicing, no more no less.

What do you mean it has a delay effect though?


Thanks for the extensive answers. I've ran the trial of Amplitube but I don't have the cash to drop $200 on an amp sim. I've tried a few free plugins but those seem to be worse than any iOS app I've tried.
#7
Quote by The Bacon Man
Thanks for the extensive answers. I've ran the trial of Amplitube but I don't have the cash to drop $200 on an amp sim. I've tried a few free plugins but those seem to be worse than any iOS app I've tried.


you used them with an impulse loader right?
because most free ones come without one
#8
Quote by jaspervdv
you used them with an impulse loader right?
because most free ones come without one


Yeah, still didn't like them.
#9
Quote by The Bacon Man

1) What are some of the things I'm missing out from PC recording? I just don't have a need to drop a few hundred on software yet so for now I'm keeping it small.


Possibly real amp miking and recording through a better quality audio interface, although there are some interfaces that work on iPad nowadays. I don't think you can still beat that.


Quote by The Bacon Man

2) In "behind the scenes" studio videos, I NEVER see any guitarists micing up their amps. Is there a certain popular amp sim they all use? I have yet to find an amp sim that sounds as good as a lot of guitar parts I hear. I listen to a lot of rock/punk like A Day To Remember, Three Days Grace, Breaking Benjamin, Four Year Strong etc.

Usually a lot of these sounds are achieved with several high end mics, say SM57, Royer ribbon and a Neumann Condenser (U87, or U47, etc.) running through a few preamps that go through a signal chain that is probably more expensive than your house. There are some popular sims, and some hardware modelers like Kemper, Axe, etc.


Quote by The Bacon Man

3) Is there any easy way to double track besides slightly shifting a duplicate's start point? I find it difficult to play complicated rhythm spot on with each other and it has a delay effect.

You'll just have to get better at it.