#1
Recently I've been toying with the idea of selling my PRS SE Custom 24. It's a beautiful guitar but doesn't really 'speak' to me in the way my last one did. Because I love my Les Paul Studio so much, I thought I'd change it for a Gibson SG, either the 60's Tribute or Special version. Unfortunately, when I played them I was hugely disappointed. They played well enough and sounded good but they didn't strike me as inspiring. My Les Paul Studio is a 'cheaper' Gibson and it's incredible for the money. It feels like a quality guitar in a way that the SG options just didn't. I was very disappointed in them for sure. I was all set to just keep the PRS until I tried an EVH Wolfgang Special and that one really did speak to me. It's a beautiful guitar. It's a shame the whammy will only move downwards but I don't suppose that's the end of the world and despite the locking trem, it doesn't look an obviously 'shredders' guitar, which appeals to me as I'm in no way a shredder.

http://www.richtonemusic.co.uk/products/evh_wolfgang_special_maple_fingerboard_burnt_cherry_burst.asp

You'd think that was it, decision made, but the Sterling JP100D also looks appealing. Unfortunately, the shop didn't have any in stock and nobody else I can find is stocking them either so it's impossible to try.

http://www.richtonemusic.co.uk/products/sterling_by_music_man_jp100d_john_petrucci_ruby_red_burst.asp

Has anybody tried both and can tell me what they're like in comparison to each other?
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
#2
It really depends on what you want and the sound that you're looking for.

I'm not 100% sure of this, but since the Wolfgang has a maple fingerboard, I suppose the sound will be brighter, whilst the Sterling will have a warmer tone, since it has a rosewood fingerboard.

The Wolfgang has a Floyd Rose. If you don't mind having to spend some time setting up a Floyd Rose or dealing with its problems that can eventually appear, and you want to have some whammy bar fun, you will benefit a lot from it.

It also a compound radius, which in my opinion helps a lot with your playing. They feel very comfortable to me. The Sterling has a 16 radius, if you're doing lots of chords, probably it won't be very comfortable, but that comes down to personal opinion. Since you are not a shredder, you may not benefit from this.

Other difference is the number of frets. The Sterling has 24 while the Wolfgang has 22, so you will have to see how many frets you need.

Personally I would go for the Wolfgang, just because of the Floyd Rose and the compound radius. I prefer rosewood or ebony fingerboards, but I could live with a maple one just as fine.

Check this thread too if you haven't, they are talking about the Wolfgang: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1671963

Edit: Just noticed that the whammy only moves down. Nevermind what I said about the Floyd Rose!
Last edited by DanyFS at Mar 8, 2015,
#3
the Sterling JP100 is a really nice guitar. if you are a Petrucci fan then i'd take that over the wolfgang. from you post i'm guessing that isn't your first consideration though. personally i prefer non locking trems (after years of playing floyds) and since your PRS has a non locking trem that is a consideration. in terms of feel the Sterling will be closer. having said that the wolfgang is an excellent guitar so you can't really lose either way.

not being able to play a guitar first is somehting i'd think about to. you said you didn't bond with the PRS so i'd ask myself why and factor that into any decision made.
#4
I don't know why I didn't bond with it as I used to have two of them and I loved the other one but this one has just never felt as good. Anyway, I've sold it now so one way or another I'm getting a new guitar! I've given up on the JP100D as I'm just not spending that kind of money on something I can't try first so I had it down to a different two. One is the EVH Wolfgang Special and the other was a Fender Standard Stratocaster Plus Top with Floyd Rose.

The stock pickups on the Fender are certainly awful, hence I would use the Classic '83 pups I have at the moment. The other guitarist in my band is a mad keen Fender man and he insists the Fender would have a wider market and a better resale value but I'm just not convinced. Fender buyers aren't usually that fussed about fancy tops and aren't usually bothered about Floyd Rose bridges so at £600, it seems to me that I'd have a guitar that's either £200 more than a normal Mexican HSS Strat or a Strat that isn't a kick in the teeth away from the price of an American Strat. As a result, this model would inevitably get squeezed, which is probably why shops don't stock them but I accept that the EVH is perhaps quite a specialised market too. The thing is, try as I might I can't find anything that I'd prefer when I think of the specification I'm after:

1) Around the £600-£700 price bracket, though I'd happily have something a bit cheaper.

2) I'd prefer a trem unit and an OFR would be nice, though not a deal breaker but if it has a locking trem system, it needs to be a good one. I don't want a licensed Floyd or a 'Special' Floyd system. It has to be either OFR or an equivalent that's as good.

3) Either HH or HSH configuration.

4) Not an obviously shredding guitar.

5) A maple fretboard would be nice but again, not a deal breaker.

6) At least one volume and one tone control.

Any other ideas?
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
#5
My signature might blow my preferences, but a Jackson Pro or a Charvel Pro Mod might be interesting too. They fit the price range, they have original Floyds and Seymour Duncan pickups, and have very comfortable compound radius necks.

A Charvel certainly doesn't look like a shredding guitar, it just looks like a HH Fender Strat with a Floyd. The So-Cal is pretty shred-heavy thanks to the Distortion pickups, but the San Dimas has the popular and more versatile JB/59 pickup combo. Sadly, downside for you: no tone knob.

http://www.richtonemusic.co.uk/products/charvel_pro_mod_san_dimas_electric_guitar_black-char292-6000-803.asp

Jackson Dinky/Soloist models have a superstrat look, although not over the top, and not more so than the Sterling you posted imo. They also have tone knobs and some (only Dinkies if I'm not mistaken) have 5-way switches that include two coil split settings.

http://www.richtonemusic.co.uk/products/jackson_dk2mq_pro_series_dinky_trans_black.asp

The EVH Wolfgang has that D-Tuna system, with the supposed advantage of very quick and easy drop-tuning (painful with regular Floyds), and easier setup/restringing/tuning because it can't bend upwards. But I haven't tried that myself. Downside: it can't bend upwards.
Last edited by Knarrenheino at Mar 9, 2015,
#6
Quote by Knarrenheino
My signature might blow my preferences, but a Jackson Pro or a Charvel Pro Mod might be interesting too. They fit the price range, they have original Floyds and Seymour Duncan pickups, and have very comfortable compound radius necks.

A Charvel certainly doesn't look like a shredding guitar, it just looks like a HH Fender Strat with a Floyd. The So-Cal is pretty shred-heavy thanks to the Distortion pickups, but the San Dimas has the tamer, more versatile JB/59 pickup combo. Sadly, downside for you: no tone knob.

http://www.richtonemusic.co.uk/products/charvel_pro_mod_san_dimas_electric_guitar_black-char292-6000-803.asp

Jackson Dinky/Soloist models have a superstrat look, although not over the top, and not more so than the Sterling you posted imo. They also have tone knobs and some (only Dinkies if I'm not mistaken) have 5-way switches that include two coil split settings.

http://www.richtonemusic.co.uk/products/jackson_dk2mq_pro_series_dinky_trans_black.asp

The EVH Wolfgang has that D-Tuna system, with the supposed advantage of very quick and easy drop-tuning (painful with regular Floyds), and easier setup/restringing/tuning because it can't bend upwards. Downside: it can't bend upwards.


I was about to suggest them. I second this!

By the way, the only guitar that I've found in your price range with an Original Floyd Rose tremolo was this one. Unfortunately, it has a rosewood fingerboard. It also has EMGs, I don't know your opinion on them, but personally I don't like them very much:

ESP LTD M1000FM - http://www.thomann.de/gb/esp_ltd_m1000fmstbk_egitarre.htm

Anyway, the FRT O2000 and the FR 1000 that the Jackson and the Charvel have are pretty good too. Not an OFR, but still close enough!
Last edited by DanyFS at Mar 9, 2015,
#7
To clarify, if I'm not mistaken FR-O means it's a Floyd "original" made in Korea, as opposed to the super-expensive FRT models made in Germany, which you're not going to find in any guitar that's even close to that price range. If you wonder if 1000 or 2000 is better, 1000 just means chrome and 2000 black finish. Generally, from what I read and hear, they're not quite as top quality and super-reliable as the MIG models, but much better than very most of those Licensed things, and excellent in that price range. Can't complain about mine really.

As for EMG's, very shred-heavy pickups, and even though I'm a shredder, I don't like them either. One-trick pony really, great for high gain solo wankery, but bad for anything else, especially clean sounds. That's the one big thing I dislike about the M-1000.
Last edited by Knarrenheino at Mar 9, 2015,
#8
I did look at the Charvel when I was at Rich Tone actually but the lack of a tone control did put me off as I've found that since changing to an Orange amp, I'm using the tone pot all the time as the amp is so responsive. Ironic as it may seem since I just sold a PRS SE Custom 24, it has struck me that one of the guitars that would suit me best would be a PRS SE Custom 24 with a Floyd trem! They seem to all have the 1000 series Floyd on them so the real question is about the quality of that trem. Is it genuinely good or am I storing up trouble for the future?
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
#9
Quote by Knarrenheino
To clarify, if I'm not mistaken FR-O means it's a Floyd "original" made in Korea, as opposed to the super-expensive FRT models made in Germany, which you're not going to find in any guitar that's even close to that price range. If you wonder if 1000 or 2000 is better, 1000 just means chrome and 2000 black finish. Generally, from what I read and hear, they're not quite as top quality and super-reliable as the MIG models, but much better than very most of those Licensed things, and excellent in that price range. Can't complain about mine really.

As for EMG's, very shred-heavy pickups, and even though I'm a shredder, I don't like them either. One-trick pony really, great for high gain solo wankery, but bad for anything else, especially clean sounds. That's the one big thing I dislike about the M-1000.


http://www.floydrose.com/support/faq/1000-series-original

Actually, the 1000 series is an OFR made in Korea.

I'm not sure about the FRT O2000 though.
#10
All I know is that the big MIG ones cost some $300 alone and are "FRT100" or "FRT200" or whatever. The FRO-1000/2000 are the ~$120 MIK ones very widespread in guitars of that price range that like to have original quality parts like EMG/Duncan/Dimarzio pickups. Mine is a FRO2000, and so far it's excellent, although I only bought my Charvel a month ago. But it's excellent really, works wonderfully with no detuning whatsoever. Not sure about the Special, apparently they're not available for sale, only installed as OEM parts. I don't know if they're different to the MIK 1000/2000 originals.

Licensed are a different matter, I think that's just anyone building some own trem using a Floyd patent, but quality really depends on whatever the manufacturer does with the licence, but many do that and many of them have a bad reputation. I read Ibanez makes some very good trems though, and if I'm not mistaken, they're licensed Floyds too technically. It's just that many make very cheap licensed Floyds that have a bad reputation.

For further information about non-licensed models, Floyd's own site may be worth a look:

http://www.floydrose.com/catalog/tremolos
#12
But @Doadman

Do try a Jackson Pro model, great guitars with original parts, and more versatile than Charvels. Almost all of them have a tone knob.

edit: in the case of Jackson, Pro means a certain quality range. Different designs are Soloist, Dinky or Rhoads. Pro means they're in your price range and have original parts like Duncan pickups and original Floyds. There are JS Dinkies and Rhoads', which means they are built in that particular style but are generally much cheaper in price and quality.

For your preferences, I thought the Pro Dinky I linked was most fitting. The Dinky got its name from having a slightly smaller body compared to a regular strat (7/8 iirc), which I find a pretty nice body size.
Last edited by Knarrenheino at Mar 9, 2015,
#13
Quote by Knarrenheino
All I know is that the big MIG ones cost some $300 alone and are "FRT100" or "FRT200" or whatever. The FRO-1000/2000 are the ~$120 MIK ones very widespread in guitars of that price range that like to have original quality parts like EMG/Duncan/Dimarzio pickups. Mine is a FRO2000, and so far it's excellent, although I only bought my Charvel a month ago. But it's excellent really, works wonderfully with no detuning whatsoever. Not sure about the Special, apparently they're not available for sale, only installed as OEM parts. I don't know if they're different to the MIK 1000/2000 originals.

Licensed are a different matter, I think that's just anyone building some own trem using a Floyd patent, but quality really depends on whatever the manufacturer does with the licence, but many do that and many of them have a bad reputation. I read Ibanez makes some very good trems though, and if I'm not mistaken, they're licensed Floyds too technically. It's just that many make very cheap licensed Floyds that have a bad reputation.

For further information about non-licensed models, Floyd's own site may be worth a look:

http://www.floydrose.com/catalog/tremolos


Nah, you've got that all bolloxed up. Except for the part that says, "Floyd's own site may be worth a look." FR has rejiggered all the names and designations. Some go to large manufacturers ONLY (and you can't buy them direct) and many of those are Korean.

There are NO licensed Floyd Rose trems any more. There is no Floyd Patent any more, Ibanez trems are not licensed. The patent has been expired for a while, so folks can put out FR-style trems to their heart's content without licensing.

What's interesting is that both of the Korean production lines that make the actual Floyd Rose products also make identical trems (only the branding stamps are different) for asian manufacturers, and those, sold direct, are significantly less than half the cost of an FR branded trem.
#14
Quote by Knarrenheino
But @Doadman

Do try a Jackson Pro model, great guitars with original parts, and more versatile than Charvels. Almost all of them have a tone knob.

edit: in the case of Jackson, Pro means a certain quality range. Different designs are Soloist, Dinky or Rhoads. Pro means they're in your price range and have original parts like Duncan pickups and original Floyds. There are JS Dinkies and Rhoads', which means they are built in that particular style but are generally much cheaper in price and quality.

For your preferences, I thought the Pro Dinky I linked was most fitting. The Dinky got its name from having a slightly smaller body compared to a regular strat (7/8 iirc), which I find a pretty nice body size.


This one looks nice:

http://www.richtonemusic.co.uk/products/jackson_dk2mq_pro_series_dinky_chlorine_burst.asp

I have had a Jackson before when I had a Jackson SL3 Soloist. It was really nice but I sold it because I didn't get on with single coils and the maple neck-thru was a pig to get pickups to work with. The stock Seymour Duncans were woeful. This looks like a lot of guitar for the money and the only thing that puts me off is the guitar just screams 'SHRED' and I'm really not a shredder. The PRS and the EVH both look rather more subdued.
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
#15
look into a US Peavey wolfgang. you won't regret it. i have two, and i bought the second over the cheaper EVH (fender) model, and saved a few bucks. maple fret boards are really nice on them.

you may be able to get a cheap ibanez prestige. you can find a 1550 r 1570 for under $500, i picked up a 1570 and a 2570 each for under $500. if you do play on new pickups.
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#16
Quote by dspellman
There are NO licensed Floyd Rose trems any more. There is no Floyd Patent any more, Ibanez trems are not licensed. The patent has been expired for a while, so folks can put out FR-style trems to their heart's content without licensing.


But aren't there still tons of guitars around advertised with "FR Licensed"? Or am I living in a cave?
Last edited by Knarrenheino at Mar 10, 2015,
#17
Quote by Knarrenheino
But aren't there still tons of guitars around advertised with "FR Licensed"? Or am I living in a cave?


Right, as long as guitar companies keep using expressions like "Floyd Rose® Licensed Jackson® Double Locking Tremolo" and "Licensed Floyd Rose Tremolo" we can't be faulted for thinking that there's still patents and licenses out there.
#18
They could be NOS parts that are only being used on production guitars now, after the patent expired?
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#19
dspellman makes it sounds like the patent expired some time ago. Don't know if the guitar industry also follows the up-to-the-minute supply chain like they do in other industries. I bet they're just trying to cash in on the name "Floyd Rose" which they figure makes their guitars sound more valuable than "LTD Tremolo" or some such thing.
#20
But "Floyd Rose" certainly is a trademark that not anyone can use at will? I mean, I can't sell my own guitars and just write "Gibson licensed guitar" on them, can I?
Last edited by Knarrenheino at Mar 10, 2015,
#21
I guess it would come down to the licensing agreement. Perhaps it allows them to use the FR name for X-years after the expiration of the patent.
#22
I have four possible guitars selected that I will try at the weekend and with the different deals I can get, there is only £75 between the cheapest one and the most expensive.

Schecter Banshee

I've never played one of these before so it should be interesting. The headstock doesn't scream 'shred' but I think it still looks like a Metal guitar. The one in stock is Vintage Sunburst and unfortunately, I can't see my black/white zebra pickups really suiting that colour but if I like it, that wouldn't be a deal killer. I really know NOTHING about these guitars at all so if anyone can shed some light on them I'd be grateful. As I'd realistically have to sell my existing pups, the net cost of this guitar would be £525 so it would be the cheapest here, though I would probably end up buying new pups eventually, thus pushing the price back up.

Jackson DK2MQ Pro Series

The specification and look of this one is excellent. The main thing that puts me off is that it absolutely screams 'shred' and as I discovered when I sold my Soloist a couple of years ago, guitars with pointy headstocks are a pig to sell. It has a 4A quilted maple top, maple fretboard, decent Floyd, compound radius neck etc. There's no logical reason to knock this guitar and I feel silly saying the headstock puts me off but history suggests that the time will come when I sell this guitar and I suspect this will be the hardest one to shift and lose the most money. This one would come in at £575 and my existing pups would go in it beautifully, though if I did sell the pups this would then come down to £500.

EVH Wolfgang Special

I had a quick play on one of these last week and I'd like to try it again. It felt VERY solidly put together and surprisingly for me, I'd certainly not change the pickups as the stock items are superb. The neck is thicker than I expected but certainly not unpleasant to play and I love the Burnt Cherry Burst finish with the flame maple top, though I wish they offered a quilt option. I also like the fact that it doesn't look as obviously shreddy as the Jackson or Schecter, though it's not the prettiest guitar here and the headstock is fugly in my opinion and while the guitar sports a D-Tuna, it's not a feature I'm likely to use and the trem only goes down as it sits on the body. Even factoring in the sale of my existing pickups, this still comes in as the most expensive option here at £600. I love the build quality and the sound and the fact that it's not obviously shreddy but in terms of looks, I think it's a bit of a Marmite guitar and I'm unsure if I would find the restrictions on the Floyd a pain.

PRS SE Custom 24 Floyd

I feel a little stupid including this one as with the exception of the trem unit, this is EXACTLY the same as the one I just sold, even down to the colour. However, I know it's well built, I love the quilted finish, the Floyd is good and it's probably the least shreddy looking guitar here. It actually looks quite unassuming even with the Floyd. I would certainly put my existing pups in here as I don't like the stock items at all. Having said that, I would end up with a great guitar with great pickups and at £550 it's cheap. To end up with pickups of my choice, this is the cheapest guitar here so there really isn't a lot to find fault with. I would rather have a Maple fretboard or possibly ebony but being rosewood isn't a deal breaker and the only other thing I can think of is that this would be my third PRS SE CU24 so it feels a bit like I've already been there and done that but perhaps I keep coming back to them because they just suit me.

I really hope that something really stands out and grabs me on Saturday because at the moment, I have absolutely no idea at all which one would be best. As usual, experience and opinions would be welcome.
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
Last edited by Doadman at Mar 11, 2015,
#23
I can't say much about Schecters, because I only tried one for three minutes. It seemed to have a relatively thick neck and a darker tone than my Jackson or Charvel, or especially to the Ibanez I tried. But they seem to enjoy great reputation especially from a value point of view. Again, I don't know much about them, but so far I associate them with modern death metal styles, if only because lots of those guys use 'em.

I see your point about the Jackson, what I meant was that compared to all those metal axes of today (most notably BC Rich), it looks rather tame and unassuming. But at the same time, yes, it looks like a dedicated 80s shredding machine, and it is. Not necessarily bad, because those were made for best playability, and besides, a Floyd screams 80s too. But 80s-style guitars are probably a niche market, and so resale value might indeed not be the best.
#24
Quote by Knarrenheino
But "Floyd Rose" certainly is a trademark that not anyone can use at will? I mean, I can't sell my own guitars and just write "Gibson licensed guitar" on them, can I?


the name Floyd Rose is indeed a trademark and you have to have permission to use it. just because the patent has run out means nothing when it comes to the name. others can build a similar locking trem but they can't call it a floyd rose. since the name has perceived value those wishing to use an "offical" floyd rose trem still will have to pay for the right.
#25
I went to play these guitars today. The more I thought about the PRS, the more I thought that it was perhaps time for a change so I just left that one as a backup. The Schecter was lovely but it was the most expensive option there and the stock pickups (Nazgul and Sentient) were horrible so that was out. The EVH was just as lovely as I remembered with excellent pickups, though I remain surprised at how relatively chunky the neck is on that guitar. I then tried the Jackson and that had a lovely neck and surprisingly, the JB/59 pickups actually worked really well in that guitar. This surprised me a bit as when I had my Soloist, the JB wasn't that impressive. Perhaps it just works better in alder than maple. This was the scenario I'd most dreaded because I liked both of these guitars but the Jackson had the better neck for my tastes and it was £100 cheaper. Eventually I decided that to hell with it having the pointy headstock and I'd just call it another of my mid-life crisis episodes and go for the Jackson. This leads me to my final question in this long saga. The DK2 plays really well and the stock pups work well in it but I'm wondering if paying the extra £55 for the Soloist version would be a better investment. The Soloist seems to be made in Indonesia while the Dinky is made in Mexico and I suspect the Soloist might therefore not be of the same ultimate quality. From what I can gather, the Soloist has a maple veneer top whereas the Dinky has a 4A quilted maple cap, albeit a thin one at 1/8th". There's also the concern that I'd have to upgrade the pickups on the Soloist if my last one is anything to go by and while that's not the end of the world for someone like me, it does mean that the Soloist then becomes at least £80 more expensive. A lot of what I've just written suggests the Dinky is the better option but I thought I'd seek other opinions just in case, for the sake of some pickups, I'd have been better off in the long term with a Soloist.
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
#26
Quote by monwobobbo
the name Floyd Rose is indeed a trademark and you have to have permission to use it. just because the patent has run out means nothing when it comes to the name. others can build a similar locking trem but they can't call it a floyd rose. since the name has perceived value those wishing to use an "offical" floyd rose trem still will have to pay for the right.


Just a pile-on...

There are no more "licensed Floyd Rose" trems based on the Original Floyd Rose. That patent expired in 2003. Their Low Profile patent lingered on a bit longer, and I don't know when (if) that one expired. And Floyd Rose isn't licensing the use of the official Floyd Rose name on any trems that don't come directly from them.

If you're seeing "licensed Floyd Rose" on something, it's likely one of the kajillion trems that were built and distributed before the patent expired. In any case, whoever manufactured them paid the licensing fees long since and is using them in accordance with whatever agreements were signed. We'll likely trip across some cache of these 20 years from now and find that guitarists flock to the "Patent Era FR" as if it was vintage special.

You can call your trem a "Floyd Rose style" if you wish (though most will recognize it and there's no need to do that) and you can tell people that it will directly replace an FR.

But Ibanez trems no longer state "licensed by Floyd Rose", for example, and a lot of these trems are cheaper now because there are no licensing fees to pay.
Last edited by dspellman at Mar 14, 2015,
#27
Well, there just been an added complication and a VERY unusual one but first let me summarise where I am. I can pick up the Jackson for £575. The other option is the PRS with a Floyd, which I can get for £545 but I would need to change the pickups so I'm looking at about £150 taking it up to £695. That makes it quite a bit more than the Jackson, though eventually I'd be able to sell them so I'd get £75 of that back. Either way, the Jackson looks great value. Now for the complication, which involves the Sterling JP100D.

I'm not a particular Petruccci fan so I was purely drawn to the guitar as an instrument. The specification is similar to the other guitars I'm looking at but two things concerned me. Firstly was the cost, as at £675 it's a lot more than the Jackson and at that price, the bridge, which isn't OFR, won't be as good. I asked some questions about the trem system on the Music Man forum and the Vice President of the company contacted me to address my concerns. Very impressive! He advised me to contact the UK distributor about trying a guitar as absolutely nobody stocks them. I did so and also asked if anything could be done about the price as the guitar was so much more than the opposition. Due to a major mix up at their end that I won't bore you with, I received quite an abusive email in reply and consequently ended my interest in the guitar but on Friday evening, just when I was about to order the Jackson, Sterling contacted me and said they would be sending a guitar to my local store to try and if I liked it, I should let them know and that I shouldn't worry about the price as they would 'sort this' due to the abusive email I had received from them. I'm guessing they're thinking of matching the price on the Jackson, which in one sense is great because I'd be getting a JP100D for £100 less than anywhere else in Europe but conversely, I'd still have a guitar with an inferior bridge to the Jackson or PRS. It's not like I particularly need a locking tremolo but I do need one that is sturdy and reliable. I can't really pre-judge this too much until I try it next to the Jackson and the PRS but to me, the Sterling would need to be cheaper than both. Has anybody tried a JP100D and can tell me how it stacks up to a PRS SE or Jackson Pro?
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1